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Halle Berry's Fiancé to Open Miami Restaurant

Halle Berry's Fiancé to Open Miami Restaurant

Olivier Martinez is bringing Saint-Tropez to South Beach

In the wake of his engagement to Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry, Olivier Martinez has something else up his sleeve.

Martinez, a French import, has paired up with friend Michael Martin and restaurateur Jean-Phillippe Bernard to bring a certain je ne sais quoi to Miami next month. The trio have come together over countless trips between South Beach and the South of France to create Villa Azur, a product of the two beloved vacation destinations.

"I love the interesting and international people I have met in Miami. So when my friend Michael Martin said he found a space for a restaurant and lounge where we could bring in the best aspects from the South of France, I was excited and wanted to get involved," Martinez told People.

The menu will reportedly have dishes like penne pasta with vodka and caviar cream sauce; a veal filet mignon stuffed with artichokes, tomatoes, and cheese; and an extensive wine selection in La Cave d'Azur, their private dining room and wine cellar. Perhaps this is how Martinez wined and dined Halle Berry herself.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


This tale needs a Hail Mary, not just Halle Berry / Star too weak to carry ludicrous 'Gothika'

Vanessa Redgrave has made a career out of saving second-rate scripts, Billy Bob Thornton redeems at least one dialogue-challenged film a year and Kevin "K-Pax" Spacey seems to be intentionally picking out ridiculous screenplays just to prove he can recite the lines with a straight face.

Halle Berry shows no such skills in "Gothika," and without her best game, the new movie has nothing to recommend it. Constantly bouncing from derivative to ridiculous and back to derivative again, "Gothika" will be tolerable for undiscriminating horror fans but should be shunned by everybody else.

Berry plays Miranda, a criminal psychologist working in the psych ward of a prison for women. She gets most of the screen time, with a few minutes each for her best friend, Pete (Robert Downey Jr.), disturbed patient Chloe (Penelope Cruz) and husband Douglas (Charles S. Dutton, in the most unbelievable husband-wife pairing this side of Sipowicz on "NYPD Blue").

After an unnerving session with Chloe, Miranda is confronted repeatedly by a pasty-looking blond girl, who communicates by slashing messages onto the skeptical doctor's forearm and scrawling letters in blood on her wall (no one sends a simple greeting card anymore). Before long, Miranda wakes up to find that she's committed a heinous crime, and her co-workers proceed to break every conflict-of-interest principle imaginable -- Miranda is treated in her own psych ward, where she interacts with old patients while being investigated for murder by the victim's fishing buddy and receiving psychological guidance from her best friend.

Throughout the journey, nothing about Berry's performance is particularly convincing. She doesn't act steely enough to be a doctor in a prison, and she doesn't have the range to pull off a slow descent into insanity.

Thankfully, the makers of "Gothika" spared no expense when they hired their actors, floating cash for Cruz, Downey Jr. (whose inclination to take drugs and crawl into a stranger's bed has made him an insurance risk) and Bernard Hill, who plays King Theoden in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.


Watch the video: Halle Berry And Baby At Sona Restaurant (November 2021).