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Passatelli in Brodo Recipe

Passatelli in Brodo Recipe

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Parmigiano-Reggiano

A traditional dish of the Italian region of Le Marche and its neighbor, Romagna, these simple and flavorful dumplings are the perfect warming comfort for Christmas or New Year’s. An excellent quality chicken or meat broth is essential.

Notes

*Note: If the eggs are small, you may need fewer breadcrumbs; if they are large, you might need some of the optional flour to tighten up the mixture.

Ingredients

  • 5 1/2 tablespoons dried breadcrumbs* (see note below)
  • 5 1/2 tablespoons Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano, grated
  • Pinch of nutmeg, freshly grated
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, or as needed (optional)
  • 1 quart chicken or other meat broth, preferably homemade
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 -2 green onions, white and green parts, sliced thinly on a bias, for garnish

Servings4

Calories Per Serving153

Folate equivalent (total)30µg7%


Passatelli Pasta from Emilia-Romagna

Although I have lived in Italy for 18 years, I only discovered passatelli recently. Probably because this pasta is not typical in many parts of Italy. Although you can find it in Marche and Lazio, it’s considered to be essentially Romagnolo from Emilia-Romagna.

I came across this cheesy pasta whilst doing research for this blog and my first reaction was that I absolutely had to make it myself! I went out to buy the tool used, which Italians call ‘il ferro di passatelli’ (passatelli iron). This is actually a handheld press with holes, similar to a spaetzle maker or potato ricer. Passatelli is traditionally served in broth but there are many other recipes for it.

First time round I decided to skip the broth making stage and bake the passatelli (after cooking them in stock) with pine nuts, pancetta and cheese. It was delicious and I fell in love!

Although passatelli is not made with flour, it is still classified as a type of pasta. These soft, normally homemade strands of breadcrumbs, grated Parmigiano cheese and eggs are an ancient tradition. A tradition that was born in the rural low income areas, where leftovers and simple foods like stale bread, cheese and eggs were used often to create tasty dishes.

In the past, passatelli was considered a special dish because the strands were made with white bread The original recipe called for breadcrumbs and cheese in equal measure. But, in the homes of the wealthy more Parmigiano was used, whilst in the homes of the poor more bread!


Passatelli in Brodo (Comfort Pasta for Cold Evenings)

Passatelli (puh-ssuh-tell-e) is a real comfort food typical of the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Usually eaten on cold evenings and accompanied by a genuine homemade meat and vegetable stock can be a great cure for a bad cold. You can prepare Passatelli using a potato masher or a meat grinder with large holes (originally it was the custom to use a special Passatelli utensil, but it’s not easy to find it nowadays).

Ingredients

  • 5-⅓ ounces, weight Bread Crumbs, Extra Finely Grated
  • 3-¼ teaspoons Fresh Ground Nutmeg (grated Directly From The Seed Is Better)
  • 3 Medium Eggs
  • 1 Pinchs Salt
  • 7 ounces, weight Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese, Grated (plus Extra For Garnish)
  • 5 cups Chicken Or Capon Broth (or Substitute 5 Cups Water Plus 1 Bouillon Cube For The 5 Cups Broth)

Preparation

In a large bowl mix all the ingredients (except the broth) to form a smooth dough. It will be quite tough, not like a pizza dough (if it’s too sticky add some bread crumbs, if it crumbles add few drops of water). Let the dough rest 15 minutes covered with a piece of plastic wrap.

Put the dough into a potato masher or a meat grinder with large holes (0.2 inches in diameter) and form the Passatelli cutting them into 2” length.

Put the Passatelli on a plate and try to leave space between them to keep them from sticking together.

Bring a pot filled with your favorite stock (salted to taste) to a boil. Once boiling add the pasta and cook until they float (about 5 minutes). Put Passatelli and some broth into soup plates and sprinkle with grated Parmigiano Reggiano if desired.

They’re even better after 2 hours. So if you want to do this, just let the cooked Passatelli sit in the pot of broth (off the heat) until ready to serve and then heat it up before serving.

You can discard the broth and toss the pasta with some ragù/meat sauce or even with a seafood sauce (in that second case cook Passatelli in a fish broth, drain them and serve with the sauce).

You can refrigerate both fresh and cooked Passatelli with their broth for a month.


Grandma’s Passatelli: the original recipe

BUONGIORNO!
Today’s recipe is probably in my top 3 favourite pasta dishes: PASSATELLI Romagnoli!
Considering I love broth, I am always serving Passatelli in Brodo (broth), but it can be served with different sauces, for example at the beach, on the Adriatic Coast it’s normally served with a seafood sauce (delicious too!).
But for me, broth and Passatelli are the perfect combination!

Let’s make them together! A very simple procedure, but BELIEVE ME….with such a delicious result!
ENJOY!

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Passatelli | Ph. Federica Cortezzi

Recipe

Ingredients

120g fine grind breadcrumbs
120g fine grind parmigiano Reggiano cheese
3 eggs
1 organic lemon (zest)
½ grated nutmeg
pinch of salt

Preparation

Combine breadcrumbs, finely grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and eggs.
Add lemon zest, nutmeg and a pinch of salt.

Using your hands mix all the ingredients together until you form a dough ball.
Knead well for a few minutes letting all the ingredients combine and stick together.
Wrap the dough in a plastic wrap and let rest for at least half an hour (from a few hours to a day or two in the fridge in wrapping paper). If you have no time to let it rest, it is also fine, just make sure all the ingredients come together in a compact dough to prevent breakage.

Divide the dough in 2-3 parts. Run each piece through the Passatelli iron (see picture).
Press the dough through the iron, then let them rest on a paper tray.

I always use the Passatelli iron from my nonna, for me it’s the best way to make passatelli, maybe sentimentally but also for their consistency (I prefer them to be thicker than slimmer).

As an alternative, if you cannot find the Passatelli iron or you don’t feel that comfortable with it, run each piece through a potato press using a disc with the largest opening.

How to cook them

Drop the passatelli directly in boiling broth (or water if you prefer using another sauce, for example seafood sauce) right off the press and let cook until they rise to the top.

Served with broth

Ingredients:
3-4 litres of water
1/4 piece of hen 1 piece of beef
1 stalk of celery
1 carrot
½ onion 2 small tomatoes

Boil it in low flame for at least 2-3 hours (45 mins pressure cooker).

Food History

Exclusively hand-made with kitchen scraps such as stale bread, hardened cheese, eggs and beef marrow bones (PELLEGRINO ARTUSI N.20 Recipe) Passatelli, or rather passatelli soup, is a poor but definitely tasty dish typical of the ancient Emilia-Romagna culinary tradition.
The name “Passatelli” stands for “going thorugh” the iron used to make them.

In the past, passatelli were prepared only for important occasions: Christmas Eve, Easter, but also births, baptisms, or weddings since Parmigiano Reggiano cheese was a real luxury back in time!
In wealthy Families, passatelli were made of a lot of cheese, while at the farmer’s houses the main ingredient was stale bread (Passatelli in fact they have always been seen as comfort food).

Nowdays, for people from Romagna in particular, on a chilly day or back from a long trip, nothing can be better than a hot bowl of freshly made Passatelli in Brodo!


Massimo Bottura’s Recipe for Passatelli

Chef Massimo Bottura’s passatelli, a traditional pasta made with eggs and Parmigiano cheese.

Guests at Massimo Bottura’s three Michelin-star Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy receive a parting gift of breadcrumbs from the surplus of the in-house bakery, along with his grandmother’s recipe for passatelli, a traditional pasta made with eggs and Parmigiano cheese. Here’s how to transform would-be waste into your next great meal. (Related story: Chef Massimo Bottura on Why the Future of Food is in Our Trash.)

  • 1½ cups breadcrumbs
  • 1 cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano
  • 3 eggs
  • pinch of lemon zest
  • pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 4 cups chicken broth

Place the breadcrumbs, Parmigiano Reggiano, nutmeg and lemon zest in a shallow bowl. In the meantime, bring broth to a boil. Beat the eggs and add to the dry ingredients. Mix together into a uniform ball of dough. Place the dough in a ricer and press it directly into the boiling broth. Cook the passatelli until they surface, about 1 minute. Serve hot with broth in a bowl.

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Passatelli in Brodo

Passatelli are a traditional recipe from Romagna they are little cylinders (roughly 4 mm thick and 4 cm long) prepared with a mixture of bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, eggs, nutmeg and lemon zest.

Passatelli are prepared using a special tool which is a slightly domed metal disc with a diameter of 15 cm, with 4-5 mm wide holes with a dumbbell and two side handles.

This tool is placed over a ball of dough and then pressed on top of it so that the 'passatelli' can protrude through the holes. They are then cut with a knife to the length of around 4 cm, ready to be cooked in a rich broth. As an alternative to the traditional 'passatelli tool', you can use a potato masher with large holes .

Prepare a rich beef or chicken broth with a stalk of celery, a small onion, a carrot and a tomato.

Beat the eggs with a fork and add the grated Parmesan cheese, the bread crumbs, a pinch of salt, nutmeg, pepper and the lemon zest.

Mix the ingredients until the mixture is firm but elastic (if it is too hard and dry, add a little broth to soften it). Set aside to rest in a tea towel for 5 minutes, then take a bit of dough at a time and either use the passatelli tool to make them or pass the dough through a masher using the disk with large holes.

Cut with a knife once the passatelli are about 4 cm long and spread them on a clean tea towel without overlapping them.

Bring the broth to a boil and pour in the passatelli. When they start to float to the surface take them out and put them in a bowl and add some broth. Serve them with grated Parmesan cheese on top.


How to prepare Passatelli (Homemade pasta nuggets) in broth

To prepare passatelli, start by heating a good meat broth. While it's cooking, grate the lemon zest (being careful not to grate the white part, which is bitter), and set it aside 1 . Do the same with the eggs, beat them for a few moments in a bowl together with a pinch of salt and set aside 2 . In a larger bowl, pour the breadcrumbs and grated Parmesan cheese 3 .

Add the lemon zest 4 , season with grated nutmeg 5 and pour in the eggs 6 .

Mix the ingredients with the help of a spatula 7 or by hand if desired, and mix until the dough is elastic and compact 8 . If it is too dry, add a very small quantity of broth if it is too soft, add some breadcrumbs. Wrap the dough with plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours 9 . This will make the mixture more compact and prevent the passatelli from coming apart while cooking.

Once the dough has finished resting, mash with a potato masher with wide holes 10 directly into the boiling broth 11 .Use the blade of a knife to cut the passatelli to a length of approximately 1 1/2 inches (4 cm) 12 .

Cook your passatelli 13 . As soon as they rise to the surface, transfer them to a serving plate 14 . Serve the passatelli in hot broth 15 , top with grated Parmesan cheese and freshly ground black pepper if desired!


Recipe: Passatelli in Brodo (AKA Parmesan Noodles in Wonderful Chicken Broth)

My first taste of this dish in Emilia Romagna awoke a hunger in me that I didn’t know I had. A new desire was immediately satisfied. Spoonfuls of broth, some gorgeous textured parmesan noodles, and repeat. Until the bowl is empty and the world feels sad. But, then you have more, and the cycle starts again. Passatelli in brodo is rich and light, sustaining and so satisfying.

I adore chicken soup but this is so much more. This is chicken broth with noodles made from parmesan, nutmeg and breadcrumbs coasting inside. Why aren’t we all obsessed with this? Why isn’t it one of those dishes that every one talks about? Deeply flavoured and rich in umami, passatelli bring this chicken soup to life and soothe unlike any other.

I first learned to make this in a hands on pasta class at La Piazzetta del Gusto in Nonantola, a gorgeous local restaurant in a pretty small town near Modena. The town square is full of elderly men chatting and passing the time jovially. Just beyond it is La Piazzetta del Gusto, a restaurant and a pasta shop. All the pasta is rolled by hand every day, and the restaurant itself specialises in passatelli.



Passatelli? I was intrigued. We started with hand rolled tortelloni, then out came the breadcrumbs, parmesan, flour, eggs and nutmeg, which we kneaded lightly to makes passatelli dough. These are so easy. Once the dough is made, you push it through a passatelli press, old style or more commonly now a potato press with large holes, also used for passatelli, and snip the noodles over and into the water. So good.

There are many ways that you can serve them, my favourite is with a classic chicken broth. A winter dish in Emilia Romagna, primarily, I think it suits our 4 seasons in a day summer quite well too.

Passatelli recipe adapted from La Piazzetta del Gusto in Nonantola, Emilia Romagna

Recipe: Passatelli in Brodo (AKA Parmesan Noodles in Wonderful Chicken Broth)

Ingredients

Passatelli (enough for two generous portions)

75g breadcrumbs
85g parmesan
2 eggs
25g pasta flour
sea salt
fresh grated nutmeg
a passatelli press / potato press (I bought this passatelli press on Amazon)

Chicken broth (more than you need – you can freeze leftovers!)

a large pot – I have a home stock pot which I use lots and recommending investing in
Raw chicken – approx 1.5kg carcasses, whole chicken (save the meat for another use if using this) or chicken wings (perfect as have lots of skin and fat so superb flavour)
6 carrots, coarsely chopped
4 sticks celery, coarsely chopped
3 onions, peeled & coarsely chopped
6 cloves garlic
2 bay leaves
a teaspoon of peppercorns (I used white as that is what I had, black are good too)

Method

Make your chicken broth by putting all ingredients into a pot that will fit them, and topping up with water until everything is just covered. Cover with a lit and boil for at least 2 hours, the longer the better. Strain when done and season to taste with sea salt.
Leave to the side. (If using a whole chicken, remove the meat from the carcass and save for another use).

Make your passatelli by combining everything in a bowl and bringing together to a soft pliable dough.

Heat enough stock for more than two bowls of soup and press the passatelli into it, cutting with a knife when a few inches long. The passatelli will rise to the top, and will be ready to eat a couple of minutes later. If you are making just for one, only press enough into the soup for you, and then press them onto a board, lightly flour, and store on a single layer to use within 3 days. The passatelli become flabby when left in the broth, so best to do it this way.

I visited Emilia Romagna as part of Blogville, sponsored by the Emilia Romagna Tourist Board in partnership with iambassador. I maintain full editorial control of the content published, as always. I wouldn’t waste your time, or my own!


Passatelli recipe

fresh eggs, 3
grated Parmesan cheese, 130g
fine breadcrumbs, 120g
salt, a pinch
nutmeg and/or lemon zest to taste
flour, 1 tablespoon (see tips above recipe)

In a bowl, beat the eggs lightly with a fork.

Add Parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs, salt, nutmeg or lemon zest to form a homogeneous ball-shaped dough. First mix the ingredients with a fork, then use your hands.

Wrap in cling film and leave to rest 10 minutes to half an hour. During this short rest period, the dough becomes firm and less sticky (if you have problems, solve them by reading the Food tips above the recipe).

Passatelli in broth.

Cut the dough into 2 or 3 pieces, place each piece in the ricer and mash, dropping the passatelli, short or long depending on how you like it, directly into the meat stock. Use a knife to cut the passatelli so that they fall into the broth without breaking. When they rise to the surface they are ready.

Serve the passatelli hot with grated Parmesan cheese on the side.

Passatelli “asciutti” or fried.

Let the dough rest for a longer time, in the fridge and wrapped in cling film, even an hour or two. Passatelli “asciutti” or fried need a firmer, more compact dough so they don’t break into crumbs. Use gentleness when seasoning.

After resting, cut the dough into 2 or 3 pieces, place each piece in the appropriate tool and flatten, placing the passatelli on a tray dusted with a little semolina flour.

With the help of a spatula transfer the raw passatelli directly into the boiling oil (they are ready in a few minutes) or into the pan with the sauce and, stirring gently, let the sauce embrace the passatelli. Be careful, it is a dough that “drinks”, that is, it tends to absorb the liquid part of the sauce, so keep a cup and a ladle with a little cooking water or broth ready to add when needed.


Passatelli recipe

fresh eggs, 3
grated Parmesan cheese, 130g
fine breadcrumbs, 120g
salt, a pinch
nutmeg and/or lemon zest to taste
flour, 1 tablespoon (see tips above recipe)

In a bowl, beat the eggs lightly with a fork.

Add Parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs, salt, nutmeg or lemon zest to form a homogeneous ball-shaped dough. First mix the ingredients with a fork, then use your hands.

Wrap in cling film and leave to rest 10 minutes to half an hour. During this short rest period, the dough becomes firm and less sticky (if you have problems, solve them by reading the Food tips above the recipe).

Passatelli in broth.

Cut the dough into 2 or 3 pieces, place each piece in the ricer and mash, dropping the passatelli, short or long depending on how you like it, directly into the meat stock. Use a knife to cut the passatelli so that they fall into the broth without breaking. When they rise to the surface they are ready.

Serve the passatelli hot with grated Parmesan cheese on the side.

Passatelli “asciutti” or fried.

Let the dough rest for a longer time, in the fridge and wrapped in cling film, even an hour or two. Passatelli “asciutti” or fried need a firmer, more compact dough so they don’t break into crumbs. Use gentleness when seasoning.

After resting, cut the dough into 2 or 3 pieces, place each piece in the appropriate tool and flatten, placing the passatelli on a tray dusted with a little semolina flour.

With the help of a spatula transfer the raw passatelli directly into the boiling oil (they are ready in a few minutes) or into the pan with the sauce and, stirring gently, let the sauce embrace the passatelli. Be careful, it is a dough that “drinks”, that is, it tends to absorb the liquid part of the sauce, so keep a cup and a ladle with a little cooking water or broth ready to add when needed.