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German pumpernickel bread recipe

German pumpernickel bread recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Bread
  • Brown bread
  • Rye bread

A hearty German pumpernickel bread recipe made in the bread machine. This goes well with corned beef, cold roast meat and mustard.

96 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 300ml warm water (45 degrees C)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons treacle
  • 190g plain flour
  • 120g rye flour
  • 60g wholemeal flour
  • 4 tablespoons strong bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder
  • 2 teaspoons instant coffee granules
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon caraway seed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried active baking yeast

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:45min ›Extra time:2hr rising › Ready in:3hr

  1. Place ingredients into the pan of the bread machine in the order suggested by the manufacturer. Select Wholemeal cycle, and Start.
  2. After the first rise, remove dough from the machine. Shape, and place into a lightly oiled 2 lb loaf tin. Cover, and let rise for 1 hour.
  3. Bake at 180 C / Gas 4 for 45 minutes. Remove from oven, and let cool before slicing.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(100)

Reviews in English (79)

Definitely not my cup of tea. The bread had a really strange almost minty taste to it? Won't be making again!-09 Sep 2014

by Aven

I really love pumpernickel bread and this one is delightful. I followed the recipe but made it in the kitchen aid and baked it in the oven. It turned out moist and delicious! I am so happy to have found this recipe thank you. I will make it many more times....-21 Oct 2006

by Andrew

Mixed and kneeded in the Kitchen Aide with a dough hook for 10 minutes. Texture came out great. Not a large second rise in the bread pan, but the finished texture was right for a heavier bread and the taste was great. I am going to try adding gluten next time to see if the rise is better.-02 Jun 2004


How To make German Pumpernickel Bread

Pumpernickel is a typically heavy, slightly sweet rye bread traditionally made with sourdough starter and coarsely ground rye.It's origins are in the region of Westphalia, first referred to in print in 1450.

A false folk etymology involves Napoleon, who, while invading Germany, asked for bread and was served dark Westphalian rye. According to the folktale, Napoleon declared that this was not suitable bread for himself, the emperor, but was bread (pain) for Nickel, his horse: C'est du pain pour Nickel!

(Read from: German Wikipedia, as of 8 December 2016)

Bonnie’s Best Creations/ Baking/ Pumpernickel Bread

I am baking my favourite bread of all time!
Yes! Pumpernickel Bread
Welcome & I sure hope you give this wholesome bread a try.
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1 cup strong coffee
1/2 cup molasses
2 tablespoons margerine
1tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1cup whole wheat flour
2 Cups rye flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

German Pumpernickel Recipe in The Bread Kitchen

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German Seeded Rye Bread | Kornbeißer Brot

In this video, I show you how to bake a dense, seeded rye bread from Germany called Kornbeißer Brot. The ingredients used in the recipe are:

250 g Rye berries, coarsely ground
250 ml boiling water
40 g molasses
20 g fresh yeast (or 7g active dry yeast)
250 ml lukewarm water
20 g salt
125 g rye flour
250 g mixed seeds (sesame, flax, sunflower, and pumpkin)

To purchase a kitchen scale for metric measurements:

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100% Rye Bread with Sourdough - No wheat added! ✪ MyGerman.Recipes

A pure rye bread that has no wheat flour! Very rustic and delicious - a must try!


German Pumpernickel Bread

In largebowl, stir together yeast, cocoa, sugar, caraway seed, salt, and 2 cups rye flour set aside.

In 2 quart saucepan over low heat, heat water, molasses and butter until very warm.

Using mixer at low speed, gradually beat molasses mixture into yeast mixture until well blended.

Increase speed to medium beat 2 minutes.

Add remaining 1cup rye flour.

Increase speed to high beat 2 more minutes.

Stir in enough all-purpose flour to make a soft dough.

Turn out dough onto lightly floured surface.

Knead until smooth and elastic about 5 minutes.

Place into greased large bowl, turning over dough so that top is greased.

Cover with towel and let rise in warm place until almost doubled, about 45 minutes to an hour.

Cover and let rest 5 minutes.

Shape each half into a round loaf.

Place, 4 inches apart, on greased large baking sheet.

Cover and let rise until almost doubled, 45 minutes to an hour.

Diagonally slash each loaf, crosswise, 3 times.

Bake in 375℉ (190℃) F oven for 20 minutes.

Cover loosely with foil bake 15 minutes more or until loaves sound hollow when tapped.


German Bavarian Pumpernickel Bread

In a large bowl sprinkle the yeast over the warm water stir to dissolve. Add the Rye sour, cooked rye berries, pumpernickel color, pumpernickel flour and salt. Stir until dough comes away from sides of the bowl, adding rye flour 1/4 cup at a time if necessary. This dough will remain wet, with the consistency of heavy clay. Turn out onto an oiled work top.

Grease a Pullman pan or loaf pan. Knead the dough into a ball and form into a cylinder the length of the pan. Place the dough in the pan. The dough should be pressed down evenly and come within a 1/4 inch of the top. If you use a Pullman pan, grease the inside of the cover, slide in place, and bake. In lieu of a Pullman pan, place a loaf pan on a baking sheet, grease a second baking sheet, and invert it over the top of the bread. Place in the oven and lay a heavy ovenproof weight or a brick on top. Do not proof.

Bake in a preheated 375 F oven on the middle shelf for 45 to 55 minutes. After the first 35 minutes, carefully remove the cover, turn out the bread and finish baking with the bread inverted directly on an oven stone or on the baking sheet. The loaf is done when the bottom emits a hollow sound when tapped lightly with your fingertips. Let cool on a wire rack, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. The next day, slice the loaf paper thin.

Prepare 48 hours in advance

1/2 cup rye flour
1/8 teaspoon active dry yeast
1 cup warm water
1 tablespoon crushed caraway seeds (optional)
1 teaspoon minced onion

Combine all the ingredients in a large bowl and mix until smooth. The mixture should have a thin consistency. Cover and allow to stand in a warm spot until bubbly and fermented. It can be left up to 24 hours.

Prepare 24 hours in advance

1/2 cup water
1 1/4 cups rye flour
All of the Starter above
1/4 cup rye flour for sprinkling

In a large bowl combine the water, 1 1/4 cups of the flour, and the starter stir until smooth. The dough should pull slightly and may start to come away from the sides of the bowl. Wipe down the sides of the bowl with wet hands or a bowl scraper. Sprinkle 1/4 cup of flour over the entire surface of the sour. Let stand, covered with a cloth or plastic wrap until doubled in size and the floured top appears cracked with fissures spread widely apart. This may take 4 to 8 hours. Avoid letting the sour collapse.

1/2 cup warm water
1 cup rye flour
All of above sour

Add the water and 3/4 cup of the flour, mix until smooth. Sprinkle 1/4 cup flour over the entire surface of the sour. Allow to rise in a warm place for 4 to 8 hours.

1/2 cup water
1 cup rye flour or more
All of above sour

Add the water and the 1 cup of flour mix until smooth. Add additional flour as needed to attain a dough-like consistency. The sour, when fully risen in stage three (about 8 hours) is ready for use in the dough.

6 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons water
pinch of cream of tartar
1/2 cup boiling water

In a heavy sauce pan over low heat, melt the sugar with the 2 tablespoons water. Increase heat to medium high, cover the pan, bring to a boil, and boil for 2 minutes. Add the cream of tartar and continue to boil, uncovered, until the sugar is almost black in color. Remove the pan from the heat. The sugar will continue to cook and darken. Allow it to cool. Using extreme care, add the boiling water. Stir to dissolve, then let cool to room temperature.

To 3 cups boiling water add 1 cup chopped rye berries. Bring the water to a second boil, then cook, covered, over low heat until the cereal is tender (about 45 minutes).


German Pumpernickel Bread

In large bowl, stir together yeast, cocoa, sugar, caraway seed, salt, and 2 cups rye flour set aside.

In 2 quart saucepan over low heat, heat water, molasses and butter until very warm (120-130 ^F) Using mixer at low speed, gradually beat molasses mixture into yeast mixture until well blended.

Increase speed to medium beat 2 minutes.

Add remaining 1c rye flour. Increase speed to high beat 2 more minutes.

Stir in enough all-purpose flour to make a soft dough.

Turn out dough onto lightly floured surface.

Knead until smooth and elastic about 5 minutes.

Place into greased large bowl, turning over dough so that top is greased.

Cover with towel and let rise in warm place until almost doubled, about 45 minutes to an hour.

Divide in half. cover and let rest 5 minutes.

Shape each half into a round loaf.

Place, 4 inches apart, on greased large baking sheet.

Cover and let rise until almost doubled, 45 minutes to an hour.

Diagonally slash each loaf, crosswise, 3 times.

Bake in 375^ oven for 20 minutes.

Cover loosely with foil bake 15 minutes more or until loaves sound hollow when tapped.


Raisin-walnut pumpernickel bread

I’m eating a massive slice of this bread right now (as toast, duh) and it is glorious.

I never used to be a morning person. But I was never really a night person, either. And I actually hate that afternoon hour between 4 and 5 p.m. (it just always drags on and on and there’s not even anything good on TV to make it go by faster, you know?). Really, I’m a mid-morning person. The hours between 9 a.m. and noon are my peak hours. I’m like a machine. I get all the things done during this time. I’m super productive. I’d like to thank the toast for this bout of energy.

But then lunchtime rolls around and all I can think about is food, and then once I eat said food all I can think about is taking a nap, and sometimes this may or may not be possible (I’ve tried in all too many inappropriate/inconvenient locations including my car, the back of a classroom, a folding chair, the kitchen table, a hardwood floor, etc. etc.). If I do end up taking a nap, all hope of more productivity is lost because I probably slept too long. Hard knock life, y’all.

ANYWAY, all this to say, in my increasing age I’ve become more of a morning person. I don’t know what’s wrong with me. I love being the first one awake in my household (well, besides my cat who has already tried no less than three times to wake me up by incessantly sniffing my face, weirdo), turning on the coffeemaker, checking my e-mails and the Twitter while the coffeemaker makes all its rumbles and pops and trickles, pouring and then guzzling said coffee while watching the sun come up. And of course, the promise of toast. Especially when homemade pumpernickel bread is involved.

Pumpernickel bread is special to me for many reasons. One, it reminds me of growing up in a German family — that is to say, my grandparents came straight from the Motherland and brought with them their love of traditional foods, one of which is pumpernickel. One and a half (because it’s slightly related), it’s my mom’s go-to choice for her daily breakfast toast (fruit doesn’t fall far, obvs) and it was my grandfather’s favorite bread, too. And two, it’s incredibly easy to make and produces delicious — you guessed it — toast (and deli sandwiches and grilled cheese and savory bread pudding and and and…).

This particular recipe won over my heart because it not only incorporates toasted walnuts and raisins into the batter for added texture and flavor, it also only requires one rise and that rise takes, oh, a half-hour. This is a MAJOR WIN, people. Bread bakers and non-bread bakers (and lazy people like me!) alike can appreciate this shortcut.

Oh, and as a minor segue, I made a video to show you the difference between instant and active dry yeast (either of which can be used in this recipe — double win!) (P.S. apologies for the horrible lighting/resolution in the video… working on/wishing for technological upgrades):

So basically what you should take away from all this rambling is the following: I’m a morning person now and it’s weird I’m still a diehard toast fanatic there is a difference between instant and active dry yeast go forth and make pumpernickel bread.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ¾ cups warm water (100° to 110°)
  • 1 (1/4-ounce) packet highly active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons instant coffee granules
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • 4 ½ cups bread flour
  • 1 cup rye flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted

Preheat oven to 200°. Stir together first 3 ingredients in the mixing bowl of a heavy-duty electric stand mixer. Let stand 5 minutes.

Add coffee and next 4 ingredients to yeast mixture. Beat at low speed with dough hook attachment for 1 minute or until soft dough comes together. Beat at medium speed 4 minutes. (Dough will be slightly sticky.)

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface shape dough into a 9- x 5-inch oval loaf. Place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet coat lightly with cooking spray, and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Turn oven off, and place loaf in oven. Let rise 30 minutes or until loaf is doubled in bulk. Remove loaf from oven. Remove and discard plastic wrap. Preheat oven to 375°.

Bake bread for 30 to 35 minutes. Remove from oven, and brush with melted butter. Cool on wire rack.

German-Style Pumpernickel Rolls: Pat dough into a 10-inch square (1/2 inch thick). Cut into 2-inch squares. Roll into 1 1/2-inch balls, and place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Proceed with recipe as directed. Bake at 375° for 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. (Makes 25 Rolls).

German-Style Pumpernickel Rolls with Caraway: Follow instructions for German-Style Pumpernickel Rolls, adding 1 tablespoon caraway seeds. Proceed with recipe as directed.

Walnut-Raisin Pumpernickel Boule: Add 3/4 cup raisins (or golden raisins) and 1 cup coarsely chopped toasted walnuts to dough before mixing. Shape dough into a ball, and gently flatten to a 7-inch circle. Cut 3 slits in dough (1/4 to 1/2 inch deep) with a sharp paring knife just before baking, if desired. Whisk together 1 egg white and 3 tablespoons water in a small bowl brush loaf with egg mixture. Bake at 375° for 38 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Omit brushing on melted butter. (Makes 1 Loaf).

Sour-Rye Pumpernickel Bread: The Sour Starter gives this bold bread a subtle tangy flavor. Reduce water to 1 cup. Add 2 tablespoons browning and seasoning sauce and 1 cup Sour Starter to dough mix with dough hook attachment at medium-high speed with heavy duty stand mixter 5 minutes. Proceed with recipe as directed.


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Pumpernickel – German Rye Bread

Pumpernickel is a typically heavy, slightly sweet rye bread traditionally made with sourdough starter and coarsely ground rye. It is often made today with a combination of rye flour and whole rye berries. Pumpernickel has been long associated with the Westphalia region of Germany, first referred to in print in 1450. Although it is not known whether this and other early references refer to precisely the bread that came to be known as Pumpernickel, Westphalian pumpernickel is distinguished by use of coarse rye meal and a very long baking period, which gives the bread its characteristic dark color. Like most traditional all-rye breads, pumpernickel is traditionally made with an acidic sourdough starter. Pumpernickel has a rich dark-brown color, but no crust as it’s baked in fully covered baking tins.

Making Pumpernickel the proper way takes some effort and time, so be prepared for the delayed gratification effect!


Vollkornbrot – German Wholegrain Bread

Experience the flavor and texture of Vollkornbrot like fresh from the German bakery! Dense, chewy, packed with nutrition and full of flavor, this German Vollkornbrot is wonderful with your choice of butter, jam, Nutella, cheese, or cold cuts. It features a grain called Einkorn that is used throughout much of western Europe, though you can substitute other grains as noted in the recipe.

Ingredients:

4 1/2 cups einkorn flour you can also use whole wheat, spelt, rye or combination
1/2 cup whole einkorn berries or wheat, spelt or rye berries
1 3/4 cups cracked einkorn berries or wheat, spelt, rye
1 cup whole flax seeds
1 1/2 cups sunflower seeds
1/4 cup sesame seeds
3 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons dry active yeast
2 tablespoons sugar optional
2 cups lukewarm water
2 cups buttermilk at room temperature
1 cup mild beer at room temperature (can substitute water or buttermilk)
Rolled oats for sprinkling


Watch the video: Pumpernickel - Schwarzbrot Rezept das mehrere Wochen frisch bleibt (October 2021).