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Roach-Eating Contest Winner Dies

Roach-Eating Contest Winner Dies

He collapsed after eating dozens of live roaches and worms

A 32-year-old man collapsed after competing in a live-insect eating contest in South Florida, where 30 contestants all tried to down as many insects and worms as possible on Friday night at a reptile store to win an $800 python.

The winner, Edward Archbold, became ill after eating "dozens of live bugs and worms," collapsing in front of the store. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead, a sherriff's statement said. Authorities are awaiting results of an autopsy to determine the cause of death.

"Unless the roaches were contaminated with some bacteria or other pathogens, I don't think that cockroaches would be unsafe to eat," said Michael Adams, professor of entomology at the University of California at Riverside, told the AP. "Some people do have allergies to roaches," he said, "but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects."

The bugs used in the competition were "safely and domestically raised" as food for reptiles, AP reports.


The Dark Truth Of Food Eating Contests

Love them or hate them, there's a good chance you feel pretty strongly about competitive eating contests. They're taken extremely seriously by those who compete professionally, and thanks to shows like Man v. Food, the ordinary person can get involved in some serious gluttony for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert.

Strangely, food eating contests are nothing new. According to Time, one of the earliest mentions goes back to Norse mythology, where Loki faced off against one of his servants in an eating contest. The servant won, only by eating the plate — and no one ever suggests you should follow in the footsteps of any Norse myth.

Officially, though, it's Nathan's Famous who's credited for really starting the whole thing in 1916, when they hosted four immigrants who wanted to prove who was the most patriotic by eating the most hot dogs. The winner was an Irishman, who scarfed down a now-modest 13 hot dogs. (Compare that to Joey Chestnut's recent 71-dog win.) There have been so many other stunts, too: there's even records in the Guinness Book of World Records for eating, because of course there are.

But there's a dark side to these eating contests, and it gets even more disturbing than you might be expecting.


Winner of Florida roach-eating contest collapses, dies after eating dozens of the live bugs

MIAMI—The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday.

About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night's contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 40 miles (64 kilometres) north of Miami. The grand prize was a python.

Edward Archbold, 32, became ill shortly after the contest ended and collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff's Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were waiting for results of an autopsy to determine a cause of death.

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff's office said.

There was no updated phone number listed for Archbold in West Palm Beach.

"We feel terribly awful," said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. "He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice," Siegel said, adding that Archbold was "the life of the party."

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

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A statement from Siegel's attorney said all the participants signed waivers "accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest."

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects "that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles."


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MIAMI -- The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday.

About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night's contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 40 miles (64 kilometres) north of Miami. The grand prize was a python.

Edward Archbold, 32, became ill shortly after the contest ended and collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff's Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were waiting for results of an autopsy to determine a cause of death.

"Unless the roaches were contaminated with some bacteria or other pathogens, I don't think that cockroaches would be unsafe to eat," said Michael Adams, professor of entomology at the University of California at Riverside, who added that he has never heard of someone dying after consuming roaches. "Some people do have allergies to roaches," he said, "but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects."

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff's office said.

"We feel terribly awful," said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. "He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice," Siegel said, adding that Archbold was "the life of the party."

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

A statement from Siegel's attorney said all the participants signed waivers "accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest."

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects "that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles."


Winner of roach-eating contest dies after eating bugs prize to go to his estate

MIAMI—The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday.

About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night’s contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 60 kilometres north of Miami. The grand prize was a python.

Edward Archbold, 32, of West Palm Beach became ill shortly after the contest ended and collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff’s Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were waiting for results of an autopsy to determine a cause of death.

“Unless the roaches were contaminated with some bacteria or other pathogens, I don’t think that cockroaches would be unsafe to eat,” said Michael Adams, professor of entomology at the University of California at Riverside, who added that he has never heard of someone dying after consuming roaches. “Some people do have allergies to roaches,” he said, “but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects.”

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff’s office said.

There was no updated phone number listed for Archbold in West Palm Beach.

“We feel terribly awful,” said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. “He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice,” Siegel said, adding that Archbold was “the life of the party.”

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

The Miami Herald reported the grand prize has been put aside in Archbold’s name and will be given to his estate.

Loading.

A statement from Siegel’s attorney said all the participants signed waivers “accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest.”

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects “that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles.”


U.S. roach-eating contest winner collapses, dies

The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday.

About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night's contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 60 kilometres north of Miami. The grand prize was a python.

Edward Archbold, 32, of West Palm Beach became ill shortly after the contest ended and collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff's Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were waiting for results of an autopsy to determine a cause of death.

"Unless the roaches were contaminated with some bacteria or other pathogens, I don't think that cockroaches would be unsafe to eat," said Michael Adams, professor of entomology at the University of California at Riverside, who added that he has never heard of someone dying after consuming roaches. "Some people do have allergies to roaches," he said, "but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects."

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff's office said.

There was no updated phone number listed for Archbold in West Palm Beach.

"We feel terribly awful," said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. "He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice," Siegel said, adding that Archbold was "the life of the party."

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

The Miami Herald reported the grand prize has been put aside in Archbold's name and will be given to his estate.

A statement from Siegel's attorney said all the participants signed waivers "accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest."

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects "that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles."


Winner of Florida roach-eating contest collapses, dies after downing dozens of the live bugs

MIAMI - The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday.

About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night's contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 40 miles (60 kilometres) north of Miami. The grand prize was a python.

Edward Archbold, 32, of West Palm Beach became ill shortly after the contest ended and collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff's Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were waiting for results of an autopsy to determine a cause of death.

"Unless the roaches were contaminated with some bacteria or other pathogens, I don't think that cockroaches would be unsafe to eat," said Michael Adams, professor of entomology at the University of California at Riverside, who added that he has never heard of someone dying after consuming roaches. "Some people do have allergies to roaches," he said, "but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects."

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff's office said.

There was no updated phone number listed for Archbold in West Palm Beach.

"We feel terribly awful," said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. "He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice," Siegel said, adding that Archbold was "the life of the party."

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

The Miami Herald reported the grand prize has been put aside in Archbold's name and will be given to his estate.

A statement from Siegel's attorney said all the participants signed waivers "accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest."

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects "that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles."


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“Some people do have allergies to roaches,” he said, “but there are no toxins in roaches or related insects.”

None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff’s office said.

There was no updated phone number listed for Archbold in West Palm Beach.

“We feel terribly awful,” said store owner Ben Siegel, who added that Archbold did not appear to be sick before the contest. “He looked like he just wanted to show off and was very nice,” Siegel said, adding that Archbold was “the life of the party.”

Siegel said Archbold was selling the exotic prize to a friend who took him to the contest.

The Miami Herald reported the grand prize has been put aside in Archbold’s name and will be given to his estate.

A statement from Siegel’s attorney said all the participants signed waivers “accepting responsibility for their participation in this unique and unorthodox contest.”

The bugs consumed were from an inventory of insects “that are safely and domestically raised in a controlled environment as food for reptiles.”


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Top 5 dishes in recipe contest to be served at Tokyo Olympic village

The Tokyo Olympic organizing committee on Monday announced five special dishes to be served at the athletes' village during this summer's games, following a recipe contest last year.

The winners include cold "somen" noodles, a classic dish eaten in Japan's hot summer months. While it is common to soak noodles in light soup stock with condiments, the noodles will be served with chicken and vegetables in a tomato broth to help athletes get the nutrition they need.

"Oden," a standard winter menu item, will be also served. However, the dish, normally eaten as a hot pot, will be served in a chilled soup with tomatoes and other summer vegetables along with more typical ingredients such as processed fishcakes.

For dessert "zunda de panna cotta," with sweetened mashed green soybeans used in northeastern Japan, will be on offer.

The two other dishes are "zangi" deep-fried salmon, originating in the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, and toasted bread with peaches, ham and cream cheese.

The contest, held by the organizing committee and corporate sponsors between August and September last year, received more than 700 recipes.


Watch the video: Man dies after live roach-eating contest in Fla. (October 2021).