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Mediterranean pork medallions recipe

Mediterranean pork medallions recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Pork

Pork medallions are sautéed, then served in a zesty vinaigrette. Serve with a green salad and crusty bread.

42 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 pork medallions
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 sprigs fresh coriander, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons port wine
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large heavy frying pan over high heat. Sauté pork until evenly browned, and fully cooked. Transfer to a bowl, and sprinkle with coriander and garlic; keep warm.
  2. In a small bowl, combine 3 tablespoons olive oil, vinegar and port. Season with salt, black pepper and cayenne. Whisk until consistency is creamy. Stir into cooked pork, and serve immediately.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(38)

Reviews in English (37)

by SUNBIRD

Turned out really good. Pork was still juicy and tender...I really loved the mediterranean touch of that meal and those wonderful spices!!-28 Feb 2002

by RogueOnion8

The flavor of the pork was wonderful. I served it over white rice and had steamed brocolli as the side dish. I used dried parsley instead of cilantro (since I hate cilantro... I know I'm crazy). I also used Vermouth instead or Port Wine. The steamed white rice didn't go very well with this dish as the marinade / sauce was very strong. Next time I will add the marinade / sauce to the pork while it is cooking and simmer it down. This should thicken the marinade / sauce considerably and give the pork even more flavor. I will also serve the pork inside of pita bread with tzatziki sauce. As the brocolli didn't fit well either, next time I will use red potatoes as the side dish.-22 Mar 2005

by Momof2

This is very similar to Thai Pork (on this site). I did like this recipe, although I did change a thing or two. I cut the pork in thin pieces instead of bite-sized. I also forgot to add the cayenne (didn't matter much) and it tasted really great. I love the red wine vinegar flavor. It is just the right amount. I did add some mushrooms and a bit of green onion to color it up a bit. I will definately be making this one again. Thanks for posting.-05 Jul 2003


  • 4 boneless or bone-in pork loin chops, cut 1/2 inch thick (1 to 1-1/2 pounds total)
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon finely snipped fresh rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. If desired, line a shallow roasting pan with foil. Sprinkle all sides of chops with salt and pepper set aside. In a small bowl combine rosemary and garlic. Sprinkle rosemary mixture evenly over all sides of the chops rub in with your fingers.

Place chops on a rack in the shallow roasting pan. Roast chops for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and continue roasting about 25 minutes or until no pink remains (160 degrees Fahrenheit) and juices run clear.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds pork tenderloin (about 1 large or 2 small)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground sweet paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup Madeira wine
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro or parsley

Mediterranean Pork Medallions with Sun-dried Tomato Pesto

Weeknight dinners, especially during the busy holiday season, can be tough because there is so much going on and schedules are packed. On nights like those, I turn to quick dinners that are still full of flavor like Mediterranean Pork Medallions with Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto.

The key to making sure that your finished dinner is packed with flavor is starting with a Smithfield Roasted Garlic & Herb Marinated Fresh Loin Filet.

Smithfield Marinated Fresh Pork is my go-to for delicious meals that are ready in 30 minutes or less. Since the prep work is already done, I can use the fresh pork in any of my recipes – whether I sauté, slow-cook, or roast it, I know I will have a super tasty meal.

For this recipe, I sliced the Smithfield Marinated Fresh Pork Loin Filet prior to cooking, so the pieces cook up quickly. Even though the slices will cook quickly, still be sure that your fresh pork is cooked to reach an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit followed by a three- minute rest.

Smithfield Marinated Fresh Pork is available in an assortment of cuts and flavors and can be found at many local grocery stores including Food Lion, Harris Teeter, and Walmart.

This recipe for Mediterranean Pork Medallions with Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto is perfect for a busy weeknight meal but elegant enough for a holiday dinner party too.

I love cooking with fresh pork, because it’s such a versatile protein. For more information on fresh pork, be sure to visit the Virginia Pork Council website. And for more recipe inspiration and details on Smithfield Marinated Fresh Pork, visit the Smithfield website.


Mediterranean pork medallions recipe - Recipes

Almond-Crusted Pork Medallions

20min Prep, 20min Cook, 40min Total

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • ½ Tbsp Italian seasoning
  • ½ tsp lemon-pepper seasoning
  • 2 pork tenderloins, trimmed (2 lb)
  • 5 Tbsp avocado oil, divided

Instructions

  1. Combine garlic, almond flour, and seasonings in a shallow bowl.
  2. Cut pork into ½-inch-thick medallions. Brush pork with 1 Tbsp oil dredge in nut mixture, pressing gently to adhere.
  3. Cook pork, in batches, in 2 Tbsp hot oil per batch in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat 4 to 5 minutes per side or until done.

Side Dish Ingredients

  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 1 (4.4-oz) pkg blueberries
  • 2 (5-oz) pkg baby arugula

Side Dish Instructions

  1. Whisk together oil, vinegar, orange juice, mustard, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Add blueberries and arugula toss.

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Bourbon pork ingredients

  • Pork tenderloin, a “forgiving” cut of meat to cook easily in the oven.
  • Extra virgin olive oil coats the meat to help seal in moisture.
  • Bourbon. The star of this show.
  • Soy sauce brings umami and depth of flavor.
  • Brown sugar brings the sweet flavor and allows the marinade to become a perfect glaze.
  • Dried minced onion is easy, but fresh onion can be used as substitute.
  • Garlic. Opt to use fresh garlic cloves and not jarred garlic.
  • Worcestershire sauce brings more flavor with notes of wood and citrus.
  • Fresh cracked pepper, but purchased ground pepper may be used as substitute.

Then, we just make a simple mustard sauce using only cream, whole grain mustard, salt, and pepper.


Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 (1-lb.) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut crosswise into 12 medallions
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • Fresh thyme leaves (optional)

Nutritional Information

  • Calories 149
  • Fat 6.4g
  • Satfat 1.2g
  • Monofat 3.3g
  • Polyfat 1.4g
  • Protein 21g
  • Carbohydrate 0.0g
  • Fiber 0.0g
  • Cholesterol 60mg
  • Iron 1mg
  • Sodium 287mg
  • Calcium 6mg
  • Sugars 0g

MEDITERRANEAN BAKED PORK TENDERLOIN

You guys are in for a treat today!

If you are a fan of pork, this Mediterranean Baked Pork Tenderloin is a recipe you are going to want to try. If you haven&rsquot baked a pork tenderloin you need to give it a try. It is one of the easiest ways to cook pork in my opinion . It creates a tender, juicy piece of pork that is full of the warm, rich spices of the Mediterranean.

I hear time and time again that people think their pork needs to be a white/gray color and that is how they know it is ready to be eaten. I am partnering with the Ohio Pork Council Ohio Pork Council to share with you that this is not true and creates a dry piece of meat. Pork needs to be cooked until about 145 degrees.

You want to see a slight blush of pink which lets you know the meat isn&rsquot overcooked. Depending on the size of you meat and the temperature you are cooking at this shouldn&rsquot take you too long.For today&rsquos recipe I found a two pack of pork tenderloin and it took me around 30 minutes at 375 degrees F.

I love the combination of cumin, cayenne pepper, coriander, allspice, cloves, cinnamon and oregano paired with meat. I created a rub for the pork and also did a generous sprinkle of salt and pepper.

You will also notice if you watch the video that I like to add garlic to the pork by making small slits into the pork tenderloin and tucking chopped pieces of garlic in to the meat. This is a trick my mom taught me and I think it is the secret to that extra delicious flavor. Plus, any trick your mom gives you when it comes to cooking is a keeper, right?


Pork Medallions With Sweet-and-Sour Tomato Sauce

Pork is a quick-cooking option when you want a meat that’s lean and easy to control, portion-wise. Here, the medallions are browned first and finished in a simple, flavorful sweet-and-sour sauce that helps keep them moist. A homemade spice rub adds complexity.

I like to use Pomi strained tomatoes for the tomato puree. It’s a seedless, no-salt-added product, but any tomato puree would work.

Servings: 4
Ingredients
Directions

For the sauce: Heat the oil in a large (10- to 12-inch) skillet or saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and stir to coat, then season them with salt and pepper to taste. Reduce the heat to medium or as needed so the onions cook but do not brown. Cook for 7 or 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are tender.

Stir in the vinegar, raisins, 3 tablespoons of the light brown sugar, tomato puree and the broth stir to combine. Once the mixture starts to bubble at the edges, cook for 10 minutes, adjusting the heat so the sauce maintains a low boil. Taste, and add salt, pepper and brown sugar as needed.

While the sauce cooks, prepare the pork: Combine the paprika, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Rub all of the spice mixture into all sides of the meat.

Heat the oil in a skillet large enough to hold the pork comfortably, over medium-high heat, until the oil shimmers. Add the meat cook for 2 to 3 minutes on the first side, until browned. Turn the pork over and cook for 2 to 3 minutes to brown the second side.

Add the sauce bring to a boil and cover, then reduce the heat to medium or medium-low so the sauce is barely bubbling. Cook for 4 minutes, then turn the pork over and cook for 4 to 5 minutes longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the side of the chop registers 145 to 150 degrees for medium. Remove from the heat let the meat rest for 5 minutes.

Divide the pork medallions among individual plates. Top each with equal amounts of the sweet-and-sour tomato sauce. Serve hot.


Reviews

Incredible flavor, went for #3. I wish the instructions didn't skip around between options, that was hard to navigate while cooking. Will make this again.

Delicious! I also made option 3.

Amazing recipe. I have made this a few times, always a hit. For option #3, after searing the pork, transfer it to a baking sheet and then put it in the oven. This allows you to make the sauce in the pan immediately. I also sieved the sauce so it doesn't have all the chunks in it (mainly because my fiance does not like burnt bits in her food). I think the different options, while interesting, makes the recipe rather confusing when using it while you cook. You have to mentally piece together all the different sections and when you are in the middle of cooking, a simple glance could confuse people.

I found the way the recipe was presented to be very confusing so I rewrote it as version 3 (which seems to be most popular with most reviewers anyway). I made the salad with couscous (faster) this time but will try with black quinoa next time around. And there WILL BE a next time, as everyone LOVED the pork and both of my picky boys liked the salad, too! My only problem was the sauce, which was too lemony, not at all spicy, and refused to emulsify. I am wondering if the fact that I cut the recipe in half and then "approximated" the measurements caused it to not work out so well. Also, since I put the pork in the oven still in the cast iron skillet in which I had seared it, I had to use a clean pan for the sauce, so no brown bits to add to the flavor.

Loved it! Followed mainly Level 2, but added a bit of dill seasoning and used Israeli couscous. Iɽ say don't add as much salt especially if you're adding salty feta. Delicious!

I haven't made this yet, but I LOVE the idea of all the options. All recipes should be like this -- this is truly family-friendly, without feeding your kids mac& cheese all the time.

I am reviewing the pork and the sauce. I made a different grain salad from the recipe, with farro, roasted cubed sweet potato, dried cranberries, and almonds. The pork, I made according to Option 3 and it was fantastic! Will definitely make it again.

I made option 3, and we LOVED it. Loved the fairly gentle spiciness--great flavor. Also thought the salad, which I made with quinoa, was terrific. Leftovers kept well in the frig. I'm making it again this week with extra salad for lunches. YUM

I enjoyed this a lot. I made option 3--like the extra spice. Even #3 is mild--unless your harissa is really spicy--mine wasn't. I don't think the instructions are very clear, tho. I chose to move the pork to another pan to roast it while I made the sauce. Perhaps it would have been fine to roast it and then make the sauce.. Anyway it was quite good--I'll make it again.

Loved this especially the salad. An easy and different way to serve pork.