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8 Lighthouses in America Where You Can Spend the Night

8 Lighthouses in America Where You Can Spend the Night

Ever dream of spending your vacation living in a lighthouse? Make it a reality at these 8 American destinations

And they're not all in Maine! ...Even though this one is.

Once upon a time, when ships and boats were the only means of shipping and travel, lighthouse were incredibly important. These shining beacons helped aid captains who had to navigate their ships in darkness, fog, and rain without the help of GPS or other advanced technology. Even today, some of these towers are still operational and continue to serve their primary purpose.

Click here for 8 Lighthouses in America Where You Can Spend the Night

If you’ve ever dreamt of the peace, serenity, and breathtaking views that staying in a lighthouse could provide, you’ll be pleased to know that you don’t have to be a park ranger of other qualified individual to stay in one of these beauties.

But before we continue, let’s clarify something: When we’re talking about lighthouses where you can spend the night, we’re not just referring to cottages, hotels, and houses for rent that are adjacent to a lighthouse, have a lighthouse on the property, or provide access to a lighthouse, but ones where you can sleep inside the actual facility.

Some accommodations actually require guests to do quite a bit of work, but since you’re likely planning for a vacation, we didn’t include those examples here (but perhaps you’ll see them in a later article). Whether part of a hotel, bed and breakfast, or just a tower for rent, here are eight lighthouses in America where you can spend the night.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


5 Charming Lighthouses That You Can Actually Sleep In

Some U.S. lighthouses take on volunteer lightkeepers others, like the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, operate as bed-and-breakfasts.

These historic structures are perfect shoreside escapes, whether you’ve dreamed of living the life of a lightkeeper or simply need a cozy vacation on the water.

L ighthouses once served as important beacons, helping ships navigate hazardous coastlines and find safe passage into harbors. But with the advance of GPS and other modern technologies, many of these structures have been relegated to the role of helpful backups, and some have been retired. But functioning or not, scores of lighthouses have found new purpose attracting not weary mariners but throngs of camera-toting tourists.

“The inherent beauty of lighthouses, starkly etched against the sky, is undeniably a big part of what makes them so alluring,” says Eric Jay Dolin, author of Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse. “But America’s intrinsic fascination with lighthouses runs deeper than that. Over three centuries, these brilliant beacons have indelibly woven themselves into the American fabric, and it is this rich history more than anything else that draws us in.”

Many lighthouses in the United States actually take in short-term boarders, giving visitors a taste of lightkeeper life and allowing them to connect more deeply with local and maritime history. Some operate as bed-and-breakfasts, while others expect guests to pitch in by cleaning bathrooms or logging a few hours in a visitor center or gift shop.

The following architecturally appealing or historically interesting light stations welcome overnight guests and are all within an easy drive of major metropolitan areas. To find more pay-to-stay lighthouses, visit the United States Lighthouse Society website.


Watch the video: Lighthouses of the Southeast (December 2021).