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Drinking History: The 15 Oldest Bars in the World

Drinking History: The 15 Oldest Bars in the World

It’s not unusual to pass a bar these days with a front sign that says “Est. 2014.” You want to be able to go up to the owners of that bar and tell them that it’s not necessarily impressive that they haven’t had the time to fail yet, and that, unless they are playing the long game and have the idea of using that exact same sign for a few hundred years, it’s not necessarily the best advertising technique either.

Drinking History: The 15 Oldest Bars in the World (Slideshow)

What’s alluring about “Established” signs is not the fact that something was as some point established, but the year it was established in. What’s alluring is the time that has passed with that establishment sitting there in that exact spot. What’s alluring is the thought of great local citizens having drunk in the same spot as you, possibly imbibing the same traditional drinks. The “Established” sign is like saying “George Washington ate here,” but instead of it just being George Washington, it’s potentially every person of note who passed by in the intervening years.

In the United States, this doesn’t mean as much as it does in Europe or the rest of the world; in a city like London, where so many great people have lived and died, “Established” signs that commonly will date back hundreds of years hint at a much grander story, and it’s a story that they simply won’t tell. You just have to imagine what great poets, kings, and criminals sat in your very barstool.

That is why the world’s oldest bars are so impressive. They may date back more than centuries: they may date back millennia. They may have slipped in and out of memory over the course of time, but they haven’t budged. This is why we’ve decided to make a list of the world’s oldest bars, though it turns out that’s a tougher task than you might expect: first off, many bars simply don’t have the documentation to prove how old they are, and second, many bars may have spent periods of time not as public houses or restaurants, but as domiciles or derelict buildings. So here are some of the world’s oldest bars, as close as we can approximate, and as close as the good folks at Guinness World Records can confirm.

Matt Hershberger is a contributing writer to The Daily Meal. You can follow him at @MattHershberger

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar

The oldest continuously occupied bar in the United States is Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar in the French Quarter of New Orleans. It’s young compared to the other bars on our list, having been founded in 1772 — but it was purportedly once owned by the pirate Jean Lafitte, who supposedly planned raids there. Lafitte was an illicit slave-runner, and he called the shop a “Blacksmith” shop because Lafitte’s Pirate Shop probably would have drawn the attention of the authorities.

White Horse Tavern

The oldest tavern in America period is the White Horse Tavern in Newport, Rhode Island, which was constructed around 1673. It was another pirate hangout, but most notably was used as a boarding house for British soldiers during the American Revolutionary War. The building eventually was sold and turned into a rooming house in 1895, but was bought and turned back into a pub in 1957. This period in between is why Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar technically gets disqualified from definitive “oldest bar” distinction.

Want to enjoy a drink in one of the world's oldest bars? Read here for more.


The 15 Oldest Bars in the United States

We’ve often asked where the oldest bar in the US is. Those who have been to Europe know the appeal of the cozy retro bar. Why go to these places when there are new establishments that are pulsating with new and cool beats? That’s because longevity says a lot about a bar. People get tired of nightspots too quickly, and if you find one that has survived the test of time, then there must be something special about it. We can only assume that their beers are laced with gold because bars don’t generally have a long lifespan. Unless you’re the only tavern at the very top of the mountain, give or take 5 years and you’re done.

Just like the 7 wonders of the world, these bars should be on your bucket list. Visit any of these and see what makes it so special. Could it be the amazing service? How ‘bout that sizzling-hot bartender that serves you your poison? Or, are the prices in the menu much like peanuts compared to the other bars in the area? Whatever the reason may be, it’s now your job to find out the winning formula for these longstanding but nonetheless trendy bars:

15. Ye Olde Trail Tavern

Address: 228 Xenia Ave, Yellow Springs, OH 45387, United States

This place offers a casual dining experience to everyone. It’s sure to have something on the menu that will attract you. And while the name sounds a little too historic and ancient, it offers modern amenities with a touch of old-world class to its customers. It’s a great venue for parties, especially if you’re planning on a themed one. The tavern is definitely as faithful as it sounds.


28 HongKong Street was created to rival New York's growing cocktail bar scene.

It boasts a host of world-class bartenders, including Michael Callahan, 2011 U.S. Bartenders’ Guild Cocktail World Cup winner Peter Chua, a Diageo Reserve World Class Bartender of the Year finalist the recently signed David Cordoba, a global ambassador for Bacardi and Bacardi ambassador Arijit Bose, who will become head bartender.

At 28 HongKong Street, cocktail ingredients are always fresh — sometimes so fresh they're grown right on the rooftop.


The 50 best bars in Singapore

From swanky wine bars to innovative cocktail joints, these top 50 bars prove why Singapore has the best drinking scene in Asia. Bottoms up!

November 2020: We might not be able to drink past 10.30pm nowadays, but that doesn&rsquot mean that happy hour has to stop. Let us raise a (virtual) toast to the tenacious bars around town &ndash both seasoned and new entrants.

Welcome to the Time Out DRINK List, our handpicked &lsquobest of&rsquo Singapore&rsquos drinking scene. These are the most buzzing bars in this city right now: the most inventive and most memorable watering holes, all ranked by expert local editors. Drinking in Singapore is expensive so we did all the hard work for you &ndash scouring the city every night in search of amazing drinks.

Whether you sip or quaff, these are the city's top bars for a boozy night out. We've got joints stocked with quality vino, speakeasies hidden behind unmarked doors, dens devoted to whisky, craft beer breweries and much more in our roundup. We guarantee you won't be able to stop at one drink &ndash just make sure you have a safe ride home.

Drank somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDrinkList. You can also find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews bars here.


15 Of The World’s Oldest Bars (The Beer’s Fresh, Though)

This article is from Thrillist Nation

For some, traveling is about soaking in local culture. For others, it&rsquos soaking in local booze. Hit two birds with one stone at any of these 15 truly old-school establishments &ndash most of which are older than America, have seen crusaders pass through on the way to the Holy Land, and where happy hour meant living to see another day without getting burned at the stake.

Lafitte&rsquos Blacksmith Shop Bar — est. 1722
New Orleans, LA

This wooden shack is reputed to be the oldest structure used as a bar in the US.
Fun fact: It&rsquos also said to be the site of the Lafitte Brothers&rsquo Barataria smuggling operation.

White Horse Tavern — est. 1673
Newport, RI

A private home from 1652 to 1673, it&rsquos called the White Horse Tavern because back in the day not everyone could read, and a white horse signified a tavern.
Fun fact: It&rsquos allegedly the birthplace of the modern business lunch in 1708 city councilors had lunch here and charged their meals to the public treasury. Nice one, guys.

Ye Olde Man & Scythe — est. 1251
Bolton, England

This pub&rsquos name derives from the crest of the Pilkington family that owned it legend has it that an ancestor, being persecuted after Norman Conquest, disguised himself as a mower and escaped.
Fun fact: James Stanley, 7th Earl of Derby, had his last meal here before stepping outside to be beheaded for his involvement in the Bolton Massacre (when royal-led forces stormed the town and killed over 1,600 people). We hope the food was good.

The Brazen Head — est. 1198
Dublin, Ireland

This former coach house was a fave among, well, any old Irishman you&rsquove ever heard of… Notable examples include James Joyce, Brendan Behan, Jonathan Swift, Robert Emmet, and Wolfe Tone (epic name).
Fun fact: Allegedly, Robin Hood knocked one back here. For the good of the poor, surely.

Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem — est. 1189
Nottingham, England

Brits have a pretty epic drinking culture, which clearly dates way back. Allegedly, crusaders on their way to the Holy Land liked to make a pitstop here, and it&rsquos rumored that Richard the Lionheart himself had a pint here.
Fun facts: a) It&rsquos apparently haunted b) It&rsquos built next to a bunch of caves, which were used as a brewery as far back as the 11th century, and now contain a drinking room. Like drinking in caves? Then check this out.

The Bingley Arms — est. 953
North Leeds, England

This pub is the oldest in Britain (no thank you, Guinness), and while official records say it opened in 953AD, evidence suggests it may go back as far as 905AD.
Fun fact: Formerly The Priests Inn, this pub claims to have served as a safe house for persecuted Catholic priests (and also as a courthouse).

Sean&rsquos Bar — est. 900
Athlone, Ireland

The Guinness Book of World Records claims that Sean&rsquos Bar is the oldest pub in Ireland, if not the world. Renovations found that the walls were even made from wattle and wicker, which is both fun to say and very, very ye-oldy-worldy.
Fun fact: Boy George owned Sean&rsquos in 1987.

Hatchet Inn — est. 1606
Bristol, England

The Hatchet Inn is believed to be named for the many local woodsmen that frequented it.
Fun fact: Locals whisper that underneath layers of paint, one of the doors is coated in human flesh. So maybe that&rsquos where the name came from.

Hofbräuhaus — est. 1589
Munich, Germany

Founded by the Duke of Bavaria, this brewery is now owned by the Bavarian state government.
Fun fact: What do Mozart, Lenin, and Hitler all have in common? They loved the Hofbräuhaus. Also, during the Thirty Years&rsquo War in 1632, King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden invaded Bavaria and threatened to burn Munich to the ground&hellip but agreed to nix that plan if the city surrendered some hostages — and 600,000 barrels of Hofbräuhaus beer.

Ye Olde Mitre Tavern — est. 1546
Holborn, England

Originally a watering hole for the help (the servants of the Bishops of Ely), this place is most famous for housing a cherry tree that Queen Elizabeth once danced around with Sir Christopher Hatton (Brits, who knows).
Fun fact: Martyrs and traitors and thieves and whoever were hung pretty much on its doorstep.

Herberg Vlissinghe — est. 1515
Bruges, Belgium

This bar was a fave hangout for artists.
Fun fact: Local lore has it that Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens dined and dashed here by painting a fake coin on the table.

Al Brindisi — est. 1435
Ferrara, Italy

Guinness calls this wine bar the oldest osteria in the world.
Fun fact: Copernicus (yeah, the astronomer guy who figured out that the sun was the center of the universe) lived upstairs and was a regular here.

Zum Franziskaner — est. 1421
Stockholm, Sweden

This beer cellar/ resto was imported to Sweden by German monks who knew what was up. Today, it features an eclectic mix of German and Swedish specialties.
Fun fact: They have their very own Weissbier.

Brauhaus Sion — est. 1318
Cologne, Germany

This place&rsquos specialty is their Kölsch beer, which, much like champagne, is a local delicacy that must be brewed exclusively in and around Cologne to be called a Kölsch.
Fun fact: The only thing that ever got between this brewery&rsquos golden nectar and a thirsty German was WWII — in 1942 it was totally destroyed, and couldn&rsquot be rebuilt until 1951.

Kyteler’s Inn — est. 1324
Kilkenny, Ireland

We can&rsquot even imagine the amount of Kilkenny that’s been poured inside these walls.
Fun fact: Founder Alice de Kyteler married four times, getting richer with each divorce (as one does). She was eventually accused of witchcraft and sentenced to burn at the stake, but escaped to England before that could happen.


Explore One of Juarez, Mexico's Oldest Bars: The World Famous Kentucky Club

Juarez, Mexico use to be pretty raunchy. When we began going at 17 or 18 years old, the main strip (Juarez Avenue) was made up of bar after bar it was a 3 lane, one-way street lined on both sides with flashing neon signs and rhythmic beating from speakers pointed out to the street.

Then in 2010 Juarez became the murder capital of the world. Thousands of people died in this city as an outcome of a violent war between two rival drug gangs. As a result, tourism - the economic driving force of this part of city - all but dried up.

The nightclubs were shut down the neon lights were turned off.

At some point, the Mexican Government clamped down. They razed Juarez Avenue, getting rid of virtually anything that could be used by the cartels and forever changing what we used to know. And we were surprised, now in 2015 as we walked over the bridge to this border city, to find the buildings on each side of the strip painted a clean white. There were 15 foot sidewalks on either side of Juarez Avenue, clean and free from the grit and grime the previous concrete had worn. There was no foul smell. There were no taxi drivers offering to drive us to "the girls" or "the donkey show" (use your imagination).

Instead we saw the following, in order: dentist office, eye-doctor, pharmacy. This pattern repeated itself for blocks, broken on occasion by the rare souvenir shop or bank or some other random business. And we counted about five bars on the whole of Juarez Avenue from the bridge to the main square just blocks from the cathedral.

But at one point we came to a building with a large painted window exclaiming the "World Famous Kentucky Club" and so we ducked in.

It takes a moment for the eyes to adjust to the dull green lanterns inside, but when they do you find a saloon that could be just as at home in Lower Manhattan as it is here. There's a long bar reaching out in front of you to the dark recesses in the back. There were a handful of flat screen televisions scattered around, each tuned to ESPN. One man sat on a bar stool, looking out the door at the passersby and nursing a beer. Three or four waiters and bartenders milled about, washing glasses, exchanging stories and laughing. It was quiet, dark and peaceful.

Behind the long bar sits a rich, coffee-brown and ornately carved bar back, stretching up to the ceiling, holding an array of tequila bottles and large, heavy mirrors. It was carved in France in 1935 specifically for the Kentucky Club and shipped to Juarez to be assembled here. It's graced the bar ever since.

The bar itself sits on a tiled wall that sports a pretty old feature - a trough running the length of it. If you're not familiar with these they sit just above the floor, right below your feet if you're sitting. But understand there was a time when you didn't sit at a bar you stood. And if a man didn't want to leave the bar and had to relieve himself, the trough was convenient. We didn't examine it too closely, but we don't think it'd been used in a while.

All in all, the Kentucky Club wears its 96 years like a cherished piece of antique furniture - with patina and a few scars, but graceful and proud nonetheless.

Founded in 1920 the Kentucky Club was opened two years into prohibition. It was a wise business decision. Being only a short walk from downtown El Paso, Texas, USA, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico was ready and willing to help thirsty Americans quench their thirst.

And apparently the Kentucky Club was one of the finest. This is evident from the array of local and Mexican celebrities whose portraits line the walls and who were kept tipsy here.

Picture after picture show smiling Matadors and members of the local Juarez baseball team - part of the Mexican League formed in 1925 - all perched in dusty frames along the side wall above small, intimate booths.

There were also a number of celebrities, from the 1920s on, who have visited this classy bar. A number of movies, especially cheaply made westerns, were shot in the area, and so for thirsty movie stars it was an almost sure thing that they'd turn up at the Kentucky Club. The list includes the likes of John Wayne and Steve McQueen. It's easy to picture them drinking here.

The place was well known to many other dignitaries passing through as well, especially after bartender, Lorenzo "Lencho" Hernandez reportedly created what became their signature drink, the Margarita, in the 1930s.

Now this is one of about four Margarita-invention stories out there, and possibly one of the most recent. It's pretty unlikely that it was invented here (as opposed to Ensenada or Acapulco). But in any case the drink is well made at the Kentucky Club, using the classic recipe of tequila, sweetened lime juice and a bit of Controy (Mexican orange liqueur) served in a rocks glass with a salted rim.

And the price certainly couldn't be better. We paid $3.00 each for a Margarita and a beer. Across the border that would have cost about $12.00.

The look and feel of this place is all East Coast, big city cocktail bar - not border city cantina. You could take this place and drop it in Chicago, Boston or New York and it'd feel about the same - with the exception of the few nods to their Mexican heritage, like the giant, dust covered, stuffed Hawk perched facing the bar (which has probably been there since opening).

We didn't try the food but they do have a full kitchen and it smelled great. The condition of the bar is clean and warm. The ambiance is a bit dark, but secure and safe.

To be honest we weren't sure what we'd find when we made the trek to the Kentucky Club. The drug war this town saw closed many of the businesses in the cross-fire: as the tourists stayed across the border many of these businesses slowly faded away. We were afraid the Kentucky Club was another casualty. Luckily though, it's persevered.

This is not the Juarez we knew, and it's certainly not the type of bar we used to go to here. This place has class, and it's a place we hope to go to many more times in the future.

If you ever make it to El Paso, do yourself a favor and steel your nerves, walk over the bridge, and have a Margarita at the Kentucky Club.

Where: The World Famous Kentucky Club, Calle Juárez S/N, Centro, 32000 Juárez, Chih., Mexico. (If you want to see something fun, use Google Map's Street View to see what Juarez USED to look like, it was recorded in 2009). Be sure to bring your passport when you visit, you'll need it to get back across the border.

When: The region is graced with great weather so there's no bad time of the year. We have no idea what this place is like at night, but by the looks of things it's certainly much tamer than it used to be. The bar opens about noon and stays open until about 1am.

What to drink: A Margarita is a must. If you've done that, or want something different, ask for a classic drink, an Old Fashioned or the like, they'll know how to make it.


15 Of The World’s Oldest Bars (The Beer’s Fresh, Though)

This article is from Thrillist Nation

For some, traveling is about soaking in local culture. For others, it&rsquos soaking in local booze. Hit two birds with one stone at any of these 15 truly old-school establishments &ndash most of which are older than America, have seen crusaders pass through on the way to the Holy Land, and where happy hour meant living to see another day without getting burned at the stake.

Lafitte&rsquos Blacksmith Shop Bar — est. 1722
New Orleans, LA

This wooden shack is reputed to be the oldest structure used as a bar in the US.
Fun fact: It&rsquos also said to be the site of the Lafitte Brothers&rsquo Barataria smuggling operation.

White Horse Tavern — est. 1673
Newport, RI

A private home from 1652 to 1673, it&rsquos called the White Horse Tavern because back in the day not everyone could read, and a white horse signified a tavern.
Fun fact: It&rsquos allegedly the birthplace of the modern business lunch in 1708 city councilors had lunch here and charged their meals to the public treasury. Nice one, guys.

Ye Olde Man & Scythe — est. 1251
Bolton, England

This pub&rsquos name derives from the crest of the Pilkington family that owned it legend has it that an ancestor, being persecuted after Norman Conquest, disguised himself as a mower and escaped.
Fun fact: James Stanley, 7th Earl of Derby, had his last meal here before stepping outside to be beheaded for his involvement in the Bolton Massacre (when royal-led forces stormed the town and killed over 1,600 people). We hope the food was good.

The Brazen Head — est. 1198
Dublin, Ireland

This former coach house was a fave among, well, any old Irishman you&rsquove ever heard of… Notable examples include James Joyce, Brendan Behan, Jonathan Swift, Robert Emmet, and Wolfe Tone (epic name).
Fun fact: Allegedly, Robin Hood knocked one back here. For the good of the poor, surely.

Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem — est. 1189
Nottingham, England

Brits have a pretty epic drinking culture, which clearly dates way back. Allegedly, crusaders on their way to the Holy Land liked to make a pitstop here, and it&rsquos rumored that Richard the Lionheart himself had a pint here.
Fun facts: a) It&rsquos apparently haunted b) It&rsquos built next to a bunch of caves, which were used as a brewery as far back as the 11th century, and now contain a drinking room. Like drinking in caves? Then check this out.

The Bingley Arms — est. 953
North Leeds, England

This pub is the oldest in Britain (no thank you, Guinness), and while official records say it opened in 953AD, evidence suggests it may go back as far as 905AD.
Fun fact: Formerly The Priests Inn, this pub claims to have served as a safe house for persecuted Catholic priests (and also as a courthouse).

Sean&rsquos Bar — est. 900
Athlone, Ireland

The Guinness Book of World Records claims that Sean&rsquos Bar is the oldest pub in Ireland, if not the world. Renovations found that the walls were even made from wattle and wicker, which is both fun to say and very, very ye-oldy-worldy.
Fun fact: Boy George owned Sean&rsquos in 1987.

Hatchet Inn — est. 1606
Bristol, England

The Hatchet Inn is believed to be named for the many local woodsmen that frequented it.
Fun fact: Locals whisper that underneath layers of paint, one of the doors is coated in human flesh. So maybe that&rsquos where the name came from.

Hofbräuhaus — est. 1589
Munich, Germany

Founded by the Duke of Bavaria, this brewery is now owned by the Bavarian state government.
Fun fact: What do Mozart, Lenin, and Hitler all have in common? They loved the Hofbräuhaus. Also, during the Thirty Years&rsquo War in 1632, King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden invaded Bavaria and threatened to burn Munich to the ground&hellip but agreed to nix that plan if the city surrendered some hostages — and 600,000 barrels of Hofbräuhaus beer.

Ye Olde Mitre Tavern — est. 1546
Holborn, England

Originally a watering hole for the help (the servants of the Bishops of Ely), this place is most famous for housing a cherry tree that Queen Elizabeth once danced around with Sir Christopher Hatton (Brits, who knows).
Fun fact: Martyrs and traitors and thieves and whoever were hung pretty much on its doorstep.

Herberg Vlissinghe — est. 1515
Bruges, Belgium

This bar was a fave hangout for artists.
Fun fact: Local lore has it that Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens dined and dashed here by painting a fake coin on the table.

Al Brindisi — est. 1435
Ferrara, Italy

Guinness calls this wine bar the oldest osteria in the world.
Fun fact: Copernicus (yeah, the astronomer guy who figured out that the sun was the center of the universe) lived upstairs and was a regular here.

Zum Franziskaner — est. 1421
Stockholm, Sweden

This beer cellar/ resto was imported to Sweden by German monks who knew what was up. Today, it features an eclectic mix of German and Swedish specialties.
Fun fact: They have their very own Weissbier.

Brauhaus Sion — est. 1318
Cologne, Germany

This place&rsquos specialty is their Kölsch beer, which, much like champagne, is a local delicacy that must be brewed exclusively in and around Cologne to be called a Kölsch.
Fun fact: The only thing that ever got between this brewery&rsquos golden nectar and a thirsty German was WWII — in 1942 it was totally destroyed, and couldn&rsquot be rebuilt until 1951.

Kyteler’s Inn — est. 1324
Kilkenny, Ireland

We can&rsquot even imagine the amount of Kilkenny that’s been poured inside these walls.
Fun fact: Founder Alice de Kyteler married four times, getting richer with each divorce (as one does). She was eventually accused of witchcraft and sentenced to burn at the stake, but escaped to England before that could happen.


15 Of The World’s Oldest Bars (The Beer’s Fresh, Though)

This article is from Thrillist Nation

For some, traveling is about soaking in local culture. For others, it&rsquos soaking in local booze. Hit two birds with one stone at any of these 15 truly old-school establishments &ndash most of which are older than America, have seen crusaders pass through on the way to the Holy Land, and where happy hour meant living to see another day without getting burned at the stake.

Lafitte&rsquos Blacksmith Shop Bar — est. 1722
New Orleans, LA

This wooden shack is reputed to be the oldest structure used as a bar in the US.
Fun fact: It&rsquos also said to be the site of the Lafitte Brothers&rsquo Barataria smuggling operation.

White Horse Tavern — est. 1673
Newport, RI

A private home from 1652 to 1673, it&rsquos called the White Horse Tavern because back in the day not everyone could read, and a white horse signified a tavern.
Fun fact: It&rsquos allegedly the birthplace of the modern business lunch in 1708 city councilors had lunch here and charged their meals to the public treasury. Nice one, guys.

Ye Olde Man & Scythe — est. 1251
Bolton, England

This pub&rsquos name derives from the crest of the Pilkington family that owned it legend has it that an ancestor, being persecuted after Norman Conquest, disguised himself as a mower and escaped.
Fun fact: James Stanley, 7th Earl of Derby, had his last meal here before stepping outside to be beheaded for his involvement in the Bolton Massacre (when royal-led forces stormed the town and killed over 1,600 people). We hope the food was good.

The Brazen Head — est. 1198
Dublin, Ireland

This former coach house was a fave among, well, any old Irishman you&rsquove ever heard of… Notable examples include James Joyce, Brendan Behan, Jonathan Swift, Robert Emmet, and Wolfe Tone (epic name).
Fun fact: Allegedly, Robin Hood knocked one back here. For the good of the poor, surely.

Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem — est. 1189
Nottingham, England

Brits have a pretty epic drinking culture, which clearly dates way back. Allegedly, crusaders on their way to the Holy Land liked to make a pitstop here, and it&rsquos rumored that Richard the Lionheart himself had a pint here.
Fun facts: a) It&rsquos apparently haunted b) It&rsquos built next to a bunch of caves, which were used as a brewery as far back as the 11th century, and now contain a drinking room. Like drinking in caves? Then check this out.

The Bingley Arms — est. 953
North Leeds, England

This pub is the oldest in Britain (no thank you, Guinness), and while official records say it opened in 953AD, evidence suggests it may go back as far as 905AD.
Fun fact: Formerly The Priests Inn, this pub claims to have served as a safe house for persecuted Catholic priests (and also as a courthouse).

Sean&rsquos Bar — est. 900
Athlone, Ireland

The Guinness Book of World Records claims that Sean&rsquos Bar is the oldest pub in Ireland, if not the world. Renovations found that the walls were even made from wattle and wicker, which is both fun to say and very, very ye-oldy-worldy.
Fun fact: Boy George owned Sean&rsquos in 1987.

Hatchet Inn — est. 1606
Bristol, England

The Hatchet Inn is believed to be named for the many local woodsmen that frequented it.
Fun fact: Locals whisper that underneath layers of paint, one of the doors is coated in human flesh. So maybe that&rsquos where the name came from.

Hofbräuhaus — est. 1589
Munich, Germany

Founded by the Duke of Bavaria, this brewery is now owned by the Bavarian state government.
Fun fact: What do Mozart, Lenin, and Hitler all have in common? They loved the Hofbräuhaus. Also, during the Thirty Years&rsquo War in 1632, King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden invaded Bavaria and threatened to burn Munich to the ground&hellip but agreed to nix that plan if the city surrendered some hostages — and 600,000 barrels of Hofbräuhaus beer.

Ye Olde Mitre Tavern — est. 1546
Holborn, England

Originally a watering hole for the help (the servants of the Bishops of Ely), this place is most famous for housing a cherry tree that Queen Elizabeth once danced around with Sir Christopher Hatton (Brits, who knows).
Fun fact: Martyrs and traitors and thieves and whoever were hung pretty much on its doorstep.

Herberg Vlissinghe — est. 1515
Bruges, Belgium

This bar was a fave hangout for artists.
Fun fact: Local lore has it that Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens dined and dashed here by painting a fake coin on the table.

Al Brindisi — est. 1435
Ferrara, Italy

Guinness calls this wine bar the oldest osteria in the world.
Fun fact: Copernicus (yeah, the astronomer guy who figured out that the sun was the center of the universe) lived upstairs and was a regular here.

Zum Franziskaner — est. 1421
Stockholm, Sweden

This beer cellar/ resto was imported to Sweden by German monks who knew what was up. Today, it features an eclectic mix of German and Swedish specialties.
Fun fact: They have their very own Weissbier.

Brauhaus Sion — est. 1318
Cologne, Germany

This place&rsquos specialty is their Kölsch beer, which, much like champagne, is a local delicacy that must be brewed exclusively in and around Cologne to be called a Kölsch.
Fun fact: The only thing that ever got between this brewery&rsquos golden nectar and a thirsty German was WWII — in 1942 it was totally destroyed, and couldn&rsquot be rebuilt until 1951.

Kyteler’s Inn — est. 1324
Kilkenny, Ireland

We can&rsquot even imagine the amount of Kilkenny that’s been poured inside these walls.
Fun fact: Founder Alice de Kyteler married four times, getting richer with each divorce (as one does). She was eventually accused of witchcraft and sentenced to burn at the stake, but escaped to England before that could happen.


Contents

The most common minimum age to purchase alcohol in Africa is 18. However, Angola (except Luanda Province), Central African Republic, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, and Togo have no laws on the books restricting the sale of alcohol to minors. In Libya, Somalia and Sudan the sale, production and consumption of alcohol is completely prohibited. [ improper synthesis? ]

It is prohibited to sell alcohol beverages to anyone under the age of 18. It is also prohibited for minors to buy and consume alcohol. [8]

  • Article 8 of the decree of 10 June 1942 regulating the production, import, advertisement, sale, and consumption of alcohol beverages in French West Africa, prohibits the sale or free supply of alcohol beverages to minors under 20.
  • Article 13 stipulates fines ranging from CFAF 200,000 to CFAF 1 million for such offences, doubled in the case of repeat offences.
  • There are no official measures prohibiting children from consuming alcohol, tobacco or other substances harmful to their health.

The Revised Family Code Proclamation No. 213 (2000) Article 215 defines a minor as anyone who has not attained the full age of 18.

A "young person" is defined as anyone under the age of 17 by the Children and Young Persons Act, 1949 Section 2.

Chapter 113 Licenses Act (2010)

  • Subsidiary Legislation: Licenses (Manufacturing) Regulation (1987), Article 8(5)(page 20):
    • In the case of manufacturing and processing of liquor, tobacco and tobacco products, the license holder shall (i) not deliver or sell liquor to, or allow any consumption of liquor by, any person under the age of 18 years or deliver or sell tobacco or tobacco products or allow it to be used on the premises by such a person
    • (1) The holder of a license, his servant or agent shall not (a) employ or allow a person under the age of 18 years, . (b) sell or deliver liquor, cigarettes or tobacco products to, or allow liquor to be consumed or cigarettes or any tobacco products to be used by any person under the age of 18 years on the premises . (i) admit any person under the age of 18 years to a premises licensed as a public bar, toddy bar or at the premises licensed to manufacture and sell baka or lapire.

    Children's Act Section 78 - It is prohibited for any person to sell, lend, give, supply, deliver or offer alcohol beverages to any child under the age of 16 years, except upon production of a written order signed by the parent or guardian of the child known to such person. The police has the duty to seize any alcohol beverage in the possession of a child under the age of 16 years without a written consent of the parents or legal guardian. [37]

    In Central America, the Caribbean, and South America the legal drinking age and legal purchase age varies from 0 to 20 years (see table below). In South America in particular, the legal purchase age is 18 years, with two exceptions:

    • In Paraguay, the legal drinking age and purchase age is 20 years.
    • In Guyana, minors aged 16 or 17 May consume a glass of beer or wine in a restaurant provided they buy a meal.

    In North America the legal drinking age and legal purchase age varies from 18 to 21 years:

    • In Mexico, it is 18 for each.
    • In the United States, the minimum legal age to purchase any alcohol beverage from a shop, supermarket, liquor store, bar, club or any other licensed premises is 21 years of age the two exceptions are Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands where the age is 18. The legal drinking age varies by state.
    • In Canada, most provinces have a minimum age of 19 years to buy or consume alcohol, while Alberta, Manitoba and Quebec set it at 18 years.

    In the late 20th century, much of North America changed its minimum legal drinking ages (MLDAs) as follows:

    In the 1970s, provincial and state policy makers in Canada and the United States moved to lower MLDAs (which were set at 21 years in most provinces/territories and states) to coincide with the jurisdictional age of majority — typically 18 years of age. As a result, MLDAs were reduced in all Canadian provinces [and] in more than half of US states. In Canada, however, two provinces, Ontario [in 1979] and Saskatchewan [in 1976], quickly raised their subsequent MLDAs from 18 to 19 years in response to a few studies demonstrating an association between the lowered drinking age and increases in alcohol-related harms to youth and young adults, including increases in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) and alcohol intoxication among high school students. Following MLDA reductions in the US, research in several states provided persuasive evidence of sharp increases in rates of fatal and nonfatal MVAs appearing immediately after the implementation of lower drinking ages. These scientific findings galvanized public pressure on lawmakers to raise MLDAs and, in response, the federal government introduced the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, which imposed a reduction of highway funds for states if they did not increase their MLDA to 21 years. All states complied and implemented an MLDA of 21 years by 1988. [38]

    Country State/region/province De jure Notes
    Drinking age Purchase age
    Anguilla None [39] 18 [39] It is prohibited to sell or serve alcohol drinks to anyone under the age of 18 years. Violating the regulation is punished with a $9,600 fine.
    Antigua and Barbuda None 16 [40] The sale and distribution of alcohol to a person under 16 years of age, and purchase by persons under 16 years of age, for consumption in licensed premises are prohibited.
    Argentina None 18 [41]
    Bahamas 18 [42] It is prohibited for any adult to sell, serve or supply any alcohol beverage to a child (defined as anyone under the age of 18 years). The law provides an exception to treat an illness in urgent cases or upon order by a medical doctor.
    Barbados None 16 [43] It is prohibited to sell or serve any alcohol beverage to anyone under the age of 16 years. The President of the Barbados Road Safety Association is trying to raise the drinking age to 18 years because the law is often violated. [43]
    Belize 18 [44] Drinking age is rarely enforced. IDs are almost never requested.
    Bermuda 18 [45] It is prohibited to sell or serve any alcohol beverage to a child under the age of 18 years.
    Bolivia None 18 It is prohibited to sell or serve alcohol beverages to minors under the age of 18 years.

    Law 259 Against the Sale and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages (2012) Article 20

    (16 on-premise for wine or malt liquor with a meal) [62]

    Law prohibiting minors entry to entertainment venues Article 1 prohibits those under the age of 16 from entering cinemas and theaters (except during children's programming), clubs, cafes, or venues licensed to sell alcohol beverages.

    Code of Children and Adolescents Decree 73 (1996)

    Some states do not allow those under the legal drinking age to be present in liquor stores or in bars (usually, the difference between a bar and a restaurant is that food is served only in the latter). Contrary to popular belief, only a few states prohibit minors and young adults from consuming alcohol in private settings.

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism maintains a database that details state-level regulations on consumption and sale age limits. [72]

    Country De jure Notes
    Drinking age Purchase age
    Afghanistan Prohibited [76]
    Bahrain 21 [77]
    Bangladesh 18 [1] 18 for non-Muslims and foreigners. (Muslims require medical prescription for purchasing) [1]
    Bhutan None 18 [78]
    Brunei Restricted to non-Muslims for private consumption
    Prohibited for Muslims and public consumption
    17 for non-Muslims' private residence consumption [1]
    Prohibited [1] Non-Muslims over 17 years of age are allowed to import alcohol not to exceed maximum total volume 2 liters of liquor and 12 cans of beer at 330 ml for personal use, once in 48 hours. This alcohol must be “stored and consumed at the place of residence of the importer” and is “not to be given, transferred or sold to another person.”. [1]
    Cambodia None The Health Ministry drafted a law to regulate the sale and consumption of alcohol in June 2015, with emphasis on establishing a minimum legal purchase age of 21 and preventing underage drinking.

    Ministry of Commerce Decree No. 25 (2006)

    18 in Goa, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Sikkim, and Puducherry

    21 in Andhra Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Chhattisgarh, Jammu and Kashmir, Jharkhand, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Mizoram, Orissa (Odisha), Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Telangana, Tripura, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal and Delhi [82]

    25 in Haryana, Meghalaya, Punjab

    Consumption of alcohol is prohibited in the states of Bihar, Gujarat, Lakshadweep, Manipur, and Nagaland. [83]

    According to a global school health study, 40% of minors over 13 drink alcohol and up to 25% buy it from stores. [90]

    Increased from 18 to 21 in December 2017, effective 16 October 2018. There will be an 18-month grace period for sellers to comply. After the grace period, anyone caught selling to persons under 21 can be fined up to RM10,000 and jailed up to 2 years. [91]

    Malaysian identity cards include a designation of religion, which allows enforcement of the religion-based sales restriction.

    It is also prohibited for minors to purchase, or attempt to purchase alcohol from any licensed premises, in which the minors can also be fined up to $10,000. However, the authorities rarely enforced this on minors.

    It is technically legal for minors to possess and consume alcohol at home and in public (not in any licensed premises) as there is no law prohibiting it. It is also technically legal for someone to purchase alcohol and pass it to minors outside the store or licensed premise. [102]

    The method of calculating the legal age for alcohol slightly differs from Korean age reckoning in which another one year will be added to the person's age, whereas this method only doesn't take into account the month and day of birth but only the year instead. [103]

    No person shall supply alcohol to anyone under the age of 18 (Art 91).

    Parents are required to forbid their children who have not reached age 20 to consume alcohol beverages. [107]

    Previously, expatriate non-Muslim residents had to request a liquor permit to purchase alcohol beverages, but it was prohibited for such holders to provide drinks to others. [112]

    The legal age for drinking alcohol is 18 in Abu Dhabi (although a Ministry of Tourism by-law allows hotels to serve alcohol only to those over 21), and 21 in Dubai and the Northern Emirates (except Sharjah, where drinking alcohol is prohibited). [110]

    It is a punishable offence to drink, or to be under the influence of alcohol, in public. [110]

    Most countries in Europe have set 18 as the minimum age to purchase alcohol. Although Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Gibraltar, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Serbia and Switzerland (except Ticino) maintain a minimum purchase age below 18 years permitting minors either full or limited access to alcohol. In 2005, [116] 2007 [117] and 2015 [118] harmonization at the European Union level toward a minimum purchase age of 18 was discussed, but not agreed.

    Timeline of changes to drinking/purchase age or laws restricting the access to alcohol for minors:

    • In 2002 the Spanish autonomous communities Madrid, [119]Valencia[120] and Catalonia[121] raised their minimum purchase age to 18 years. Previously, Valencia and Madrid had a minimum purchase age of 16 years, and in Catalonia minors aged 16 or 17 could purchase alcohol up to 23% ABV on- and off-premise.
    • In 2004 Denmark[122] raised its off-premise purchase age from 15 to 16 years.
    • In November 2005 Switzerland passed its Food and Commodities Regulation [123] (German: Lebensmittel- und Gebrauchsgegenständeverordnung), introducing a ban on alcohol sales to anyone under the age of 16. The Alcohol Law [124] (German: Alkoholgesetz) passed in 1980 requires a minimum age of 18 years for the retail sale of distilled spirits. Therefore, it is prohibited to sell fermented alcohol (e.g. beer, wine, sparkling wine or cider) to anyone under the age of 16, and any distilled alcohol beverages to anyone under the age of 18 years. The canton of Ticino has a cantonal law since 1989 that makes the purchase age limit for all alcohol beverages 18 years. [125]
    • In 2006 the Spanish autonomous community Castile and León[126] raised its minimum purchase age from 16 to 18 years.
    • In late 2006, Gibraltar[127] lawmakers passed the Children and Young Persons (Alcohol, Tobacco and Gaming) Act 2006, which raised the minimum purchase age from 16 to 18 years. But the new law made an exception: minors aged 16 or 17 can purchase and consume beer, wine or cider under 15% ABV on-premise, and pre-packed containers of an alcohol strength not exceeding 5.5% ABV (e.g. alcopops).
    • In 2009 France[128] raised its minimum purchase age to 18 years, [129][130] and fines were increased for selling or serving alcohol to a minor (up to €7,500). Previously, the minimum age was 16 years for off-premise and on-premise purchases of low-alcohol beverages (up to 3% ABV) such as wine, beer, cider, perry, mead, crème de cassis and juices from fermented fruits or vegetables that contain 1.2 to 3° alcohol, natural sweet wines from controlled cultivation and 18 for higher-ABV beverges.
    • In October 2009, the government of Malta[131] passed a new law raising its drinking and purchase age from 16 to 17 years.
    • In 2010 the Spanish autonomous community of Galicia raised its minimum purchase age from 16 to 18 years. [132]
    • In 2011 Denmark[133] passed a law raising the minimum age for off-premise sale of alcohol beverages of >16.5% ABV to 18 years of age. The minimum age to purchase alcohol beverages of <16.5% ABV remains 16.
    • In March 2012 Moldova raised the minimum purchase age to 18, from 16 previously. [134][135] raised its minimum purchase age from 16 to 18 in 2012. Previously Italy did not have a purchase age for off-premise sales, and the minimum age of 16 years for on-premise sales was not well enforced. [136]
    • In 2013 the government of Portugal restricted alcohol sales to young people: distilled spirits cannot be sold to anyone under the age of 18, and other alcohol beverages (e.g. beer, wine, or cider) cannot be sold to anyone under the age of 16. Previously the minimum age for all alcohol beverages was 16 years. [137]
    • As of 1 January 2014 [update] , the minimum legal purchase and consumption age was raised from 16 to 18 in the Netherlands. Previously young people over the age of 16 could purchase and consume alcohol beverages of <15% ABV, and those aged 18 and over could purchase all alcohol beverages. [138]
    • As of March 2015 [update] , the Spanish autonomous community of Asturias raised its drinking age from 16 to 18 years. Asturias was Spain's last community with a drinking age of 16 years. The new law brings the drinking age into line with the rest of Spain, with the exception of Balearic Islands where no purchase age limit is set. [139]
    • As of December 2015 [update] , Portugal harmonized its minimum drinking age to 18 years across all beverage types. Previously the purchase age was 16 years for low-alcohol beverages such as beer, wine or cider. [140]
    • As of 1 January 2018 [update] , Lithuania raised its minimum drinking age from 18 to 20 years. [141]
    • From January 2019 the federal states of Austria decided to align their drinking and purchase ages. The states Burgenland, Lower Austria and Vienna therefore raised their age limits for alcohol beverages containing spirits to 18. Prior to 2019 these states had a general drinking and purchase age of 16 years. The sale and consumption of beer, wine and other fermented alcohol beverages is now prohibited to children and young people under the age of 16 years, and the sale and consumption of spirits to minors under the age of 18 years is prohibited throughout Austria. [142]

    16 for other alcohol beverages [150]

    • Law on Public Peace and Order (2015) Article 25 prohibits providing alcohol beverages to minors.
    • Law on Internal Trade (2010), Article 10 prohibits the sale in the retail trade of alcohol beverages to persons under 18 years of age.

    If a shop or bar fails to ask for an ID card and is identified having sold alcohol to an underage, it is subject to fine. A national ID card, obtained in the local town hall, can serve as age verification. [158] This card is rarely used though since a passport or driver's license is more commonly used. [159]

    Both the legal drinking and purchasing age in the Faroe Islands is 18. [160]

    Police may search minors in public places and confiscate or destroy any alcohol beverages in their possession. Incidents are reported to the legal guardian and social authorities, who may intervene with child welfare procedures. In addition, those aged 15 or above are subject to a fine. [164]

    In private, offering alcohol to a minor is considered a criminal offence if it results in drunkenness and the act can be deemed reprehensible as a whole, considering the minor's age, degree of maturity and other circumstances. [162]

    • The alcohol beverage is beer, wine or cider below 15% ABV, or
    • The alcohol beverage is served in a bottle, or a pre-packaged container below 5.5% ABV.

    16 other alcohol beverages [176]

    Drinking in public places, with the exception of designated drinking zones, is prohibited regardless of age.


    Leith Bars

    Located to the north of the city, Leith has a thriving bar and pub scene that is well worth exploring. This exciting area of Edinburgh is easily accessible thanks to a 10 minute bus ride, meaning that a great night out in Leith is even closer than you think.

    The Carriers Quarters

    42 Bernard Street, Edinburgh EH6 6PR (Tel: 0131 554 4122)

    This cosy landmark bar can be found on Bernard Street at The Shore. The bar is as famous for its history (the oldest unaltered one in Leith, dating back to 1785) as it is for its steak pies (they sell out quickly!). Perfect for a lazy Sunday afternoon pint or a lively music session of a weekend – The Carriers Quarters is perfectly unpretentious and as traditional as they come.

    [Image credit: Carriers Quarters]

    Nobles Cafe

    44a Constitution Street, Edinburgh EH6 6RS (Tel: 0131 629 7215)

    Nobles Café Bar and Restaurant is a firm favourite with locals and visitors alike. This atmospheric neighbourhood pub, with stained-glass windows and cosy decor, is full of old world charm and modern twists.

    If you're feeling hungry, be sure to pop along and try one of their sumptuous weekend brunches, made with the best local ingredients.

    The Lioness of Leith

    21-25 Duke Street, Edinburgh EH6 8HH (Tel: 0131 629 0580)

    The Lioness of Leith is an old-style Victorian pub just off Leith Links has recently been brought bang up to date with a funky makeover. Its modern art and stylish twists have firmly re-established it as a cult favourite in the area.

    "Burger Mama" was born in early February 2018 offering real gourmet burgers to the people of Leith.

    Got your own favourite bars in Edinburgh you'd like to recommend? Then let us know who you would nominate as your "Best Bars in Edinburgh" on Twitter @edinburgh.

    Forever Edinburgh: Helping you make the most of the best bars in Edinburgh.

    Due to the Covid-19 pandemic many establishments could either be closed or operating reduced hours. Please check with venues directly before you visit.