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This Gelato Looks (But Doesn’t Taste) Exactly Like Spaghetti

This Gelato Looks (But Doesn’t Taste) Exactly Like Spaghetti

This gelato from Gelato and Angels ice cream shop in California looks like spaghetti with marinara sauce

Yelp

Spaghetti gelato may sound gross, but it’s actually a sweet dessert in disguise.

Savory desserts are becoming quite the trend lately, but is spaghetti ice cream taking it too far? The spaghetti gelato cone, a prank dessert from Gelato and Angels gelateria in Manhattan Beach, California, is made to look exactly like spaghetti with marinara sauce and Parmesan cheese but is actually just ice cream.

Here’s how it’s made: Taking inspiration from a German dessert known as “spaghettieis,” the gelato maker starts with straining vanilla gelato into noodle-like strands on top of a waffle cone. The “spaghetti sauce” (aka strawberry sauce) and Parmesan cheese crumbles (aka white chocolate pieces) are added on top. The result is a convincing illusion of spaghetti ice cream, though presumably far more tasty than the hybrid name would suggest.

If that doesn’t tempt your taste buds, Gelato and Angels also sells gelato-filled warm doughnuts.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)

A recipe for Spaghettieis (German Spaghetti Ice Cream)! Ribbons of vanilla ice cream are topped with strawberry sauce and shredded coconut/white chocolate to resemble spaghetti in the form of a fun frozen treat.

When I was younger, some of my favorite memories while visiting family in Germany during the summer involved the incredible variety of ice cream. I loved the Eiscafé (Eisdiele) with their elaborate sundaes, but the gelato truck was also a highlight. The Italian owner of the truck always knew exactly where he could find the most customers. During the hottest part of the day, he would drive along the streets in our neighborhood. You could also find him parked outside the school right as sports practices were letting out or near the entrance of the zoo on busy weekends.

We would always pick Spaghettieis, an ice cream sundae assembled to look like spaghetti. It was first created in Mannheim in 1969 by Dario Fontenella and can now be found throughout Germany. Vanilla ice cream is pushed through a Spätzle press (potato ricer) to create the appearance of long noodles. It is topped with a strawberry sauce for the tomato sauce and garnished with grated white chocolate or dried coconut for the cheese. Whipped cream is occasionally added under the ice cream in the bottom layer of the bowl.

Here are a few photos above of some of the Spaghettieis and sundaes (Tiramisu, Strawberry and Rosé Wine Float) I tried while in Germany. I would often opt to have the Spaghettieis topped with a chocolate or vanilla sauce instead.

To create the “spaghetti” shape at home, I use a potato ricer with a small-holed plate. If the ice cream is too solid to push through the ricer, let it sit in the refrigerator or on the counter until just softened enough to handle.

The whipped cream and strawberry sauce can be made up to a couple of days in advance. I actually prefer to prepare the strawberry sauce the day before to make sure it is well chilled before pouring over the ice cream. The whipped cream is an optional addition. I usually keep it unsweetened, but will occasionally add a pinch of vanilla sugar to taste. Before pressing the ice cream, evenly spread the whipped cream across the bottom and sides of the serving bowl.

Garnish and serve the Spaghettieis immediately after pressing into the bowl. It will quickly melt and lose its shape. To help keep the ice cream chilled a little longer, place the serving bowls in the freezer for about 5 minutes before prepping. I sometimes put the potato ricer in the freezer too, but it often just makes the ice cream too stiff for me to press through so I usually skip this step.

Some fun variations I have also come across include adding “meatballs” (small scoops of chocolate ice cream or brownie bites) on top or swapping the strawberry sauce for a kiwi or pistachio sauce to make pesto.


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