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Salmonella Outbreak Sickens 78 in Texas

Salmonella Outbreak Sickens 78 in Texas

Salmonella in Northwestern Texas may be spreading after an outbreak at a steakhouse

A sampling of smoked meat from the restaurant where the outbreak originated.

A recent salmonella outbreak in Northwestern Texas has sickened 78 people since the beginning of February. More cases have sprung up in Bushland and Amarillo, according to Food Safety News that may or may not originate from the restaurant.

When the news first came out in February, Ten in Texas steakhouse voluntarily closed for a week for sanitization and cleaning. In the days after opening, 12 more cases were observed, and a lawsuit was filed against the restaurant.

“Based on our ongoing investigation and further recommendations, the restaurant has since made some additional changes,” Texas Health Department officials told The Daily Meal. “There have been no cases identified since those changes were made. We conducted a full inspection of the restaurant and did not find any issues that would cause us to determine that the restaurant should not be operating. We are closely monitoring the situation, and will continue our epidemiological investigation to hopefully determine a source.”

Whether you live in Northwestern Texas or not, here are some tips for avoiding food poisoning.


Salmonella Braenderup Outbreak Sickens 79 in the US, 73 in California, 6 in Washington and 22 in Canada

California has had 73 cases of Salmonella Braenderup, and 67% of those people reported that they ate mangoes. Washington State has had six cases of Salmonella Braenderup that match the genetic fingerprint of the Canadian cases but has not yet linked them directly to the Mexican mangoes. Canada reports that mangoes are linked to 22 infections in Canada with Salmonella Braenderup.

Brazilian Mangoes 1999: A nationwide outbreak of a single strain of Salmonella Newport sickened 78 and was associated with the consumption of imported mangoes. The implicated mangoes were traced back to a single Brazilian farm. Salmonella and E. coli were isolated from water and other environmental samples of the farm. Water treatment was identified as a possible source of contamination. The mangoes destined for the US market were dipped in hot water, then cool water, a procedure that may have caused Salmonella on the surface of the fruit to be drawn inside. The hot dip water was not chlorinated. The cool dip water was chlorinated once a week chlorine levels were not monitored. The mangoes were coated in wax mixed with chlorinated water. The farm also shipped mangoes to Europe. These mangoes did not receive the same hot/cold water bath treatment the mangoes did not lead to illness in Europe.

Mangoes 2001: A multistate outbreak, with 26 ill, of Salmonella was associated with the consumption of fresh mangoes. The Salmonella Saintpaul isolates were genetically the same. In processing the mangoes for the US market, the mangoes were given a water treatment that was not likely to be chlorinated adequately. Some of the mangoes originated in Peru. A Salmonella outbreak in 1999 related to mangoes resulted in the USDA recommending chlorination for water treatment of mangoes. Unfortunately these recommendations were not published until 2002 after this outbreak had occurred.

Meanwhile, the second lawsuit against Chamberlain Farms, the grower of cantaloupes in a Salmonella typhimurium outbreak that has sickened 178 nationally, will be filed tomorrow in Michigan state court. To date, the number of ill persons identified in each state is as follows: Alabama (13), Arkansas (3), California (2), Georgia (3), Illinois (21), Indiana (18), Iowa (7), Kentucky (56), Massachusetts (2), Michigan (6), Minnesota (4), Mississippi (5), Missouri (12), New Jersey (2), North Carolina (3), Ohio (4), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (3), Tennessee (6), Texas (2), and Wisconsin (4). 62 ill persons have been hospitalized. Two deaths have been reported in Kentucky.

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s. He has worked on landmark&hellip

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s. He has worked on landmark cases that have helped shape food safety policy, HACCP protocol, and consumer rights, such as the E. coli outbreak in fresh spinach in 2006 and the 2008 Peanut Corporation of America outbreak of Salmonella. A frequent speaker for the not-for-profit organization Outbreak, Inc, Mr. Falkenstein travels the country to address public and environmental health organizations as well as food safety meetings and annual educational conferences. He speaks on the intersection of law and public health, and addresses companies on how to prevent food borne illness outbreaks.


Salmonella: 1,017 Sick Peppers Suspected

July 9, 2008 -- The CDC today warned that people at high risk of severe cases of salmonella infection -- infants, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems -- should not eat raw jalapeno peppers or raw serrano peppers because of the ongoing salmonella outbreak.

"Other persons who want to reduce their risk of salmonella infection can take similar precautions," Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, deputy director of the CDC's Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, said today at a news conference.

That doesn't mean that tomatoes are off the hook. Health officials haven't changed their recommendations about what tomatoes are safe to eat, and tomatoes are still a prime suspect in the salmonella outbreak, which has sickened at least 1,017 people, including a Texas man in his 80s who died and at least 203 people who were hospitalized.

The salmonella outbreak is the largest food-borne outbreak of any kind in the U.S. in the past decade, says Tauxe.

The FDA hasn't asked restaurants or grocery stores to pull jalapeno or serrano peppers there is no pepper recall. Health officials are also investigating fresh cilantro but haven't made any recommendations about cilantro consumption.

Continued

At least 300 people who came down with salmonella infection from the outbreak became sick on or after June 1.Those recent cases are the basis for the CDC's new advice on jalapeno and serrano peppers. Based on that data, Tauxe says jalapeno peppers apparently caused some -- but not all -- of those illnesses.

Salmonella infection (salmonellosis) can cause diarrhea (which may be bloody), fever, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Symptoms typically start 12-72 hours after infection.

The CDC has gotten reports of salmonella infection from people in 41 states and Washington, D.C., as well as four Canadians, three of whom apparently became infected while traveling in the U.S.

Patients have ranged in age from less than 1 to 99 years old most are in their 20s, according to the CDC's information on 744 of the salmonella patients.

Certain types of tomatoes started out as the leading suspects in the outbreak, but the FDA recently began testing cilantro, jalapeno peppers, and serrano peppers -- all typical salsa ingredients -- for Salmonella saintpaul, the rare salmonella strain implicated in the outbreak.

Sources

Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, deputy director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC.


Salmonella in Peaches Has Sickened 78 in 12 States

Aug. 28, 2020 -- A salmonella outbreak linked to recalled peaches from Prima Wawona and Wawona Packing Co. LLC has now sickened 78 people in 12 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in an update Thursday.

It said that 23 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported.

Prima Wawona has expanded its recall to include bulk/loose peaches sold until Aug. 3. Previously, the company recalled peaches sold in bags.

Several other companies have recalled Prima Wawona peaches or food made with them, including Aldi, Food Lion, Hannaford, Kroger, and affiliated retailers Target, Walmart and Wegmans.

Russ David Wholesale recalled peach salsa and gift baskets made with recalled Prima Wawona peaches. The recalled peach salsa was sold under three brand names and labeled as "Perfectly Peach Salsa."

Consumers and others should not eat, serve, or sell recalled peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Co. LLC, or food made with these peaches, the CDC said.

If you have loose peaches and don't know where they're from, throw them out, the agency advised.


Salmonella Outbreak Sickens 307 in 37 States

FRIDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) ---- More than 300 people in 37 states have been sickened to date in a major multistate outbreak of salmonella infection linked to baby poultry, U.S. government health officials reported Friday.

The report showed that 307 people have become infected with Salmonella Typhimurium, and that 60 percent of them were children aged 10 or younger.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a news release, said "Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback findings have linked this outbreak . to contact with chicks, ducklings, and other live baby poultry purchased from multiple feed stores and sourced from multiple mail-order hatcheries."

According to the CDC, the number of ill persons identified in each state was: Alabama (1), Arizona (7), California (9), Colorado (37) Florida (5), Georgia (4), Idaho (3), Illinois (1), Indiana (10), Iowa (7), Kansas (15), Kentucky (4), Louisiana (9), Massachusetts (2), Minnesota (3), Mississippi (6), Missouri (18), Montana (2), Nebraska (14), Nevada (1), New Hampshire (1), New Mexico (16), New York (17), North Dakota (5), Oklahoma (15), Oregon (10), South Carolina (1), Tennessee (2), Texas (32), Utah (10), Vermont (1), Washington (19), West Virginia (1), Wisconsin (5), and Wyoming (4).

Continued

The CDC also said that among the 193 sickened persons with available information, 25 percent have been hospitalized.

The earliest date of reported illness associated with this six-month outbreak was March 4. But efforts to determine the ultimate source of the infected poultry have been challenging because of the complicated distribution network for these birds, the CDC said.

To guard against infection, the agency urged consumers to always wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water right after touching live poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam.


Salmonella outbreak in Sweden sickens 12

The Swedish Public Health Agency is reporting a nationwide Salmonella outbreak.

Salmonella bacteria (red)/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Twelve cases of Salmonella Enteritidis disease have been linked using whole genome sequencing (analysis of the bacterium’s genome). Eight of the twelve patients are children under the age of ten and the cases are resident in ten different regions. All cases except one have fallen ill on January 20 or later. There are as many women / girls as men / boys who that have fallen ill.

The affected infection control units and the Swedish Public Health Agency are jointly investigating the outbreak to identify the source of the infection.

In Sweden, less than one percent of all food-producing animals and foods are infected with salmonella, unlike most other countries in Europe, where it is common for, for example, raw chicken and eggs to be contaminated with salmonella. In most European countries (except Norway, Finland and Sweden) Salmonella Enteritidis from eggs and chicken is a particularly big problem.

In 2019, 1993 cases of salmonella infection were reported, corresponding to an incidence of 19 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence of domestic cases has been stable over time (7.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants in 2019), while the incidence of infections outside Sweden continues to decrease. Of those infected abroad (n = 1215), most were infected in Thailand, Turkey, Spain, Egypt and Greece.


Salmonella Sproutbreak Sickens 87 in 11 States

As of December 2, 2014, a total of 87 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from 11 states.

State Ill persons
Connecticut 7
Maine 3
Massachusetts 35
Montana 1
New Hampshire 4
New York 14
Ohio 3
Pennsylvania 10
Rhode Island 6
Vermont 3
Virginia 1
Total ill persons 87

Twenty-seven percent of ill persons have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory conducted antibiotic resistance testing on Salmonella Enteritidis isolates collected from three ill persons infected with the outbreak strains.

All three isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics tested on the NARMS panel.

Collaborative investigation efforts of state, local, and federal public health and regulatory agencies indicate that bean sprouts produced by Wonton Foods, Inc. are the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, 42 (78%) of 54 ill persons reported eating bean sprouts or menu items containing bean sprouts in the week before becoming ill.

Wonton Foods, Inc. continues to cooperate with state and federal public health and agriculture officials.

On November 21, 2014, Wonton Foods, Inc. agreed to destroy any remaining products while they conducted thorough cleaning and sanitization and implemented other Salmonella control measures. On November 24, the firm completed cleaning and sanitization and restarted production of bean sprouts. The firm resumed shipment on November 29, 2014

Contaminated bean sprouts produced by Wonton Foods, Inc. are likely no longer available for purchase or consumption given the maximum 12-day shelf life of mung bean sprouts.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.


Texas Salmonella Outbreak at 59 Cases Lawsuit Filed

At least 59 people have reportedly been sickened in a Salmonella outbreak connected in part to the Ten in Texas steakhouse in Dalhart, TX. One of the restaurant’s customers who was sickened, Frances Childers, is &hellip
Continue Reading Texas Salmonella Outbreak at 59 Cases Lawsuit Filed


Peaches Recalled in 34 States as Salmonella Outbreaks Continue

At least 78 people in 12 states have been sickened by an outbreak of salmonella found in loose peaches and other peach products. As a result, a recall has been expanded and officials are urging anyone who purchased peaches in the affected states to be extremely cautious and/or discard their peaches altogether.

stay safe Salmonella & Foodborne Illnesses Are Spiking: Here's How to Protect Yourself All of the 78 illnesses were reported between June 29 and Aug. 3, but officials say there is potential for more because of a sometimes weeks-long lag between poisoning, side effects, and reporting. “Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks,” the CDC said. Of the cases, 23 victims were hospitalized, according to the official statement . No deaths have been reported from the outbreak thus far.

According to the official FDA report , the peaches in question were shipped to multiple retailers in more than 30 states and originated from California-based Prima Wawona Packing Company LLC. More than a dozen retailers including Aldi, Food Lion, Kroger, Walmart, Target. Wegmans and Hannaford have already recalled the peaches and peach products containing the potentially infected stone fruit.

As of this reporting, bagged peaches, loose peaches, and bulk peaches are under recall, along with peach salsa sold under three brand names but all labeled as Perfectly Peach Salsa. “If you can’t tell where the peaches are from, don’t eat them,” the CDC warned on its website Thursday.

The FDA has named 34 states in which the bad peaches may have been distributed for sale: Alaska, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

“FDA’s traceback investigation is ongoing to identify the source of this outbreak and to determine if potentially contaminated products have been shipped to additional retailers.”


Dalhart Ten in Texas Restaurant Salmonella Outbreak Expands Again

At least 78 people have now been sickened in a Salmonella outbreak affecting residents of northwestern Texas, according to various news reports.

A large portion of the patients are connected to the Ten in Texas steakhouse in Dalhart, TX, while more cases have sprung up in the communities of Bushland and Amarillo.

Health authorities have not been able to track down the exact source of the outbreak.

Ten in Texas voluntarily shut down for a short time last month for a thorough cleaning and sanitation process.

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s. He has worked on landmark&hellip

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s. He has worked on landmark cases that have helped shape food safety policy, HACCP protocol, and consumer rights, such as the E. coli outbreak in fresh spinach in 2006 and the 2008 Peanut Corporation of America outbreak of Salmonella. A frequent speaker for the not-for-profit organization Outbreak, Inc, Mr. Falkenstein travels the country to address public and environmental health organizations as well as food safety meetings and annual educational conferences. He speaks on the intersection of law and public health, and addresses companies on how to prevent food borne illness outbreaks.