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Country-Style Ponzu

Country-Style Ponzu

Ponzu is one sauce I see completely bastardized all over the Internet and in Japanese cookbooks. Farmers also like a strong salty flavor, since they work hard in the fields before sitting down to dinner.

See all sauce recipes.

Click here to see the Gyu Tataki Recipe.

Notes

*Note: The ratio of soy sauce to citrus juice should be 1:1.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 Cup daidai (bitter orange) juice, yuzu juice, or a mixture of equal parts lemon and tangerine juice
  • Chopped chives (optional)

Ponzu Green Stir Fry


My go to easy recipe for dinner has to be a stir-fry. I always have some veggies in the fridge broccoli and carrots are must haves in my house. There is always a piece of ginger root hiding behind something and of course some garlic. Rice and a few bottles of condiments are always on hand as well in my pantry. So when I haven’t put any thought into what we are having for dinner, stir-fry it is! It is a healthy delicious meal. Almost always vegan & vegetarian, full of fiber and plant proteins. This time around I had some Marukan Ponzu Premium Soy Dressing with Sudachi Citrus in my pantry and decided to make a Ponzu Green Stir Fry.

Delicious Rating: I am in love with this Ponzu Dressing! It is an absolute must in your pantry and there are plenty of recipes on the Marukan site to cook up using the dressing. I balanced out the citrus with some ginger and honey. It was a nice change up to my Tofu Stir-Fry recipe adding another layer of flavor to the sauce. I only used green veggies and they were great but next time I think I will add a red bell pepper and some carrots for some color on that plate! FOR RECIPE & PHOTO GUIDE CLICK → →


Preparation

  • In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, lime juice, sugar, and fish sauce stir until the sugar dissolves. In another small bowl, stir the garlic, 1-1/2 tsp. of the oil, and 1-1/2 tsp. pepper.

Season the beef with salt and pepper. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet, heat 1-1/2 tsp.of the oil over medium-high heat until shimmering hot. Swirl to coat the skillet. Add half of the beef in a single layer and cook, without stirring, until well browned, 1 to 2 minutes. Using tongs, turn the pieces over and brown on the other side, 1 to 2 minutes more. Transfer to a medium bowl. Add 1-1/2 tsp. oil to the skillet and repeat with the remaining beef, adding it to the bowl with the first batch when done.

Recipe Notes

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Ingredient Spotlight


Ingredients

  • 3 pounds center cut, trimmed whole piece of dry aged beef sirloin (the primal muscle that NY strip steaks come from), be careful to ask the butcher NOT to cut from the nerve end of the sirloin (a tough place for such a tender dish)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon white sesame seeds
  • 3 tablespoon peanut oil
  • 1 tablespoon hot chile sesame oil (or more to taste)
  • 6 scallions

Ponzu

  • 4 tablespoons aged soy sauce (this is the best soy sauce around)
  • 8 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 inch square piece of kombu
  • 2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

Instructions

First, Make the Ponzu

Combine the soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, lemon juice, kombu and ginger in a mixing bowl. Place in the fridge overnight. Strain before serving.

Prepare the Tataki

Cut the large piece of meat in half, lengthwise. Allow to come to room temperature, about 1 hour.

Season the beef on all sides with salt, pepper, sesame oil and a sprinkle of white sesame seeds.

Preheat a cast iron skillet over high heat for a few minutes. Add the peanut oil. Sear the beef over high heat, making sure to keep the center rare, about 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Let meat rest for 10 minutes, slice thin and arrange on a large platter.

Slice the scallions paper thin, sprinkle on the beef along with the hot chile sesame oil.


  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar (1 ounce 30ml)
  • 1/2 cup mirin (4 ounces 120ml) (see note)
  • 1 (3- by 3-inch) piece kombu (about 1 ounce 30g) (see note)
  • 1/2 ounce (15g) shaved katsuobushi (see note)
  • 1/2 cup yuzu juice, or equal parts lemon and lime juice (4 ounces 120ml) (see note)
  • 1/2 cup light soy sauce (4 ounces 120ml)

Combine vinegar, mirin, and kombu in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and stir in katsuobushi. Cover and let steep for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer and discard solids (or reserve to make a second batch, using some additional katsuobushi in the second batch). Allow liquid to cool completely.

Combine steeped mirin, citrus juice, and soy sauce. Ponzu will keep in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


Method

  1. Begin by pouring the oyster sauce and soy sauce into a Ziploc bag and placing the backstrap in the marinade. Refrigerate for 4-6 hours. Make sure to remove the backstrap from the marinade and allow it to come to room temperature, about an hour, before you begin cooking the meat.
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine all of the ponzu ingredients except the green onion. Stir and let the flavors meld together for an hour or more.
  3. In a large cast iron or sauté pan, heat the vegetable oil until it begins to smoke. Lightly season the meat with salt and sear on all sides until caramelized. Add the butter once you flip the backstrap. This will add flavor and fat to the meat. All you’re doing here is searing the meat to a nice rare. For the less adventurous, this preparation will work with medium-rare, too.
  4. Set the meat aside and let it cool to room temperature. Once the meat has cooled, slice it very thinly and set the pieces on a large serving platter or individual plates.
  5. Stir the ponzu again and pour enough over the meat to just barely cover it. Be aware, the citrus in the ponzu will continue “cold cooking” the meat (think ceviche). The longer it sits, the more it will cook through. I find the sweet spot is about 20 minutes. When you’re ready to serve, finish with the green onions and you have an appetizer that’s sure to turn heads.

Bring home the entire Mega Spice Collection and change the way you cook.

"This is good for your old man, cause he'll be eating better. And it's good for you, cause you'll be eating better when you're with your old man. So it's a win-win, which is what gift giving is all about!" - Steven Rinella


Chicken & Vegetable Stir-Fry

In this quick-cooking dish, sautéed chicken and crisp vegetables get a bright lift from citrusy ponzu sauce added to our rich sauce alongside sweet hoisin and savory black bean sauce. A simple bed of jasmine rice provides the perfect contrast to the bold flavors.

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title

In a medium pot, combine the rice, a big pinch of salt, and 2 cups of water. Heat to boiling on high. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low. Cover and cook, without stirring, 12 to 14 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender. Turn off the heat and fluff with a fork.

While the rice cooks, wash and dry the fresh produce. Peel the carrots halve lengthwise, then thinly slice crosswise. Cut off and discard the root end of the bok choy thinly slice crosswise. In a bowl, whisk together the black bean sauce, ponzu sauce, hoisin sauce, and sautéed aromatics.

While the rice continues to cook, pat the chicken dry with paper towels. Place in a bowl add the cornstarch. Season with salt and pepper toss to coat. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned chicken and sliced carrots in an even layer. Cook, without stirring, 3 to 4 minutes, or until lightly browned. Stir to combine.

To the pan, add the sliced bok choy and sauce (carefully, as the liquid may splatter). Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 4 to 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are softened and the chicken is cooked through. Turn off the heat. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Serve the finished chicken and vegetables over the cooked rice. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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In a medium pot, combine the rice, a big pinch of salt, and 2 cups of water. Heat to boiling on high. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low. Cover and cook, without stirring, 12 to 14 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender. Turn off the heat and fluff with a fork.

While the rice cooks, wash and dry the fresh produce. Peel the carrots halve lengthwise, then thinly slice crosswise. Cut off and discard the root end of the bok choy thinly slice crosswise. In a bowl, whisk together the black bean sauce, ponzu sauce, hoisin sauce, and sautéed aromatics.

While the rice continues to cook, pat the chicken dry with paper towels. Place in a bowl add the cornstarch. Season with salt and pepper toss to coat. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned chicken and sliced carrots in an even layer. Cook, without stirring, 3 to 4 minutes, or until lightly browned. Stir to combine.

To the pan, add the sliced bok choy and sauce (carefully, as the liquid may splatter). Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 4 to 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are softened and the chicken is cooked through. Turn off the heat. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Serve the finished chicken and vegetables over the cooked rice. Enjoy!


This Garlic Shrimp & Vegetable Stir Fry is Healthy Dinner in Minutes

It might be called “garlic shrimp,” but I think the real star of this show is citrus-y ponzu sauce. Together with the brown sugar and rice vinegar it makes a teriyaki style sauce that’s a little less sweet, brighter, and has more complex flavors. Ponzu sauce is sold in most grocery stores, in the Asian section, but it can also be ordered online.

Stir-fries are also a great way to get kids involved in the kitchen. Younger kids can pick the vegetables and make the sauce. Older kids can also help prep the vegetables, peel and devein the shrimp, and prepare the rice. Teens who are proficient with the stove can even learn to make this meal on their own! It’s an easy dish to learn since shrimp are quick and easy to cook.

This Garlic Shrimp & Vegetable Stir Fry recipe with photo was shared with us by Mizkan America, makers of Japanese sauces and rice vinegars.


How to make homemade Ponzu Sauce

To make 1 cup of Ponzu, whisk together:

  • 1/2 cup low sodium soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice and/or orange juice (I like a combo &ndash half and half)
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons mirin (Japanese sweet cooking wine) &ndash or substitute with 2 tablespoons sake or water + 2 teaspoons sugar)

Give it a taste. Is it tangy, but still slightly sweet? Feel free to add more sugar. If it&rsquos too salty, add more water.


Seared scallops with ponzu, ginger and chives

There had been flirtation. Rounds of spiky conversation. But the direction of this dalliance was still hovering in the air.

Then we met for rendezvous No. 3.

The evening started out promisingly: a biblical storm unleashed outside, a table in front of a lively fire, a nice bottle of Petite Sirah to arrive presently.

And then I eyed his potatoes.

In response, my companion’s eyes fell to his fresh white shirt. Then, his lap. “What?” His gaze finally settled on his plate -- a compliments-of-the-chef starter that the waiter had just placed before him. He focused back on me, eyebrows raised, perplexed: “What?”

I didn’t answer immediately. Not to be coy. I was taking it all in. The potatoes -- golden, crispy wedges -- were studded with thick chunks of apple-wood-smoked bacon. All of it glistening with butter. But that’s not what had gotten my attention.

“The chives, " I said. There they were, their slender, bright, deep green stalks strewn about, playing peekaboo. Flirting more overtly than my companion.

“Oh. You like chives?” he said as if I’d finally given him the key to something. A smile bloomed and then something different -- something new -- flickered in his eyes: “I should find out if they have more in the kitchen. Put them on everything you order. ”

I matched his gaze, surprised somewhat by my own candor, this different spark. And now, as we eyed the chives, even if they served as a convenient stand-in, they were a clue, an indicator, of an open door. I knew that finally everything was on the table.

I couldn’t go as far to say that chives have the magic of an aphrodisiac -- my personal oyster, aniseed or taste of semisweet dark chocolate. But in all their inscrutable delicateness, chives summon up something strong inside me.

Not as brazen as garlic or onions, chives are sometimes taken for granted. I think this every time I see them toted out in some version of a stainless steel gravy boat by a sullen server and heaped upon a baked potato, by rote, as if to resuscitate.

But it was under similar circumstances that I first connected with chives as a child. A glum waiter plopped them down in a ramekin, reporting that the kitchen had run out of sour cream. I accepted my potato with a pat of butter and salt and liberally sprinkled the lot with chives: The flavor that burst through -- subtle, sharp and warm -- was as complex as it was restrained.

There are very few things I keep in my refrigerator on a regular basis. Certainly, very few things that will perish quickly.

My day always spools out into the late evening. My meals are often caught on the fly -- with friends at restaurants, hunted and gathered from after-party tables.

On any given day, a peek inside my fridge would reveal little more than some domestic bottled water, imported condiments (Thai chili sauce, tarragon mustard), coffee beans and a carton of eggs. Perhaps some cheese -- feta or manchego.

But no matter how top-to-bottom a week I think I’m going to have, how seldom I figure I’ll have the time or energy to stand in front of the stove, I always make sure I have fresh chives stowed away just in case. Just in case a dreamy night of live music calls for a late-night omelet with goat cheese and chives to prolong the conversation.

Just in case friends arrive and I can slide a salmon filet on the grill or toss a few scallops into the skillet and just add ginger, ponzu and a shower of fresh chives. On nesting days, I might snip chives over simple soups -- hot or cold -- to suss out another layer: a simple chicken broth with lemon and chives a childhood tomato soup with a dollop of creme fraiche and chives. As a thank-you for a couch to crash on last August, a friend whipped up a chilled summer melon gazpacho punctuated with that inscrutable, singular note.

I go through cilantro and sweet basil benders, but I always circle back. There might be fancier, flashier, trendier aromatics -- herbes de Provence, fennel, lemon verbena, arugula or lavender -- but the beauty of chives is that they simply don’t need to be the center of attention. And they are certainly not flavor of the month. They work best to support other flavors, to bolster, and, with a few snips, make the mundane marvelous.

Chive oil is handy for that too. Just simmer chopped chives in canola oil, puree, strain and you’ll have a bottle on hand of liquid chives to give a quick slash of color and intense flavor to mashed potatoes or steamed fish or grilled chicken breast.

To reveal what magic those chives worked (or didn’t) that rainy evening would be indelicate -- decidedly un-chive like. But the plates arrived, the middle courses, main courses. And mysteriously, even without my shy companion’s assist, the chives also continued to arrive, dropped like confetti over scallops, tying up puff pastry stuffed with wild mushrooms and chestnuts so the dish looked like an early Christmas gift.

I took it as a gentle sign of promise. Like the rain, the fire and the music that night the chives didn’t obstruct or overpower what they had been brought in to adorn. They just emboldened what was already there.