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Celebrity Chef Fined $1.3 Million for Metal Wire in Dish

Celebrity Chef Fined $1.3 Million for Metal Wire in Dish

Daniel Boulud’s hefty fine serves as a warning to the restaurant industry

The New York City restaurant has no explanation as to how the wire ended up in the meal.

Retired lawyer Barry Brett received more than he bargained for when he was served a piece of wire from a metal cleaning brush in his $32 plate of coq au vin in February 2015 at db Bistro Moderne, the Midtown restaurant in New York City owned by top celebrity chef Daniel Boulud.

Brett was awarded $300,000 in damages for injuries to his esophagus after swallowing the 1-inch bristle, and the restaurant received an additional $1 million penalty for the use of cheap metal brushes near food, the New York Post reported. The hefty fine serves as a warning, not only to Boulud, but also to the rest of the food industry, of the potential dangers of metal wire brushes in restaurant kitchens.

The Centers for Disease Control issued a warning in 2012 about a wire brush made in China being used in commercial kitchens, which was presented during the four-day trial by Brett’s attorney.

The jurors said they were shocked that such a high-profile, Michelin-starred chef had no preventative measures for incidents such as these, the Post reported.

The restaurant’s lawyer said he planned to appeal the verdict.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas, one of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened on January 19, 2019 and closed on March 31, 2019. First Chefs was co-curated by Associate Director for Fellowships at the Folger Institute Amanda E. Herbert and Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian of Audience Development Heather Wolfe, with assistance from Elizabeth DeBold, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This exhibition was done in association with Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute.

First Chefs told the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

Along the walls of the exhibition, the lives of early modern women and men—rich as well as poor, free and enslaved—who found, made, and ate food were revealed. Through their eyes, the exhibition explored gardens and farms, forests and rivers, plantations and fisheries, markets, kitchens, food stalls, and dining halls. At the center of the exhibition were the five “First Chefs,” whose stories were told through their written, material, and imagined legacy.

An interactive screen allowed visitors to page through digitally replicated versions of several of the Folger's manuscript receipt books, the largest collection of seventeenth-century English-language recipe books in the world. This interactive piece was created by Rebecca Niles.


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