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Baltimore zoo cocktail recipe

Baltimore zoo cocktail recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Drink
  • Cocktails
  • Gin cocktails

This alcoholic drink is deceivingly strong. It's similar to a Long Island iced tea, only better! It's the perfect summer drink to enjoy all year long.

17 people made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 2 cupfuls ice cubes
  • 1 tablespoon silver tequila
  • 1 tablespoon gin
  • 1 tablespoon white rum
  • 1 tablespoon vodka
  • 1 tablespoon triple sec
  • 85ml orange juice
  • 85ml grenadine syrup
  • 85ml beer

MethodPrep:10min ›Ready in:10min

  1. Fill a serving jug with ice and pour in the tequila, gin, rum, vodka, triple sec, orange juice and grenadine. Stir to mix, then pour in beer to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(26)

Reviews in English (22)

by Cheryl Brooks

Great drink to have at home as long as you don't have to drive. We don't like beer, so replaced that with a splash of sprite. Also I use gin instead of tequila. You absolutely cannot taste the alcohol, so do not serve this at a party and allow people to drive home after-wards.-31 Dec 2010

by Jbooshey

Very good and the beer adds some needed carbonation. I made this in a pitcher with a 1/4 cup of the liquors and 1 1/2 cups of grenadine, a full bottle of New Glarus Spotted Cow and 3 cups of orange juice.-13 Apr 2011


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The description in the 1953 Raymond Chandler novel The Long Goodbye stated that "a real gimlet is half gin and half Rose's lime juice and nothing else". A similar lime juice cocktail using rum instead of vodka or gin is called a daiquiri.

Over the years, the Martini has become one of the best-known mixed alcoholic beverages. Notable Baltimore Sun writer H. L. Mencken called the Martini "the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet" and E. B. White called it "the elixir of quietude".


Hummingbird-003.jpg

Place your feeder in the shade away from windows and areas with a lot of activity. If possible, place your feeder near trees. Hummingbirds are territorial and like to perch in nearby trees to chase away intruders at their feeding area.


Which beverage consists of wine, chopped fruit, sweetener, and brandy?

Sangria has existed in various forms for over 2,000 years. It is believed that the Romans mixed wine with water to sanitize the drinking water of their expanding empire as it reached the Iberian Peninsula, where Spain and Portugal now are. By the early 18th century, Sangria had spread to Latin America. It did not become a widely consumed drink in the US until it was showcased at the 1964 World's Fair in New York. Sangria can come in a lot of shapes and sizes: the type of fruit used, the kind of spirits added (if any), and the presence or lack of carbonation can all vary. What rarely changes is its deliciousness!


Did They Monkey With the Recipe?

A century ago, in the days before antibiotics, the gathering dangers of growing licentiousness were very much on the minds of the doctors treating social diseases. At a January 1907 meeting of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Dr. Howard Kelly of Baltimore presented a paper arguing that “if we can effectively protect the innocent, there will be no more transmission of venereal disease.” As reported in the American Journal of Obstetrics, Dr. John B. Deaver rose to give his learned colleague a hearty hear, hear, and also to place the blame for the situation where it was due: “I have often been astonished to find that cocktails were served at dinner where ladies were present,” the good doctor harrumphed, “and more greatly surprised to find that the ladies drink them more heartily than the men.”

Dr. Deaver proclaimed himself to be “strongly opposed to such customs, believing that they are the root of the evil,” and he singled out for disapprobation the Caruso cocktail, calling it “the latest innovation.”

The doctor was well informed about the newest fad in the world of drink—perhaps suspiciously so—but what of his argument? After a few years in fashion, the Caruso disappeared from the nation’s bars the country’s morals seem not to have improved. Even so, it is no accident that Dr. Deaver would associate a Caruso cocktail with naughtiness beyond that normally associated with liquor, as the Italian tenor after whom the drink was named had recently been busted for some, well, monkey business.

A pioneer in the modern concept of celebrity, Enrico Caruso was always in the news, perhaps never more so than around the time his namesake drink appeared. The singer had been arrested in the fall of 1906 when, on a visit to the Central Park Zoo, a woman who (falsely) gave her name as Mrs. Hannah Graham accused him of pinching her bottom in the monkey house. She never showed up to testify against him, but Caruso was convicted nonetheless and fined $10. A.J. Liebling would later write that the whole thing was “a press agent’s trick” to promote the tenor as “a Pan-god, or satyr.” Maybe. But at the very least, the scandal seems to have produced a cocktail in honor of the monkey-house masher.

But how is the drink made? A Caruso cocktail survives, dusty from disuse, in the pages of the average bartender’s guide. That drink is compounded of equal parts gin, dry vermouth and crème de menthe, and it’s not very good. If no one drinks it, and it’s not very good, what’s it doing in the books? Perhaps the Caruso has persisted for the same reason as most of the cocktails in such compendia—to fill space. If a bad recipe gets printed in one bar guide—especially a prominent one like the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book, in which the less than palatable Caruso was listed—it soon finds its way into all the others.


Baltimore zoo cocktail recipe - Recipes

There’s something about sitting near a body of water that makes booze taste better. While the beach is one ideal summer drinking spot, the pool has its merits too. Whether you’re holding a small gathering of swimming enthusiasts at your backyard baby pool, turning out in your best bathing suit at an epic pool party , or smuggling al fresco cocktails (not that we condone that type of behavior) into your local public pool, these are the drinks you need to sip poolside before summer ends. Roll your bar cart outside and mix up these nine refreshing cocktails while there’s still time.

The bartenders at Nashville’s Pinewood Social are well versed in oppressive heat waves, so they know how to find salvation via a pool-drink combo. Their go-to relief libation is this cooling Sangria , which amps up red wine with Applejack, dry curaçao and St-Germain. There’s even some lemony, limey Sprite in the mix to further cool you down on a 90-something degree day.


Tight Snatch

If you're looking for the best Tight Snatch recipe, you can find it right here along with just about any other drink. From what's in a Tight Snatch to exactly how to mix & how to make the Tight Snatch drink, whether you're a bartender, mixologist, or just having fun at your home, CrystalMixer has just about every drink and variation you need. This recipe version is made with these ingredients: ice, Absolut® vodka, peach schnapps, orange juice, cranberry juice.

With all of today's fancy technology, we simplify the bartender's guide. We have all the delicious Cocktails you can possibly create. If you have a list of ingredients you have available, or want your drink to include, don't forget our Drink Builder to help find matching recipes. Check out the ingredients and instructions below to learn how to make your Tight Snatch drink, then finally enjoy this awesome mixed drink!


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Recipe Summary

  • 4 quarts water
  • 48 ounces light beer
  • 1 cup Old Bay seasoning
  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 6 lemons, halved, plus lemon wedges for serving
  • 4 garlic heads, halved
  • 3 small yellow onions, halved with root ends intact
  • 2 pounds small red potatoes, halved
  • 2 pounds andouille sausage, cut into 3-inch pieces
  • 8 medium-size ears fresh corn, halved
  • 4 pounds live blue crabs

Combine water, beer, Old Bay, salt, lemons, garlic, and onions in a large (8- to 10-quart) stockpot bring to a boil over medium-high. Add potatoes, sausage, and corn, and cook until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Using a slotted spoon remove all solids from pot, and spread in a single layer on a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper or newspaper.

Return cooking liquid to a boil add crabs, and cook until shells are bright orange and crabmeat flakes easily, about 10 minutes. Serve crabs with potatoes, sausage, corn, and lemon wedges.