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In-N-Out's 'Double Double Animal Style' Burger

In-N-Out's 'Double Double Animal Style' Burger

The In-N-Out "Double Double" burger — served off-the-menu "Animal Style" — is a West Coast burger legend. Whether it’s due to the secret sauce (that some believe is really just Thousand Island dressing), the caramelized onions, or the fact that the burger patties are never frozen, it’s clear that this is an iconic burger that’s worth making at home.

Click here to see How to Make 5 Trendy Burgers at Home

Ingredients

For the sauce

  • 2 Tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons ketchup
  • 2 Tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 Teaspoons sweet pickle relish

For the caramelized onions

  • 3 onions, finely diced
  • Oil, as needed

For the burger

  • 1/4 Pound 100 percent ground chuck, formed into 2 burger patties
  • 1 Tablespoon mustard
  • 2 slices American cheese
  • 1 hamburger bun
  • 2 leaves iceberg lettuce
  • 2 slices tomato
  • 4 dill pickle slices

In-N-Out Burger Double-Double

This legendary hamburger is a construct of simple ingredients, but until now no one has succeeded in creating a perfect clone recipe—most likely because they miss the subtleties that make this 70-year-old recipe so great.

If there is such a thing as hamburger perfection, In-N-Out Burger has achieved it.

The 330-unit West Coast family-owned chain learned a long time ago that if it ain’t broke, don’t be fixing. This means the menu today looks nearly the same as it did at the first In-N-Out Burger in Baldwin Park, California over 70 years ago. With the exception of the not-so-secret “secret” menu, there are very few decisions to make from the limited choices of a hamburger, cheeseburger, Double-Double, fries, and drinks. It’s this simplicity that pins In-N-Out Burger to the top of every “Best Hamburger” list—a testament to doing just a few things and doing them really well.

The first choice on the menu is the chain’s signature, the trademarked Double-Double which comes with two beef patties and two slices of cheese, and a whole onion slice stacked between them.

There are lots of secrets to share with you regarding the construction of this amazing burger: the crispiness of the buns, the size of the relish, the best beef to use, how to make a burger “smile”—details that, on their own, seem trivial. But put all of these tricks together in one burger, and you’ll be surprised by how much the little things matter.

Which is a perfect place to start our hacking…

The majority of clone concoctions for the In-N-Out spread that I’ve seen call for sweet pickle relish, and you should steer clear of those recipes. Hacky hackers assume that all pickle relish in burger sauces is sweet pickle relish, but that is not the case.

After running the spread through a fine-mesh strainer and tasting the leftover green solids, it was clear that the relish was not sweet at all, but sour and tart. It wasn’t hard to conclude that the spread at In-N-Out is made with dill pickle relish, and that is why traditional sliced dill pickles are absent from the burgers on the menu board. That would be dill pickle overkill.

Also, the size of the pieces of chopped dill pickle in the relish is very small. Much smaller than the pickle chunks in the bottled relish you buy at the store.

That means you must finely mince the relish out of the jar, before adding it to the spread, to get the same ratio of sourness in each bite as the original burger.

And while you’re in a mincing mode, mince up that onion super fine as well.

Once you’ve minced the relish and onion, combine them with the other ingredients for the spread: mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, vinegar, paprika, and salt.

Stir this up in a small bowl, then give it some alone time. If you’re feeling lazy, you can buy my premade burger spread here.

Just as the quality of chocolate and vanilla determine the quality of your chocolate chip cookies, the ground beef you use in your hamburgers matters a lot. The beef patty is the star of every hamburger, and it can make or break a good recipe. In this case it’s a double bill, so ground beef is an especially important component.

One big reason In-N-Out’s beef tastes so good is its high-fat content. It’s higher than the 20% fat most commonly found in pre-ground chuck from your local butcher.

Ideally, you want beef that is 25% to 30% fat, and that means you’ll need to grind your own (or have a butcher do it). If you have a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer, all you’ll need is an attachment, and it’s well-worth having. It’s nice to be in charge of what goes into your ground meats.

It will be hard to tell what the fat percentage of your home-ground beef is, however, but if it looks like the photo above, it should be just right. If you start with a well-marbled chuck roast, there’s a good chance your freshly ground beef will be in the recommended fat ratio ballpark.

If you don’t have a meat grinder and are not planning to get one just because you found a cool hamburger hack on the internet, then get pre-ground chuck with an 80/20 meat-to-fat ratio.

In-N-Out uses fresh, never frozen, beef patties. Judging by the final cooked weight of the patties, the beef portions start at around 2 ounces.

To get the perfect final cooked size of In-N-Out’s patties you must start with circles that are 4 inches across.

Press the ground beef onto wax paper, then place another piece of wax paper on top until you are ready to cook ’em.

When you bite into a fresh hamburger from In-N-Out, you will experience what I call “The Crunch.” It comes from very well-done toasted bun faces that are practically cracker-crisp by the time they get pulled off the grill.

“The Crunch” is not a sensation that you will get from other chains where the hamburgers are wrapped tightly and stacked under a heat lamp. The trapped moisture in those burgers quickly steams away any pleasant crispiness from the bun. To prevent that, an In-N-Out burger is never fully enclosed in its wrapper.

“The Crunch” is easy to replicate by placing the faces of ungreased buns down onto a preheated pan over medium/low to medium heat. Check the buns periodically to see how they’re doing. You want them to be at least as dark as the photo above, and a little darker is even better.

Achieving “The Crunch” will take longer than the 4 minutes it takes to cook the burgers, so start with the buns a few minutes before cooking your beef patties.

And use the freshest, highest quality buns you can find.

Preheat another pan over medium/low to medium heat. Since every stove heats differently it’s difficult to specify exactly where your knob should be set for this step. You’ll have to figure that out for yourself after inspecting the first cooked patty.

If the beef has a nice dark brown crust on it when flipped after cooking for exactly 2 minutes, then your temperature is just right. Keep it there. If not, then adjust accordingly so that your patties are perfectly browned after 2 minutes.

Also, In-N-Out burgers are quite salty. Add a generous shaking of salt and just a pinch of coarse black pepper to both sides of each patty as they cook.

I’m stoked to have discovered this particular insider secret because it cleared up a misconception I’ve had about these burgers for over 25 years.

At first glance of promotional photographs of the Double-Double, it’s easy to assume that there are 2 slices of American cheese on top of each beef patty since the front-facing edge of the cheese is double-thick. That’s why I incorrectly called for 4 slices of cheese in my original hack of this recipe for my first book, Top Secret Recipes. That always felt wrong—4 slices is excessive and it’s not called a Double-Quadruple—but the visual of the folded cheese threw me and I made the wrong call.

This confusion was recently cleared up when I discovered that the chain teaches its workers to “make the burgers smile” by folding the cheese over itself a little bit at the front. Approximately one-quarter of the cheese is folded and then placed, folded-side-down, onto the beef patty. But rather than placing the cheese in the middle of the patty, it’s positioned so that the edge of the burger patty is exposed, making it “smile.” It’s like how you show your teeth when you smile, but in this case the beef is the teeth.

When fully assembled this exposed edge of the beef patty makes the finished burger look more appealing, and the first few bites are extra cheesy.

When you add the folded cheese slices to your patties once you flip them (add salt and pepper first), be sure to leave about 1/2 inch of the patty uncovered.

And for God’s sake, don’t use the individually wrapped cheese food slices, like Kraft Singles. That is not real cheese and it will ruin your otherwise perfect burger.

Get real American cheese and erase Kraft Singles from your shopping list forever.

Once you place the cheese add a slice of onion on top of one patty and a well-toasted bun on top of the other.

While these patties cook for 2 minutes, you’ll need to build the bottom of your masterpiece.

Spread about 1 1/2 tablespoons of spread on the crispy bottom bun

Add a slice from a perfectly ripe tomato that is about the same diameter as the bun.

Tear off some iceberg lettuce and squish it gently into the palm of your hand to compress it a bit. They do this at In-N-Out so that the lettuce doesn’t make the burger too tall to fit into the wrapper. Squishing a burger down after it’s assembled is a big no-no because it will compress the fluffy buns and squeeze the spread right out of the stack.

Now we’ll gather up the hot stuff that goes on top.

Use a spatula to stack the top patty with the bun onto the bottom patty with the onion.

Is your cool stack nearby? Hope so.

Slide the hot half of the burger onto the cool half and serve it right away. These burgers are best when eaten immediately.

For a final touch, I bought some sandwich paper at Smart & Final and wrapped the burger in it before serving. You can also do this with wax paper. Before you wrap the paper around the burger, fold over an inch or so at the top to give the paper a nice edge, just like the pros do.

Here’s the entire stack for a perfect In-N-Out Double-Double hack.

Follow the instructions exactly as described and you’ll make one of the best burgers to ever come out of your home kitchen.

Fresh ingredients, the perfect spread, moist beef patties, and a welcoming crunch on the first bite—that’s what a great hamburger’s all about.


The Secret to Making an In-N-Out-Inspired Burger at Home

I may have to wait a little while until the next time I can take a flight from New York City to Los Angeles, but nothing can stop my obsession with and longing for West Coast chain In-N-Out's Double-Double burgers — especially when they're served Animal-Style.

If you've had an Animal-Style Double-Double and don't live close to an In-N-Out location, you know exactly what I'm talking about and your mouth may be watering thinking about it right now. Sorry about that. We're all in this together, so I feel you.

Thankfully, Food Network Kitchen's Larisa Alvarez demystifies how to make a burger inspired by the chain in the Almost-Famous Animal-Style Burgers class on the Food Network Kitchen app.

For those who haven't had the pleasure of experiencing this magical sandwich and wonder what the hype is all about, let's talk about what makes this burger so crazy delicious.

At first glance, it's a cheeseburger that looks like many others: double-stacked and served with lettuce, tomato and pickles. But there are three key components make this burger next-level delicious.

The first is sweet caramelized onions. The second is the chain's signature sauce that can be replicated at home with exactly the right combination of mayonnaise, ketchup, relish and vinegar.

If you stopped right there and didn't do anything else, you'd have a good burger. But what really makes the burger sing is an ingredient I usually loathe: yellow mustard.

When it comes to mustard, my heart lies with Dijon and any brown or grainy variety, but for a Double-Double Animal-Style-inspired burger, the key is to cook each patty on one side and slather the uncooked side with yellow mustard before flipping. Believe it or not, this is the secret to getting a tangy flavor that perfectly balances out the salty melted American cheese, sweet onions and creamy sauce. Speaking of that creamy sauce, an extra helping to finish off the burger is definitely the way to go.

Since I can't grab a flight to get the original burger right now, making an inspired version at home is the next best thing. Now that my burger craving is satisfied, I'm setting my sights on learning the secret to making a perfectly seasoned fried chicken sandwich that's inspired by Chick-fil-A in the Almost-Famous Chicken Sandwiches class on the Food Network Kitchen app.


The Ins-n-Outs of an In-N-Out Double-Double, Animal-Style Burger | The Food Lab

You West Coasters have it easy. Your dogs have yards to run in. Your grapes have vines to grow on. You get to watch the sun setting and the ocean at the same time. You're never faced with the tough decision of Motorino Brooklyn or Motorino Manhattan. Even the darn earth's rotation goes in your favor, letting you sleep three hours later than me every single morning!

And all that before we even mention In-N-Out, perhaps the second most compelling reason to move out west like my wife would like me to*.

I've been a rabid, if underexposed fan of the cult-ish fast food burger joint since I tried my first Double-Double (that's two patties, two slices of cheese) a couple years back. As burgers go, it's an oddity in my book, in that it's not about the beef.

Sure, the fresh-never-frozen patties are tasty enough, but the sandwich is more than that. It's the interplay between the ooey-gooey American cheese, the sweet, darkly-toasted bun, the juicier-than-average tomatoes, the crisp iceberg, the full, un-separated-into-rings slice of onion, and the all-important sweet, tangy, pickle-laden Spread. It's a bomb that's rigged to hit every pleasure center on my brain's taste analyzation terminal (by which I mean my tongue). Salty, sweet, savory, soft, crisp, and fresh. "Overrated," people say? I think not. Let me quote the much more eloquent Nick Solares in saying "In-N-Out at the very least represents the platonic ideal of what a fast food hamburger should be."

Order the burger "Animal Style" off of their not-so-secret menu, and you bring the party to a whole new level. The onion slice gets replaced with a dollop of a sweet, darkly caramelized chopped onions, an extra stack of pickle chips goes underneath the tomato, and the patties get fried with mustard directly on the griddle.

But here's the thing: I've had my share of regular In-N-Out burgers, but never an Animal Style. That's something that needed to change, and stat.

Of course, the biggest problem with In-N-Out is that due to their commitment to freshness, they have a policy of never opening up a location that's not within a day's drive of their meat processing plant in Baldwin Park, California. For us East Coasters, that leaves two options: We lobby to put money into revolutionizing our ground transportation system and wait, or we get off our a*ses and try and make the darn things ourselves.

Option 2 sounds much more fun to me.

Fresh Frozen

Before I could begin, I'd need to get a good model to work off of.

The Mission: Get a West-Coast-only In-N-Out Animal Style Double-Double to my New York front door with less than 24 hours notice. There was only one man up to this job: I put in a call to my former MIT colleague Marios Assiotis. There are certain things that slightly nerdy Cypriot expats living in San Francisco and working for Microsoft are particularly cut out for.

Needless to say, he jumped at the excuse to hit In-N-Out. $120 in overnight delivery fees later, the UPS man showed up at my door at 9:30 the next morning, golden package in hand.** Inside were two regular Double-Doubles, two Animal Style Double-Doubles, two plain cooked beef patties, two packets of Spread, and one large chunk of dry ice to freak out Dumpling with.

I knew that the flavor of a frozen-then-thawed burger could never compare to the freshness of the original, but nevertheless I felt compelled to resurrect them—not a minor feat in and of itself!

After a totally failed attempt at reheating one whole, I realized that the best way is to separate it into individual components, and reheat each individually, tossing the veg and replacing them with fresh ones. Within the hour, I had my lunch of Zombie In-N-Out burgers:

Delicious? Certainly. As good as real? Absolutely not. But still, as a research tool to base the rest of my fresh sandwich construction on, it was invaluable.

Spread 'em

I never understood why In-N-Out refers to their sauce as "Spread". Maybe they're just a little too cool for school. In any case, all it is is a basic Thousand Island-style dressing: a mixture of ketchup, mayonnaise, and sweet pickle relish. But as anyone from the Thousand Islands will tell you, not all dressings are created equal. What's the exact ratio of ketchup to mayo? Are there other seasonings involved?

Now, gifted as I am with an extraordinarily delicate and precise palate, I could do this the artistic way, tasting the path to victory, adding a little of this and a bit of that until I'd achieved a good enough balance. But the inner nerd in me is always seeking ways to express itself, so I decided to take the mathematical approach.

According to the In-N-Out nutrition guideline, replacing the Spread with ketchup results in a decrease of 80 calories per sandwich. I know that ketchup has about 15 calories per tablespoon, so If we estimate that an average sandwich has about 2 tablespoons of sauce on it (that's the amount that's inside a single packet), then we can calculate that the Spread has got about 55 calories per tablespoon (110 calories in two tablespoons of Spread minus 30 calories in 2 tablespoons of ketchup = 80 calories difference in the sandwich). With me so far?

It just so happens that relish has about the same caloric density as ketchup (15 calories per tablespoon), and that mayonnaise has a caloric density of 80 calories per tablespoon. Using all of this information and a bit of 7th grade algebra, I was able to quickly*** calculate that the composition of the Spread is roughly 62 percent mayo, and 38 percent ketchup/relish blend:

To calculate the ratio of relish to ketchup, I washed two tablespoons of Spread through a fine mesh strainer, which got rid of the mayo and ketchup, but kept the pickle particles. Two tablespoons of rinsed Spread resulted in 1 teaspoon of strained pickle relish.

So the final Spread formula (rounded to the nearest convenient measure) was: 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons mayonnaise (62 percent), 1 tablespoon ketchup (23 percent), and 2 teaspoons pickle relish (15 percent). Damning the math, I also decided to add a tiny splash of vinegar and pinch of sugar to round out the flavors before moving on to the next phase of the operation.

Sweet Success

A regular Double-Double gets a full slice of onion in between the two patties. Upgrade to an Animal style, and those onions come intensely caramelized, their sweet complexity playing perfectly off the beefy patties. We're talking onions slow-cooked to oblivion, French-onion soup style. They're melted into a near fondue-like consistency.

I've had some experience cooking onions, but my first try at these, done by simply slow cooking a fine dice of onions in a little oil fell miserably short. They were brown alright, but they still had a distinct, crunchy, oniony texture. I was cooking them over the lowest heat possible, but they simply weren't melting—they were threatening to burn before they were sufficiently broken down.

Then I thought—if onion soup-like texture is what I'm after, why don't I use the onion soup method? I slowly caramelized onions in a little oil, then deglazed the pan with a little water and repeated this process several times, allowing the liquid to evaporate and the onions to brown further with each iteration. By doing this, the onions cool as they cook, allowing for slower caramelization, as well as distributing the browned sugars more evenly throughout the mix, improving texture and flavor.

That's 6 whole onions there, cooked down to a single cup of meltingly sweet, spreadable jam.

The Smoking Bun

In-N-Out has their buns custom made for the restaurant, and I briefly considered baking my own buns for this process, but decided against it. I can bake a good loaf of bread, but I've never come across a recipe for a soft, squishy burger bun that's an improvement on the supermarket offerings. To my mind, a Martin's potato roll or an Arnold burger bun is the apex of its form. Just like toilets or my mom's dumplings, the best you can hope for by making them yourself is an interesting variation, not an improvement.

I scanned the supermarket shelves with my frozen Double-Double in hand until I found a bun that matched it perfectly in size: Arnold it is.

The only issue is that the In-N-Out buns are a little darker. A two-minute stay in a 400 degree oven (I used my toaster oven) solved that dilemma handily. And like all good buns, these ones get toasted—nearly burnt in fact. It adds a key component to the flavor, and helps solidify its structure, crucial to keeping the torrent of gooey juices at bay.

How Fatty's the Patty?

Next up: the beef. This was going to be a little bit tougher. All I knew so far from the In-N-Out Food Quality page was that the beef is 100 percent ground chuck and that it's never frozen. That leaves a lot of room for interpretation. How big are the patties? What's the fat ratio?

Well, sizing the suckers was no problem. I simply had my good man Marios ship a couple of cooked plain patties. They both weighed in at precisely 37 grams (1.3 ounces). Accounting for the standard 35 percent loss**** in weight for a well done thin patty, that kicks us up to 57 grams or exactly 2 ounces pre-cooking—that's 1/4 pound for a Double-Double.***** A nice, round number.

As for fat content, it was time to break out the math guns again. My goal was to figure out the amount of fat vs. protein in a single In-N-Out patty. The information I have from their Nutrition Guide:

  • A single burger: 16 grams of protein and 19 grams of fat
  • A single cheeseburger: 22 grams of protein and 27 grams of fat
  • A Double-Double: 37 grams of protein and 41 grams of fat

By subtracting the value of a hamburger from that of a cheeseburger, we can calculate that a single slice of cheese contains 6 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat. Then, subtract the value of a cheeseburger plus the value of a slice of cheese from the value of a Double-Double, and you've got the fat and protein makeup of a single burger patty. It breaks down to 9 grams of protein and 6 grams of fat. Not accounting for both moisture loss and fat rendering during cooking (which in my experience is about equal), that leaves you with a 60 percent lean, 40 percent fat beef blend—a far higher fat percentage than any store-bought ground chuck. No wonder the things are so-darned delicious!

This could mean only one thing: I'd have to grind the beef myself.

I went to the butcher and got the fattiest chuck steaks I could find and ground them without trimming away any of the excess fat.

And by the way, if any of you are still buying pre-ground beef, you should stop this instant! Grinding your own meat is super easy, and is the single best way to give any burger an instant and gigantic upgrade in quality. Do it.

The Full Cast

  1. The patties: 2 ounces each, pressed flat to 4-inches in diameter
  2. The bun: Arnold, toasted whole in a 400 degree oven for 2 minutes, cut sides toasted on a lightly greased hot skillet until dark brown
  3. Pickles: Standard on the Animal-style burger. Four dill chips
  4. Real American cheese: Thick-sliced, from the deli
  5. Black pepper: Fresh ground
  6. Kosher salt: Lots.
  7. Iceberg lettuce: Fresh, leaves picked, core removed, torn to bun-size
  8. Tomato: The best hothouse tomatoes I could find, sliced 1/4-inch thick
  9. Spread: Tangy, sweet, creamy, delicious
  10. Caramelized onions: The stuff dreams are made of
  11. Yellow mustard: Signature Animal-Style trick (more on this later)

After carefully studying photographs and performing several meticulous autopsies on my frozen burger cadavers, I derived that the sandwich is built by first laying a mortar foundation of 2 tablespoons sauce on the toasted bottom bun, along with a layer of pickles slices for the Animal Style version. Next comes the tomato, followed by the lettuce.

As for the patties, Animal Style is described only as "mustard grilled," which in my book, is not all that well defined. For the complete rundown, I turned again to my spy network (a.k.a. my Facebook fan base) for support. I was almost immediately aided with photos (thanks Joe Sparks!) and detailed descriptions from past (thanks Dave Tytell!) and current employees.

The process is simple: Sear the patty on one side, and squirt some mustard on it as it sizzles. Flip the patty over so that the mustard cooks into the second side.

The patties are covered with the cheese, then the caramelized onions are applied liberally to a single patty before topping it with the second, fusing all the elements together into a single cheesy, beefy, sweet, oniony, gooey, salty, oozy, crispy, meaty, savory, melty, delicious mess. American food don't get much better than this!

So there I had it: my first taste of an honest-to-goodness, scientifically re-constructed Animal Style Double-Double clone. Would it compare with the real thing? Honestly, I didn't care—it was that good******.

Indeed, the only thing I can think of that would improve this burger is if it were available across the entire nation or—dare I say it?—the world. Don't you just love the internet?

*Reason #1 is the burger at Pie 'n Burger in Pasadena

** If anyone has ever wondered what's in the Pulp Fiction Briecase, it's frozen In-N-Outs.

*** Full Disclosure: I completely forgot 7th grade algebra, spent 30 minutes trying to figure this out, then gave up and emailed my really smart wife.

**** Which I've calculated through ruthless efficiency and an almost fanatical devotion to the burger

***** The same size as a Shack Burger, by the way. And a Quarter Pounder, for that matter.
****** Still, if anyone in CA feels like going on joining me for an In-N-Out run to do an actual side-by-side tasting next time I'm there, I'm game!


I tried making an animal-style Double-Double and have newfound respect for In-N-Out

Among its most popular In-N-Out items is its Double-Double. I made a faux animal-style Double-Double, and it was harder than I thought.

The ingredients needed to make an animal-style, Double-Double at home.

Vic Donado, chef-owner of pop-up Smish Smash, said that the best beef to use for burgers should have a ratio of 70% lean beef to 30% fat content. But an 80% lean to 20% fat content works perfectly fine, too, Donado shared.

I found that a hefty tea kettle worked wonders to press the beef patties in lieu of a burger smasher tool.

Caramelizing the onions took a ridiculously longer time than I anticipated.

After the buns are roasted in the oven, I toasted the buns on a skillet for one minute that was just enough to darken the edges.

The buns got a quick two-minute roast in the oven. I'm not completely sure it was necessary, but I did notice a slight crisp on the surface.

A look at my faux secret sauce.

Much to my surprise, a dollop of yellow mustard is smeared on each patty to give it extra flavor.

Each patty got a slice of classic American cheese.

Among its most popular In-N-Out items is its Double-Double. I made a faux animal-style Double-Double, and it was harder than I thought.

The past few months have been a blur but, if one thing&rsquos true, it&rsquos that I&rsquove taken quarantine cooking pretty seriously.

It started with dozens of chocolate chip cookies, next a couple of pound cakes, and finally my proudest achievement &mdash baking canelés that didn&rsquot taste like hockey pucks. But when it&rsquos come to cooking a complete meal, I&rsquove mostly taken a step back and helped chop onions.

Things changed a few days ago when I took full charge of making lunch from scratch. And what better a dish to debut than a household favorite? Before I knew it, I was signing up for a homemade, animal-style Double-Double, à la In-N-Out.

There are many reasons I love In-N-Out&rsquos Double-Double. The gooey cheese, the juicy stacks of meat, and that satisfying crunch from the lettuce offered in each bite. I couldn&rsquot justify a better summer dish to showcase.

It didn&rsquot seem right to dive in without first talking with an expert, so I consulted the professional guidance of one Bay Area chef who&rsquos cultivated nearly 15 years of culinary experience.

When I told Vic Donado, chef-owner of Oakland burger pop-up Smish Smash, that I was going to make a copycat animal-style Double-Double, he encouraged my endeavor and quickly relayed his years of experience on what makes an excellent burger.

"For me, the bun and the meat are two of the of the most important components to a good cheeseburger," Donado said. "I think a lot of people overlook the bun on a burger, and I don't think anyone should because it's pretty much the vessel that the meat is sitting in."

The recipe I used by Serious Eats called for oven toasted buns, plus a quick one-minute toast on a non-stick skillet. The result was golden, slightly crispy buns.

Donado shared that Martin&rsquos potato rolls are some of the best buns out there, but he said that classic, squishy white bun from brands like Bimbo or Franz would do the trick. When it comes to the meat, Donado said freshly ground beef is key and said that a 70% lean to 30% fat blend was his preference.

"What the 70-30 blend does is that it prevents the meat from drying out and you're getting a nice crust when you're smashing it," Donado said. "You can also get a really, really good burger out of an 80-20 blend."

Smashing patties was one technique Donado shared for perfecting a burger, but more on that later.

Making a homemade In-N-Out burger wouldn&rsquot be fair without contacting the chain itself. So, in true journalistic form, I reached out to the company, but they declined to comment as it "rarely participates in interviews." I checked that off my list, scoured the internet for a high-rated recipe and prepared for the task at hand.

Stirring the pot

Things started off easy enough. After I decided on a Serious Eats recipe, I collected all the items needed for the burger, with some modifications. The recipe called for fresh beef chuck ground at home using a meat grinder or food processor. I didn&rsquot own either, so I opted for an 80-20 blend of ground beef from my local grocery store.

Next, I had to heat up the oven to 400 degrees to toast the hamburger buns. I couldn&rsquot get my hands on the coveted Martin&rsquos potato rolls, so I made sure to carefully vet my options at my local Safeway. I decided to go for one of its most expensive options &mdash a Signature Select pack of eight potato buns for $4.09.

While the oven heated up, I started preparing the faux secret sauce, which included ketchup, mayonnaise, sweet pickle relish, sugar and distilled white vinegar. A quick stir transformed the amalgam into copycat secret sauce right before my eyes. I was amazed.

While I set that aside, I put my chopping skills to the test to begin caramelizing onions. Here&rsquos the part that threw me in for a loop. Who knew that caramelizing onions would take the bulk of my cook time?

"Reduce heat to medium low, and cook, tossing and stirring occasionally until onions are well browned, about 15 minutes," the recipe noted, but in reality, I found myself tending the onions for what felt like 30 minutes. After they cooked into a beautiful golden hue, I realized that I hadn&rsquot made enough. It was back to the chopping board.

I threw the buns in the oven for a couple minutes and then onto a griddle I found tucked in the back corner of a kitchen cabinet. The burger buns were lightly crisped with nice dark, brown edges.

Now here&rsquos the part when things got interesting. I grabbed the packet of meat and began to form beef rounds on a cutting board. The recipe called for 2-ounce patties, but I eyeballed it. Big mistake.

Smashing burgers with a burger iron or burger smasher tool helps enhance the flavor, Donado shared, and is one technique he uses at Smish Smash.

"That's when the burger will start doing its thing," Donado said. "You&rsquore creating a nice crust on the outside."

While this move will sting the eyes of most professional chefs out there, I found that a hefty tea kettle worked wonders to press the beef patties in lieu of a burger smasher tool.

In-N-Out doesn't smash its burgers, nor does the recipe I use call for it, but since it was my version I thought, what the hell. Why not?

Knowing I didn&rsquot have that tool lying around my kitchen, I quickly found the next best thing &mdash a hefty tea kettle. Stay with me here: I know this move will sting the eyes of most professional chefs out there, but I found that this particular tea kettle worked wonders with its cast iron material and rounded bottom. Plus, who was I trying to impress anyway? A couple of unmoved family members? They could deal with it.

The press worked well, but I realized all too late that the patties were much smaller than intended. So small, in fact that they wouldn&rsquot have done a slider any justice. Thankfully, I had enough meat left over to prepare four more. Once formed and seasoned, they were tossed on the hot grill.

These were turning out much better than the first batch and I added a dollop of bright yellow mustard to the raw sides, something I didn&rsquot realize would truly amplify the flavor. The patties were flipped and given a slice of American cheese. Before I knew it, my animal style Double-Double was ready to assemble.

The taste test

The time had come to prove my worth as an amateur cook. I glanced at the recipe one last time to remind myself what the burger looked like and went to work. The bottom bun was slathered with "secret sauce" and given two pickle chips, a slice of tomato, and lettuce. I carefully placed one burger patty at a time and made sure to top both with the animal-style onions I prepared. The top bun was likewise coated with &ldquosecret sauce&rdquo and placed gently like a crown.


You Want Fries With That

I had to have the Animal Style Fries, who could pass up cheese fries covered with spread and grilled onions.

While people rave about the burgers, fries at In-N-Out Burger are controversial and many criticize they are too soggy.

But you can ask for them to be cooked well done or fries light well which are crunchier but not overcooked.


Ground Beef Burger Recipe Reddit - In N Out S Double Double Animal Style Recipe

Ground Beef Burger Recipe Reddit - In N Out S Double Double Animal Style Recipe. Replace the worcestershire sauce with 2 tsp ground. Ground beef lends itself to a multitude of amazing recipes. Ground beef & burger recipes. Ground beef is a simple ingredient that add depth to soups, appetizers and sauces. Learn how to make burgers at home. Recipes are not required but are heavily encouraged please be kind and provide one. We make kabob burgers and mix finely chopped parsley and onions into the ground beef. The humble burger is america's most iconic food, but some are more iconic than others. You know how i like quick and easy recipes that turn a simple meal into a dinner or lunch full of flavor. In this hamburger recipe, adding onion delivers moisture

I discovered a secret that keeps my homemade burgers from ending up how to make a homemade beef burger. We make kabob burgers and mix finely chopped parsley and onions into the ground beef. Here, 71 of the best ground beef recipes we could find. Replace the beef mince with lamb mince (preferably from leg trimmings) Collection by shelly • last updated 8 weeks ago. Ground beef & burger recipes. Recipes are not required but are heavily encouraged please be kind and provide one. The humble burger is america's most iconic food, but some are more iconic than others. If you're interested in expanding your ground beef repetoire beyond the burger, keep reading for 14 of our favorite recipes. We've got plenty of easy dinner ideas right here that are sure to please the entire family.

Ground Beef Recall 2020 Walmart Brand Marketside Butcher In Recall from www.gannett-cdn.com Ground beef and porcini grilled burger, topped with swiss cheese and sautéed onions and shiitake mushrooms. Your summer cookouts and bbqs will not be complete without the perfect ground beef recipes and hamburger recipes from food.com. Homemade japanese hamburger steak recipe that melts in your mouth, served with a red wine supermarkets in japan sell a convenient package of both ground beef and ground pork (we call it the common ratio of aibiki niku is 7:3. With this recipe i show you how to make hamburger patties from ground beef that are delicious. This recipe really does make outstanding burgers. There's nothing wrong with that, but recently i've been wanting to mix things up a little bit. It is used in many recipes including hamburgers and spaghetti bolognese. Beef stock gives the stew its essential beefy flavor, while a basic flour and water add the ground beef and onion to the pan and cook, stirring, until the onion is translucent and the beef is no longer pink.

Lamb burgers with mediterranean spices:

Recipes are not required but are heavily encouraged please be kind and provide one. These days it usually refers to a burger in which a portobello mushroom takes the place of the. Sprinkle the ground beef evenly with 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Will you make burgers for the millionth time, or will you shake things up and try something new? Ground beef, minced beef or beef mince is beef that has been finely chopped with a knife or a meat grinder (american english) or mincing machine (british english). Hamburgers, meatloaf, meatballs, burritos, beef and rice, these are like the only things i ever use ground beef for and it's kind of boring. Does anyone have some good recipes to spice up the routine a little? The best hamburger recipes are made with nothing more than beef, salt. A recipe consists of a list of ingredients and directions, not just a link to a domain. A barbecue isn't complete without a proper homemade burger so we show you how to make the perfect beef, lamb, pork, fish or veggie burger. What i do is take fresh ground beef and cut it into portions and form them into patties working the meat as little as possible. They're easy to prepare in advance of. In this hamburger recipe, adding onion delivers moisture Ground beef is a simple ingredient that add depth to soups, appetizers and sauces. I like to use lean ground beef for burgers but they are dry if cooked well done which is needed for safety.

Sprinkle the ground beef evenly with 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. The best and easy to make ground beef and pork burger recipe! What i do is take fresh ground beef and cut it into portions and form them into patties working the meat as little as possible. Ground beef and porcini grilled burger, topped with swiss cheese and sautéed onions and shiitake mushrooms. Will you make burgers for the millionth time, or will you shake things up and try something new? You know how i like quick and easy recipes that turn a simple meal into a dinner or lunch full of flavor. Here are the simple steps to an amazing homemade hamburger. Recipes are not required but are heavily encouraged please be kind and provide one.

Best Smash Burger Recipe How To Grill Tasty Food Grillin With Dad from grillinwithdad.com Ground beef is a simple ingredient that add depth to soups, appetizers and sauces. Ground beef & burger recipes. You can also use ground sirloin or ground sirlon for extra beefy flavor, but they are more lean so you will want to. These days it usually refers to a burger in which a portobello mushroom takes the place of the. If i buy ground beef, nine times out of ten it's because i'm making hamburgers. For this hambagu recipe, you can decide the beef/pork ratio.

We make kabob burgers and mix finely chopped parsley and onions into the ground beef.

These easy ground beef recipes make dinner fun and filling, without breaking the bank. Ground beef, minced beef or beef mince is beef that has been finely chopped with a knife or a meat grinder (american english) or mincing machine (british english). I discovered a secret that keeps my homemade burgers from ending up how to make a homemade beef burger. There's a pound of ground beef in the fridge, and now the choice is yours: It used to be, mushroom burger just meant a hamburger with lots of mushrooms piled on top. Homemade japanese hamburger steak recipe that melts in your mouth, served with a red wine supermarkets in japan sell a convenient package of both ground beef and ground pork (we call it the common ratio of aibiki niku is 7:3. Ground beef & burger recipes. Collection by shelly • last updated 8 weeks ago. Sprinkle the ground beef evenly with 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. This hearty ground beef stew is a simple combination of lean ground beef, potatoes, and carrots. For this hambagu recipe, you can decide the beef/pork ratio. This homemade grilled burger the best low carb, keto, healthy and flavorful recipe you ever saw.

Collection by shelly • last updated 8 weeks ago. Beef stock gives the stew its essential beefy flavor, while a basic flour and water add the ground beef and onion to the pan and cook, stirring, until the onion is translucent and the beef is no longer pink. Does anyone have some good recipes to spice up the routine a little? Homemade japanese hamburger steak recipe that melts in your mouth, served with a red wine supermarkets in japan sell a convenient package of both ground beef and ground pork (we call it the common ratio of aibiki niku is 7:3. Here, 71 of the best ground beef recipes we could find.

Homemade Burger King Whopper Style Cheeseburgers Recipe from www.seriouseats.com There's a pound of ground beef in the fridge, and now the choice is yours: For this hambagu recipe, you can decide the beef/pork ratio. I served my burgers with my recipe for oven baked fries. There's nothing wrong with that, but recently i've been wanting to mix things up a little bit. In this hamburger recipe, adding onion delivers moisture Your summer cookouts and bbqs will not be complete without the perfect ground beef recipes and hamburger recipes from food.com. A barbecue isn't complete without a proper homemade burger so we show you how to make the perfect beef, lamb, pork, fish or veggie burger. With this recipe i show you how to make hamburger patties from ground beef that are delicious.

I served my burgers with my recipe for oven baked fries.

Summer is here and if you want to impress on the bbq then you must try my homemade beef burger recipe. There's a pound of ground beef in the fridge, and now the choice is yours: Include plain text recipes for any food that you post, either in the post or in a comment. There's nothing wrong with that, but recently i've been wanting to mix things up a little bit. They're easy to prepare in advance of. Homemade japanese hamburger steak recipe that melts in your mouth, served with a red wine supermarkets in japan sell a convenient package of both ground beef and ground pork (we call it the common ratio of aibiki niku is 7:3. With this recipe i show you how to make hamburger patties from ground beef that are delicious. What i do is take fresh ground beef and cut it into portions and form them into patties working the meat as little as possible. Lamb burgers with mediterranean spices: It used to be, mushroom burger just meant a hamburger with lots of mushrooms piled on top. Replace the beef mince with lamb mince (preferably from leg trimmings) It's similar to an oklahoma fried onion. *ground beef 93% lean, 16 oz ) onions, raw, 1 cup, chopped garlic, 3 tsp paprika, 1 tbsp pepper, black, 1 tbsp oregano, ground, 1 tbsp pepper, red or cayenne we like our burgers medium, shorten your time if you like them a little less done. This recipe really does make outstanding burgers.

If you're interested in expanding your ground beef repetoire beyond the burger, keep reading for 14 of our favorite recipes.

I served my burgers with my recipe for oven baked fries.

Replace the worcestershire sauce with 2 tsp ground.

I served my burgers with my recipe for oven baked fries.

They're easy to prepare in advance of.

Homemade japanese hamburger steak recipe that melts in your mouth, served with a red wine supermarkets in japan sell a convenient package of both ground beef and ground pork (we call it the common ratio of aibiki niku is 7:3.

I made this recipe with ground venison because that's the meat i had.

If you're interested in expanding your ground beef repetoire beyond the burger, keep reading for 14 of our favorite recipes.

They're easy to prepare in advance of.

I like to use lean ground beef for burgers but they are dry if cooked well done which is needed for safety.

In this hamburger recipe, adding onion delivers moisture

Learn how to make burgers at home.

The humble burger is america's most iconic food, but some are more iconic than others.

And while burgers are no doubt a delicious paleo meal.

Your summer cookouts and bbqs will not be complete without the perfect ground beef recipes and hamburger recipes from food.com.

The beef burger patties are so juicy and this recipe really does make outstanding burgers.

Forming thicker patties prevents them from cooking too fast and drying out.

These days it usually refers to a burger in which a portobello mushroom takes the place of the.

If i buy ground beef, nine times out of ten it's because i'm making hamburgers.

This is what you need to make a perfect homemade burger:

If you're interested in expanding your ground beef repetoire beyond the burger, keep reading for 14 of our favorite recipes.

This hearty ground beef stew is a simple combination of lean ground beef, potatoes, and carrots.

A barbecue isn't complete without a proper homemade burger so we show you how to make the perfect beef, lamb, pork, fish or veggie burger.

Ground beef is a simple ingredient that add depth to soups, appetizers and sauces.


Skip the Drive-Through — This Copycat In-N-Out Animal-Style Cheeseburger Looks Amazing

Every once in a while, a fast-food craving hits that can't be satisfied by anything other than a good ol' fashioned cheeseburger and fries. For In-N-Out fans, TikTok user @thefeedfeed has a copycat Double-Double Animal-Style Cheeseburger recipe that you can make at home with a few simple ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen. With so many simple ingredients, the real star of the show is the sweet and tangy animal-style sauce, which is composed of mayo, whole-grain mustard, ketchup, and a few other basic add-ins.

Best of all, you can also cook up some animal-style fries at the same time. If you feel like mixing up restaurant chains, you could also whip up a batch of Five Guys' cajun french fries as a worthy side dish for this cheesy homemade treat. For anyone looking to skip the drive-through — or if you don't have an In-N-Out restaurant nearby — see how to make the iconic burger for yourself ahead.


THE CLASSIC ON-MENU ITEMS

You roll up to In-N-Out and you see the classic menu that'll probably never change. It's beautiful, consistent, basic, fresh, always made-to-order and delicious:

Unless instructed otherwise, your burgers come with fresh lettuce, tomatoes, raw onions, their famous Thousand Island spread over the toasted bun and of course beef patties. If you get a cheeseburger, they a slice of cheese, of course, and a double-double has two beef patties with two slices of cheese. If you want to split a hamburger in half for the kiddos, they'll happily do that for you as well.

That was the easy part. Now we get to the 'instructed otherwise' part of the list, which is the fun part.


How to Make an In-N-Out Burger – Animal Style

Jamie Spafford, from SortedFood, tweeted recently he was missing his In-N-Out burger. I met Jamie at Vidcon California just recently and he has inspired me to make an In-N-Out Double Double Animal Style so others could see what all the fuss was about.

In the pursuit of science I had to try a few before I could recreate this delicious burger as you may have seen in my previous vlogs

Steve’s Kitchen, is FREE consider Becoming a Patreon we Love our Patreons, they keep the show Rolling Or send some Love through PayPal every little helps.. ❤

How to make an In-N-Out Burger – Animal Style
Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 10 Minutes


Watch the video: ASMR IN N OUT MUKBANG ANIMAL STYLE FRIES EXTRA CHEESE DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER 먹방 꿀벌 (October 2021).