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McDonald’s Mexico Claims Patron Planted Mouse Head in Their Burger; Plans to Sue

McDonald’s Mexico Claims Patron Planted Mouse Head in Their Burger; Plans to Sue

McDonald’s does not take responsibility for mouse head in burger and plans to sue the patron responsible for libel and slander

Shutterstock/McDonald's

This is a game of Mac and mouse.

One rodent has been causing a ruckus at a McDonald’s in Mexico, where a mouse head found in a burger caused the fast food restaurant to be shut down by the health department.

McDonald’s has not claimed ownership to the disgusting discovery, and instead said that the unwanted burger topping had been planted by an outsider. McDonald’s Mexico is launching an investigation to find the alleged perpetrator and will pursue legal action against the slanderous instigator.

Mexico’s health department, The Federal Commission for the Protection against Sanitary Risk, has confirmed that the mouse was not a part of the burger and was not placed during the cooking process.

In a statement distributed on social media, McDonald’s called the incident a “serious attack against the [restaurant’s] image.”

The dead mouse scandal occurred on November 9, at a restaurant in Tlalnepantla, north of Mexico City, when a customer complained about finding the dead mouse. The branch was closed for more than two weeks, and has since reopened.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


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