New recipes

Things to Know About Guy Fieri

Things to Know About Guy Fieri

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock

The frosted-tip chef plans to open a restaurant smack dab in Times Square, the most fitting place for tourists and Fieri alike.

He’s Opening a New York City Restaurant

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock

The frosted-tip chef plans to open a restaurant smack dab in Times Square, the most fitting place for tourists and Fieri alike.

He Really Likes Cars

iStockphoto/Thinkstock

His Lamborghini was Stolen… by a Teenager

Fieri’s Lamborghini, stolen in 2008, was finally found in a storage unit owned by a 17-year-old. The 17-year-old (who pleaded not guilty, natch), is accused of car theft by rappelling down through the ceiling of the dealership, and also attempted manslaughter. Busy guy.

He May Be Homophobic? Or Just a Nice Guy Caught in a Scandal

iStockphoto/Thinkstock

In the first scandal with Fieri, City Pages' feature with ex-producer David Page alleged that not only is Fieri homophobic and immature, but that he also actively required knowledge of subjects’ sexual identity prior to interview.

He Has 120 Pairs of Sunglasses

iStockphoto/Thinkstock

According to a recent New York Post article, Guy Fieri owns 120 pairs of sunglasses, which he wears at all times, sans sunglass cord. How did he come about wearing them on the back of his head? "I could fold them in my shirt, but if I go to stir something in the kitchen, then whoop, where did they go? And I don’t want to wear them on top of my hair — then they get [hair] wax on them — so one day I just put them on the back of my head. There was no real design about how it all came about."


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Strange Things You Don't Know About The Food Network

The Food Network has been on the air for more than two decades, churning out drool-worthy dishes for the home-cooking masses and launching the careers of dozens of celebrity chefs in the process. Emeril Lagasse's "Bam!" and Rachael Ray's "EVOO" have become a part of our lexicon. We know that Anne Burrell thinks brown food equals good food. We know what Ina Garten means when she tells us to use the "good" mayonnaise. But if you peel back a layer or two, behind all the recipes and the star-studded kitchens, you might be surprised to learn some strange facts about everyone's favorite food channel. Your beloved cooking shows might not be exactly what they seem, and what goes on behind the scenes might not be exactly what you'd expect.

Whose show did Martha Stewart put the kibosh on? Did the network really air parts of an adult film? Do the chefs actually make all those dishes? Let's find out.


Watch the video: КАФЕ, ЗАКУСОЧНЫЕ И ЗАБЕГАЛОВКИ - Food Network RUS Рагу и сэндвичи (November 2021).