New recipes

Edible mini gifts recipe

Edible mini gifts recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Fruit
  • Exotic fruit
  • Dates

These 'gifts' make a lovely edible decoration for Christmas. They are also vegan and gluten free.

2 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 12 pieces

  • 70g whole unpeeled almonds
  • 70g cashews
  • 12 stoned dates
  • 70g dried cranberries
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 175g dessicated coconut
  • For the decoration
  • icing sugar
  • lemon juice
  • red food colouring
  • snowflakes or other sugar decorations

MethodPrep:45min ›Extra time:30min freezing › Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Toast almonds and cashews in a dry frying pan. Set aside to cool.
  2. Coarsely chop almonds and cashews in a food processor. Add dates and coconut oil; pulse again to combine ingredients but be careful not to turn it into a paste.
  3. Transfer to a bowl and add the dessicated coconut. Mix well.
  4. Line a rectangular baking dish with greaseproof paper and tip the mixture into it. Flatten with a spatula and place in the freezer till hardened, about 30 minutes.
  5. Unmould and cut into squares.
  6. Mix icing sugar with just enough lemon juice to make a very thick icing. Add a few drops of food colouring and stir well. Place into a piping bag with a fine nozzle and pipe a 'ribbon' onto each square. Add snowflakes or other sugar decorations if desired. Set aside until the icing is completely hardened.
  7. Put on small plates on the table or napkins for a festive Christmas table decoration.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)


Easy Ways to Beautifully Package Your Edible Gifts

I’m pretty sure my love languages are food and gifts. There’s something wonderful about putting time and effort into making a delightful treat and then giving it to someone you care about.

For years, I have made dozens and dozens of cake pops, cookies, bread, and all sorts of other goodies for my neighbors, colleagues, and friends. I love to see their reactions!

If you’d like to give an edible gift, there are two parts to consider:

It can be slightly intimidating to know how to package food, but it’s not hard. Here’s what you need to know!


Homemade Edible Christmas Gifts: 15 Must Have Recipes

Christmas is coming . but that doesn't necessarily mean a last minute dash to the shops for last-minute gift purchases. Not when you can have fun getting covered in flour at home conjuring up some homemade edible Christmas gifts instead.

Why not try baking, shaping and wrapping your own homemade edible Christmas gifts in the comfort of your own home, instead. After all, food is always a welcome gift, especially when it's made by your fair own hands . even if you aren't the best cook in the world . it's the thought that counts!

Here's a selection of recipes that'll cook you into the good books of loved ones, from mini panettone to wild mushroom terrine. Be sure to package your food parcels beautifully with our holiday packaging ideas.


5 Edible Gifts Kids Can Make

KIDS CAN MAKE: CHEESE STRAWS Food Network Kitchen Food Network Frozen Puff Pastry, Flour, Egg, Asiago Cheese KIDS CAN MAKE: FRUITANDNUT CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES Food Network Kitchen Food Network Pecans, Semisweet Chocolate, Vanilla Extract, Orange Zest, Kosher Salt, Heavy Cream, Unsalted Butter, Dried Apricots, Dried Prunes, Coarse Sanding Sugar KIDS CAN MAKE: PIZZA POPCORN Food Network Kitchen Food Network Cooking Spray, Tomato Paste, Parmesan, Oregano, Garlic Salt, Crushed Red Pepper Flakes, Popcorn KIDS CAN MAKE: PRETZEL AND POTATOCHIP BLONDIES Food Network Kitchen Food Network Unsalted Butter, Thin Pretzel Sticks, Flour, Baking Powder, Kosher Salt, Light Brown Sugar, Eggs, Vanilla Extract, Butterscotch Chips, Mini Semisweet Chocolate Chips, Potato Chips KIDS CAN MAKE: ROSEMARY BREAD IN A FLOWER POT Food Network Kitchen Food Network Olive Oil, Onion, Sugar, Active Dry Yeast, Flour, Rosemary, Kosher Salt, Cooking Spray, Unsalted Butter

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The holiday season is upon us, and that means two things: plenty of celebratory eating and lots of gift giving (and receiving)! Why not combine the two with edible gifts? The experts in Food Network Kitchen came up with these five adorable edible gifts that are simple enough for kids to make themselves, with just a little supervision. Delegate appropriate tasks to the big kids and little kids, and get creative with the wrapping and decorations. When the kids proudly present their homemade treats to teachers, friends and relatives, they’ll learn that holiday gift giving is even more fun when you’ve made the gifts yourself.

KIDS CAN MAKE: ROSEMARY BREAD IN A FLOWER POT Food Network Kitchen Food Network Olive Oil, Onion, Sugar, Active Dry Yeast, Flour, Rosemary, Kosher Salt, Cooking Spray, Unsalted Butter

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Rosemary bread baked in a clay flowerpot makes a charming gift — especially when you include herb seeds in the package for planting after the bread is gone. For little and big kids: Let them bloom the yeast, measure the flour and add it to the mixture, knead the dough, watch it rise, punch it down and shape it into balls. To wrap it up: Push a garden tag (or thank-you card) into the bread, and wrap the pot with a packet of rosemary seeds.

KIDS CAN MAKE: PRETZEL AND POTATOCHIP BLONDIES Food Network Kitchen Food Network Unsalted Butter, Thin Pretzel Sticks, Flour, Baking Powder, Kosher Salt, Light Brown Sugar, Eggs, Vanilla Extract, Butterscotch Chips, Mini Semisweet Chocolate Chips, Potato Chips

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

How do you make blondies even better? Add two favorite salty snacks to the sweet mix. For little kids: Let them measure ingredients and add toppings. For big kids: Let them pulse the food processor and spread the batter. To wrap them up: Place 4 blondies in a wide-mouth Mason jar, with cupcake liners separating them.

KIDS CAN MAKE: PIZZA POPCORN Food Network Kitchen Food Network Cooking Spray, Tomato Paste, Parmesan, Oregano, Garlic Salt, Crushed Red Pepper Flakes, Popcorn

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Turn cheese shakers into cute DIY pizza popcorn kits. For little kids: Let them measure, tear up the baked tomato paste and fill the sachet and shaker. For big kids: Let them do all of the above, plus operate the spice grinder. To wrap it up: Fill a sachet with 2 heaping tablespoons of the pizza spice, then tuck it into a 6-ounce cheese shaker with 1/2 cup popcorn kernels and the pizza spice sachet.

KIDS CAN MAKE: FRUITANDNUT CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES Food Network Kitchen Food Network Pecans, Semisweet Chocolate, Vanilla Extract, Orange Zest, Kosher Salt, Heavy Cream, Unsalted Butter, Dried Apricots, Dried Prunes, Coarse Sanding Sugar

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

These one-bite treats are extra rich and satisfying, thanks to the surprising addition of dried apricots and prunes. For little kids: Let them roll and decorate the truffles. For big kids: Let them measure, scoop, decorate and package them. To wrap them up: Roll 5 to 6 truffles in parchment, and twist the ends closed.

KIDS CAN MAKE: CHEESE STRAWS Food Network Kitchen Food Network Frozen Puff Pastry, Flour, Egg, Asiago Cheese

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

These easy, flaky cheese straws make a cute teacher gift. For little and big kids: Let everyone help dust the work surface, roll and twist the dough into sticks, brush them with egg wash, and sprinkle on the cheese. To wrap them up: Tuck the straws into a pencil case or a cup.

Get all 5 edible gift recipes and check out more holiday gift ideas from Food Network.


Whip up a holiday batch of nougat for an edible gift

Edible gifts are my favorite to give - and to get. Among those I like to make around the holidays, candies are at the very top of the list. Most have a longer shelf life than cookies, meaning a few hours spent now and those goodies will still be giftable at the end of the month, when your neighbor invites you for a glass of holiday cheer.

Of all the candies I make, nougat is unexpected and delicious. Like a chewy, dense marshmallow studded with fruit and nuts, and scented with honey, nougat is found in markets throughout Europe, Turkey, North Africa and the Middle East. It's sweet and crunchy and tart - and absolutely irresistible. Also, beautiful to look at. There are many ways to package nougat, requiring only a little creativity, and maybe some ribbon.

Nougat also serves another purpose. At the end of all the holiday baking, after a year of granola-making and recipe testing, my pantry is harboring a birds' nest of small packages - bits of dried cherries, a few apricots, a dried pear (yes, one). There are macadamias, hazelnuts and almonds, pistachios, pecans and walnuts. And nougat does not require a specific mix of fruits and nuts, but the opportunity to mix at will. Go ahead: KonMari the pantry and make a pan of nougat, essentially crossing two things off that excessively long to-do list.

Beyond the fruit and nuts, the recipe calls for only egg whites, sugar and honey. I omitted salt in the accompanying recipe, having included salted pistachios. If your pantry has whole raw nuts, toast them first. If they are unsalted, either salt them once toasted or add 1/2 teaspoon of kosher or sea salt to the recipe. The honey is the most forward of the flavors, so use that special jar from the farmers market or the one you brought back from vacation all those years ago.

There is one critical step: Do not overbeat the egg whites. If, once they've become lofty and have peaks, the whites begin to separate and liquid appears at the bottom of the bowl, you've gone too far. Sorry to say, but this is utterly irredeemable. Start again. It's only three eggs and not worth the gritty candy that results.

Timing it all - heating sugar syrup and honey to critical temperatures, and then getting the egg whites just so - should not cause anxiety. Be deliberate. Get everything set up, including the egg whites in the mixing bowl. Start by heating the sugar syrup, which will take the longest to reach temperature (about 20 minutes.) Once it's nearly there, start the heat under the honey. It should come to temperature in about 10 minutes. When either one reaches the goal temperature, remove the pan from the heat. Only when both sweeteners are at temperature is it time to start whipping the egg whites. When they are fluffy and have peaks that tip over when the beater is lifted, check the temperature of the syrups. They may have slightly reduced, and if so, reheat until they've regained the goal.

Pour the syrup and honey into the running mixer, one after the other, steadily and slowly. Initially, because of the tawny shade of the honey, the nougat will be beige, but as the mixer adds air it will change to snowy white - and will end up looking so appealing with red cranberries and green pistachios.

The last bit of advice I have for you: Making candy makes a terrible sticky mess, but it's easy to clean. Simply fill the pots with water, add any tools that will fit, and bring the water to a boil. Pour the boiling water over anything sticky still sitting in the sink. If candy is still stuck on, pour more boiling water over whatever hasn't come clean. It just takes time and a lot of hot water to get past it.

When the nougat has cooled and firmed up, portion it for gifting. There are many ways to present nougat. Wrap 2-by-5-inch slabs in parchment, tying it up with twine or a ribbon, or wrap 1-inch squares in individual candy wrappers. Any way you slice it, this is delicious gifting. Wishing you all a very happy season of joy.


Edible DIY Gifts: Double Cocoa Hot Chocolate Mix

This Double Cocoa Hot Chocolate Mix is a simple gift that is perfect for friends, coworkers, or family this holiday season. Customize it or leave it plain, and include the simple instructions for heating with milk.

I love gifting things to friends over the holiday season. It truly is a great time to be thankful for the people who are wonderful to you, and show them that love with a treat!

Over the next week, I will be featuring three easy DIYs that are not time consuming once you assemble the simple ingredients. While you can spice them up by adding extra components, the basic recipe is a delicious double cocoa hot chocolate mix that you can gift in small jars for the holidays.

If you’re looking to jazz up the basic recipe, here are some ideas…


Spread a sleeve of saltines on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Top with melted white chocolate and crushed candy canes. Sprinkle with a pinch of kosher salt or coarse sea salt. Let cool in refrigerator, then break into pieces and package in gift bags or small cookie tins.

These sand-art-style slow cooker meals in a jar are a great gift for those on your list who love to meal prep, or anyone who needs a quick and easy healthy meal every now and then (so, everyone, really!). To make, you simply layer all the ingredients in a jar and attach a recipe card with cooking directions.


What Do I Need To Make Weed Edibles?

Let’s start with Cannabis Hard Candies

The only ingredients you need to start making cannabis hard candies are sugar, water, corn syrup, and cannabis tincture.

The first thing you will need to decide on, is if you want to make THC hard candy or CBD hard candy.

Then it becomes as easy as taking candy from a baby!

Use a THC tincture if you are looking for THC edibles or a CBD tincture for CBD edibles.

You can also use both, it is all up to you!

Get creative because you can add in any flavor extract or coloring you want to customize your cannabis edibles.


DIY Candy Bar

Dessert bars and candy stations have become a popular part of weddings. Throwback to your childhood and let guests package up their favorite treats—using tongs and scoopers, of course—to enjoy on the way home from the reception.


Recipes: How to make edible and drinkable gifts such as baked goods or liqueur

In these challenging times, homemade goodies may be the best ticket when it comes to gift giving. Gifts created in a home kitchen seem to capture the spirit of the holidays in a way no store-bought treasure can. And for the gift giver, there can be comfort in the process.

Liqueur or Flavored Vinegar

Create a homemade liqueur or flavored vinegar and then sit back and enjoy the pleasure that those soul-warming potions can bring as gifts. Tie a bow on the bottle. Done.

Homemade liqueurs don’t take a lot of prep time. However, they do require advance planning and patience during the aging period. My favorite is limoncello, an Italian-inspired liqueur made from fresh lemons, liquor and simple sugar syrup. It has become extremely popular over the past several years and can be used in baked goods and as a cocktail ingredient. But it is most often served ice cold right from the freezer, poured into small glasses. Due to the required aging period, limoncello prep will need to start in the next couple of days to be ready for Christmas gift-giving.

Raspberry-flavored vinegar is another favorite. I use it in vinaigrettes, as well as sauces to accompany chicken, pork or game. It only requires one week of aging, so there is less of a time crunch in its prep.

Quick Bread or Loaf Cake

Or if baking is more your style, how about a loaf-shaped, unfrosted cake or quick bread? They are easy to gift wrap and can be made in advance (see do-ahead tips).

In my book, an apple cider doughnut is one of the best bets in the bakery box, both in flavor (apple and spices) and texture (the crunch, crunch of sugar-salt-cinnamon-nutmeg coating).

An Apple Cider Doughnut Loaf Cake captures those lovely traits.

The apple note comes from reducing apple cider to intensify the sweet-tart beauty it’s used in the batter, atop the cake just out of the oven (poured into puncture holes made with a toothpick), and again combined with melted butter and brushed on the cake’s exterior. That final flourish helps the sugar and cinnamon mixture adhere to the surface.

Banana bread dotted with semisweet chocolate chips is a snap to prepare. The addition of chocolate chips to a traditional banana bread creates a lovely surprise. The bread stays fresh for at least three days when wrapped airtight, making it a great candidate for gift giving.

My favorite way to gift wrap the loaves is to tie a piece of fabric around them. First wrap a loaf in plastic wrap, then in aluminum foil. Set it on a piece of thin fabric (such as organza, voile or handkerchief linen). The cloth needs to be large enough to tie in knots on top of the loaf when pulled from the sides, and then from the ends. Tie those knots and the job is done.

Happy holidays and stay safe.

Apple Cider Doughnut Loaf Cake

Apple Cider Doughnut Loaf Cake boasts delicious taste and texture and makes a wonderful gift. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Yield: 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

8 tablespoons plus 1 tablespoon butter, divided use, plus more for pan

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal salt or 1/2 teaspoon Morton kosher salt, plus a pinch more

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, divided use

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, divided use

2 large eggs, room temperature

1 cup granulated sugar, divided use

PROCEDURE

1. Place rack in middle of oven and preheat to 325 degrees. Lightly butter an 8 1/2-by-4 1/2 inch or 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. Line with parchment paper, leaving an overhang on both long sides (this will act as a sling to remove the cake easily from the pan). Bring cider to a boil on high heat in a saucepan reduce heat and simmer until reduced to 3/4 cup, about 8 to 10 minutes.

2. Pour 1/4 cup reduced cider into a small measuring glass or bowl and set aside. Transfer remaining reduced cider to a small bowl and let cool 5 minutes. Stir in sour cream and vanilla (don’t worry if there are small clumps of sour cream that don’t blend in — it will all work out in the mixer). Set aside.

3. Melt 8 tablespoons butter on low heat in same saucepan (no need to clean it). Let cool slightly. In separate bowl, whisk flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, 1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal or 1/2 teaspoon Morton kosher salt, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg in a medium bowl to combine.

4. In a stand mixer bowl, add eggs and 3/4 cup sugar beat on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes, scraping down sides if needed. On medium speed add butter in a thin steam, beating until thoroughly combined. Reserve saucepan. On low-medium speed, add flour mixture in 3 additions, alternating with reserved sour cream mixture in 2 additions beat until combined, scraping down sides as needed. Batter will be thin. Scrape into pan with a silicone spatula. Place on rimmed baking sheet.

5. Bake, rotating halfway through, until deep golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 65 to 75 minutes. Transfer pan to wire rack and poke top of cake all over with a toothpick. Spoon 3 tablespoons reserved reduced cider over (I found that it helped to spread the cider around with a pastry brush) let cool 10 minutes.

6. Meanwhile, mix a pinch of salt (tiny if using salted butter, large if using unsalted butter), remaining 1/4 cup sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, and 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg in a small bowl. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon butter in the reserved saucepan and mix into reduced cider.

7. Using parchment paper, lift cake onto rack and set rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Peel away parchment from sides. Brush warm butter mixture over top and sides of cake. Sprinkle generously with sugar mixture to coat every surface (use parchment to help rotate the cake and collect any excess sugar). Remove parchment and let cool completely before slicing.

Do ahead: Cake can be made 4 days ahead. Store cool cake airtight at room temperature.

Source: Adapted from Bon Appetit magazine

Homemade Raspberry Vinegar

Flavored vinegar in a fancy decanter is stylish enough to give as a gift. (Photo by Nick Koon)

Yield: About 8 ounces

INGREDIENTS

1 cup (about) good-quality red wine vinegar

PROCEDURE

1. Fill a clean pint jar with whole raspberries, pressing down slightly to fit in jar snugly. Add enough vinegar to cover raspberries. Cover mixture and let macerate at room temperature for one week in a cool, dark location.

2. Set a strainer over a medium bowl line with a double layer of cheesecloth. Pour vinegar mixture through strainer. Gather corners of cheesecloth and twist to release juices just until thicker juices begin to strain from cheesecloth. Discard cheesecloth with solids. Pour vinegar into a clean 8-ounce bottle or jar.

Do ahead: Cover chill up to 6 months.

Limoncello can be used in baked goods and as a cocktail ingredient, but it is most often served ice cold right from the freezer. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Yield: 3 1/2 pints

INGREDIENTS

4 cups grain alcohol or high-proof vodka

3 cups simple syrup, see cook’s notes

Cook’s notes: For simple syrup — combine 2 1/2 cups water and 3 cups granulated sugar in medium saucepan. Stirring occasionally, bring mixture to boil over medium-high heat. Lower heat simmer about 3 minutes to dissolve sugar. Cool.

PROCEDURE

1. Wash, dry and peel lemons, using a swivel-bladed vegetable peeler to cut wide strips without much pith (white portion). Put peels in a glass container with a tight-fitting lid. (Juice leftover lemons to use in drinks or in cooking — you can freeze it.)

2. Add grain alcohol or high-proof vodka and seal. Place in cool, dry spot away from sunlight. Let sit for 2 weeks.

3. Add simple syrup stir and reseal. Return to its spot. Let sit for 1 1/2 to 2 more weeks.

4. Strain liqueur through a double layer of cheesecloth into a pitcher or other easy-pouring vessel. Strain again through two new layers of cheesecloth into one large bottle or several small bottles or jars.

Chocolate Chip Banana Bread

A loaf of Chocolate Chip Banana Bread is great to give as a present, but you can also keep one for yourself. (Photo by Cathy Thomas)

Yield: 2 loaves

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

4 ripe bananas, peeled and mashed

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

6 ounces semisweet chocolate chips, see cook’s notes

Cook’s notes: To quickly ripen unripe bananas for baking, bake them unpeeled on a baking sheet at 250 degrees until soft, about 15-20 minutes. Do ahead: Banana bread can be baked, cooled, then wrapped in plastic and left at room temperature up to 3 days, or frozen up to 3 months. The easiest way to mash bananas is to process them in a food processor fitted with the metal blade. I prefer the small semisweet chocolate chips, often labeled “mini.”

PROCEDURE

1. Generously spray 2 loaf pans (either 8-by-3 3/4-by-2 3/8-inch aluminum pans or 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-by-2 1/2-inch glass pans) with non-stick spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Place butter and sugar in large bowl of the electric mixer mix until well blended and light in color. Add milk, mashed bananas, eggs and vanilla mix until blended.

3. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt, and baking soda stir with a whisk to combine. Add dry ingredients to butter-sugar mixture in two batches, mixing just until blended between additions scrape down sides and bottom of bowl as needed. Stir in chocolate chips. Place in prepared loaf pans. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 60 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack.

Do-Ahead: If desired, wrap cooled quick bread loaves in plastic wrap and aluminum foil. Freeze for up to 2 months. Or, cooled and wrapped airtight, it can sit at room temperature up to 3 days.