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Man Sues Foster’s Beer for Not Being Brewed in Australia

Man Sues Foster’s Beer for Not Being Brewed in Australia

The plaintiff alleges that he and other consumers have been misled into believing that Foster’s beer is brewed in Australia

In the suit, Leif Nelson said that he would continue to purchase Foster’s if it is accurately labeled.

New York City resident Leif Nelson has filed a class action lawsuit against Miller Brewing Co. for its misleading depiction of Foster’s beer, which, given its well-known slogan of “Foster’s, Australian for Beer,” would suggest that Foster’s is brewed in Australia.

The lawsuit, filed in Brooklyn Federal Court, points out that Foster’s moved its brewing operation to Fort Worth, Texas, in 2011, but continued to advertise the beer as being imported from Australia. Another tagline for Foster’s reads, “How to speak Australian.”

Nelson, who contends that he and other consumers were misled through deceptive advertising, told the New York Daily News that he stopped buying Foster’s after he discovered the truth earlier this year, though he would be willing to resume purchasing it if Miller Brewing Co. labels Foster’s accurately in the future.

Meanwhile, a spokesman for MillerCoors told the Daily News that in Texas, Foster’s “even employs an Australian brewmaster so that the beer tastes as true to its origin as possible.”


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


7 Beers That Have Been Sued Over Where They're Brewed

When you’re ordering up a pint of Guinness at the pub or tipping back a Kirin with your sushi, you might assume you’re sipping on a fancy imported beer. But if you happen to be in the United States, chances are that beer was brewed a lot closer to home.

A spate of lawsuits have been filed against beers over whether or not their stated (or perceived) origin is accurate. Some are based on the (assumed) imported nature of the beer. Brands like Guinness, Kirin and Fosters all come laden with connotations that they’re from foreign countries—Ireland, Japan or Australia, respectively. But domestic beers aren’t safe from the ire of consumers either. Coors doesn’t brew the majority of it’s beer anywhere near the Rockies, and even Kona was called out for actually producing it’s products on the Lower 48.

When it comes to commercial beers like Budweiser and Miller, there&aposs likely less of a consumer expectation that they&aposre getting something from one specific facility tucked away in the hills of Missouri. But with the craft beer boom comes a wave of aficionados keen to know what story that beer has to tell. Part of that story, as it is with wine and whiskey, is just where that beer comes from. But the demands of a growing business also require even homegrown breweries to expand and open up production lines in other locations.

In one standout instance, a man even sued Leffe claiming he thought the beer was made in an actual Belgian Abbey. The beer, which is produced in Belgium, was taken to court over language on the label that stated 𠇋rewed and perfected by Belgian monks” and � years of Belgian tradition.”

So are customers taking their complaints too far? That&aposs for the beer community to decide.


Watch the video: Gabriel Fluffy Iglesias Ordered A Fosters Beer In Australia. Netflix Is A Joke (December 2021).