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Chipotle Pozole

Chipotle Pozole

To cook the chicken:

1

fresh farm raised chicken

2

teaspoons of Mexican dried oregano

1

tablespoon of ground cumin

2

teaspoons of chicken base stock or chicken bouillon granules

For the hot sauce:

1

tablespoon ground cumin

For the Pozole:

1

whole chicken cooked and shredded (no skin, no bones)

4

cups chicken broth (the broth resulted when cooking the chicken, just strain to remove debris)

3

cups canned hominy corn

2

teaspoons Mexican dried oregano, desired

1

tablespoon of ground cumin

To garnish:

2

cups radishes cleaned and cut in rounds (around 2 bunches)

2

cups chopped fresh white onion

2

cups shredded iceberg lettuce

4

to 6 limes cut in quarters

Hot sauce and dried Mexican oregano

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  • 1

    For cooking the chicken:Clean the chicken cut in parts and place inside a 4 quart Dutch Oven with all the ingredients. Simmer about 2 hours or until juice of chicken is clear when thickest part is cut to bone (170°F for breasts; 180°F for thighs and legs). Remove out cooked chicken and shred removing bones and skin. Strain the broth and save for pozole soup. You can cook and prep the chicken a day in advance.

  • 2

    For cooking the sauce:Clean chiles by removing stems, place all ingredients in a deep sauce pan cook for 20 minutes at low temperature until chiles are soft. Place all cooked ingredients in the blender but only add 1 cup of the liquid where chiles were cooked with; blend well. Stir in more liquid as needed, consistency should be runny but not watery. Store in glass container and keep for later use. This sauce freezes well and it is the base for preparing other Mexican dishes like red enchiladas.

  • 3

    For cooking the pozole:Place soup pan on stovetop over low heat. Stir in the chicken stock, the hominy and the shredded meat; add water and seasonings and let simmer for 30 minutes. The more you simmer the best the broth will taste, flavors need time to develop.

  • 4

    To serve:Serve soup in bowl, garnish with lettuce, radishes, fresh onion, a pinch of oregano and drizzle with lime juice and hot sauce. You can place the garnishes in the middle of the table and let your guests choose their favorite combinations.

Expert Tips

  • Soups need time for flavors to develop, be patient and cook your pozole at low heat. Cook your chicken and hot sauce a day in advance to manage your time. As any traditional recipe requires time and effort but results are amazing.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Pozole or Pozolli –original name in Náhuatl– is a traditional dish from Mexico consumed by the Aztec ancestors on special sacred occasions and celebrations. Nowadays this soup is culinary staple of the states of Sinaloa, Jalisco, Morelos, Michoacán and DF. Each state has different interpretation though all recipes have one original ingredient in common: dried maize or “maíz” known in the United States as hominy.My recipe today is inspired in the original but using chicken instead of pork and adding chipotle to the chile sauce. This soup is hearty and great for cold weather; it will warm your heart and your soul.I invite you to enjoy this traditional Mexican dish and serve to your family and friends.Let’s cook!

Using the sauté setting, heat oil in a 6- to 8-quart pressure cooker. Add the onion, season it with salt and cook, stirring often, until the onion is softened and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until slightly softened and fragrant, 2 minutes. Turn the sauté setting off.

Open the can of chipotles and remove the chiles, leaving as much of the adobo sauce behind as possible. (Scrape the sauce off the chiles with your fingers as best you can.) Set the chiles aside and add the adobo sauce to the pressure cooker. Chop 1 to 4 of the chiles until they are almost a paste. (Determine the number of chiles according to your desired level of heat: 1 chile for a very mild soup and 4 for a very spicy soup.) Add the chiles to the pressure cooker. (Store remaining chiles in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 5 days and in the freezer indefinitely.)

Using the sauté setting, add onion and garlic powders, cumin and oregano to the pressure cooker. Cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant and heated through, about 1 minute. Stir in the chicken until coated, scraping the bottom of the pan. Add the broth and 1/2 teaspoon salt (but hold off on the salt if you are using fully salted broth.) Close the lid and cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.

Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes, then release remaining pressure manually. (If hot liquid spurts out of the knob along with the steam, carefully close it and wait 5 more minutes before releasing remaining pressure.) Using a ladle, skim excess fat from the surface of the soup, if desired.

Using the sauté setting, coarsely shred the chicken in the pot using 2 forks. Add the corn and the pozole and simmer until warmed through, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and taste add more salt or lime juice if necessary. Serve the soup in bowls with the toppings of choice.


Everything You Can Do With a Can of Chipotles in Adobo

Take away my fancy olive oil, my spices, the peppers I've been air-drying in my fridge. Take my copper-lined sauciers and vintage cast iron. You can have it all, as long as I get to keep my chipotles in adobo.

Because these little buggers can do it all it's easier to think of cooking applications where chipotles in adobo don't fit in rather than the other way around. How many ingredients are equally at home in sauces, glazes, marinades, braises, soups, sandwiches, beans, and then some? We're talking top-level pantry stuff here, olive oil and vinegar territory.

If you've never tried them, a quick primer. Chipotles in adobo are smoked and dried jalapeños rehydrated and canned in a sweet and tangy purée of tomato, vinegar, garlic, and some other spices, for a ruddy sauce that packs wicked heat but with plenty of balance and body. They're complex enough to use as a solo seasoning but friendly enough to play well with others—more chilies, fresh herbs, honey, vinegar, dairy, you name it.

A can costs just a few dollars and will keep pretty much forever, so there are few reasons to not keep a couple dozen around. Even when opened, the chilies last for weeks (at least) right in the can. I usually purée them and their sauce into a paste, then transfer to tupperware or an ice cube tray for long-term storage.

So what can you do with these smoky-sweet blobs? How about.

Sauces and Condiments

I'm prone to eat adobo sauce straight from the can, but it takes well to dilution with fat and sugar. Mix it with mayo and sour cream for a subtly smoky crema to drizzle over tacos, or use it to spice up ketchup with bittersweet orange juice.

Braises and Chili

You want deeply flavored, smoky, and rich real-deal Texas chili? Chipotles are the answer. They also add incredible depth to braises like barbacoa and chicken tinga, both of which are ready taco fodder.

Soup and Beans

Chipotles add meaty depth to meatless cooking, and I love how their smoky intensity plays with earthy beans. Throw them into some lazy black beans or use them to amp up vegan refried beans. Or add a couple to gild the lily on this black bean soup with tender chicken and fatty Spanish chorizo.

Sandwiches and Tacos

Chipotles are essential to a proper cemita and great on a shrimp and cheese torta. And they're killer with egg sandwiches, here blended into guacamole or mayo. And let's not forget about tacos fry up some Mexican chorizo and add chipotle for an extra jolt of spice.

Marinade and Glazes

If you're grilling or roasting, chipotles pull double duty as both marinade and glaze. Try this smoky-sweet pork loin with orange and brown sugar, or these pork ribs, where the chipotle's intensity is mellowed out by apricots.


Mexican Chicken Pozole Soup Recipe


If you’ve been reading this blog awhile or have visited my About Page, you probably know that I was exposed to authentic Mexican food at a very early age. Although I only lived in Tucson the first six months of my life, we traveled back almost every spring break of my childhood. While the rest of Michigan was at Disney World, we were relaxing in the desert avoiding the long lines and overpriced junk food. I will forever be grateful.

During our week in Arizona, my parents would take us on a day trip to Nogales, Mexico located an hour and a half south of Tucson. From the minute we crossed the border, the smell of homemade corn tortillas, fresh cilantro and warm spices would fill the air. It was completely intoxicating and was the start of my lifelong love affair with authentic Mexican food.

This Mexican Chicken Posole Soup is a weeknight version of the classic dish. To save time, I use rotisserie chicken but any leftover shredded meat would work including pork or even beef. My husband loves carrots so I tend to add them to every soup but you could swap out for zucchini or skip if you don’t have on hand.

Whatever you do, take 15 minutes and whip up a batch of Smoky Corn Tortilla Chips to serve along side. We also enjoyed a green cabbage version of my Mexican Slaw with Honey Lime Vinaigrette.


Mexican Pozole – Keto Low Carb Recipe

This recipe is an entry for the Kevin’s Natural Foods recipe challenge. The contest requested clean keto, paleo, dairy-free and gluten-free recipes. For this recipe, I decided to use taco sauce in a less traditional way. Keto pozole is what came out of my kitchen! Traditional Mexican pozole has a fair amount of carbs since it uses hominy as one of the main ingredients.

I paired this recipe with a Dry Farm Wines light, Austrian red. Be sure to check out my review of Dry Farm Wines. Their wine is all tested to be under one gram of sugar in the entire bottle and won’t kick you out of ketosis!

You can find out more about Kevin’s Natural foods on their Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest pages.

Disclaimer: Links may contain affiliate links, which means we may get paid a commission at no additional cost to you if you purchase through this page. Read our full disclosure here.

Making Keto Pozole

Traditional pozole calls for pork but I wanted to use chicken thighs for a slightly lighter flavor. If you can’t find Kevin’s Classic Taco sauce, just substitute the same amount of your favorite salsa. Puree it first so it has a similar texture to the sauce.

However, finding the sauce for this keto pozole really isn’t difficult. You can order it from their website or on Amazon.

It’s also fairly traditional for pozole to be spicy. I love hot foods, so this was a no brainer for me. If you prefer to walk on the mild side, leave out the chipotle in adobo and make sure you taste the sauce first. If you find the sauce to be too spicy for your liking simply wait until the end to add Kevin’s sauce as your final ingredient to the keto pozole.

The contest called for dairy-free recipes. If you don’t have issues with dairy though, you can kick this already delicious soup up a notch by garnishing it with some sour cream and queso fresco.

Cauliflower basically substitutes for any higher carb item in so many recipes these days. It’s so easy to make into rice it at home too, even if you don’t have a food processor. I created a guide for you to easily make cauliflower rice three ways.

The very easiest way is to buy it frozen and it’s great to have in the freezer so you have a keto-friendly substitute any time you need it. However, doing it yourself is slightly cheaper and you can freeze it in that case as well.

To make the texture of this keto pozole more like the real thing, you could cut your cauliflower into larger pieces. I used the riced version here just because it’s so convenient.

US Wellness Meats is always a great place to find high quality, soy-free chicken and pork.

I recently made this recipe and chatted about keto for a local morning show. Check it out below!


Chipotle Pozole - Recipes

Adobe Chef is a Santa Fe competition based on Iron Chef (Japanese version, not America) pitting ex-restaurateur members of a martini happy hour group against each other.

One of the NET MAN Project Managers, Samsunshine Levy accepted the inaugural challenge - to cook the best Spaghetti Carbonara - pitted against another former chef. After an hour of intense cooking, lots of wine and judging by their peers, Sam emerged the first and reigning chamption of Adobe Chef.

KD's Famous Posole Recipe

(This is a stew, not a side dish)
What you will need:

Heavy stock pot (or Large Oval Crock Pot)
and a Medium Large Skillet if using a crock pot to stew in.

Garlic, garlic and more garlic (about 8 cloves, peeled & chopped)

Onion, onion and more onion (3-4 onions depending on size, chopped)

Oregano (flakes) – smell it, if it fills your senses and you think you are in Little Italy, NYC – that’s good! (2 tablespoons or so)

Flour (for dredging the pork).

Olive Oil – Everybody likes an Extra Virgin (about 1/4 cup).

Butter – The Real Deal (1/2 stick).

Pork for Stewing (about 1.5 pounds - more if you want, cut into 3/4 inch cubes).

2 large cans (49.5 oz. each) Swanson's chicken stock

1 bag Refrigerated or Frozen "half-processed" Posole (NOT dry, NOT canned), wash it good and pick out the bad ones.

4 to 8 Dried Chipotle Pods (NOT canned!) – KD’s secret ingredient. Sometimes I have trouble finding this in Albertson’s even though I’ve begged them to supply it regularly – Now I just go right to The Market Place to buy it. They have a tall stand of specialties with the Chipole Pods right there. Use about 4 for a mild posole, 6 for medium and 8 for hot. The chipotles need time to release their essence, which is why this is always better and richer the next day. If you don't have dried chipotle, then the canned in adobo can work - just make sure that you don't use any other type of red chile (Sam likes to add some roasted green at the end, though)

Since most of the ingredients are already in your kitchen you’ll say to yourself, “wow, I love this, it’s really inexpensive & easy to make!”

How to put it together:

Dredge the pork in flour, then brown in stock pot (or skillet if you'll be using a crock pot) over medium high heat in 2-3 tablespoons canola oil until browned on all sides. Add onions and garlic with olive oil and butter and saute until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the fresh/frozen posole to the onions along with the two large cans of chicken stock, rub the oregano flakes between your hands into the pot and add the chipotle pods. Bring to boil and let simmer, covered, for several hours until the posole pops open. As it simmers, replenish or add water as needed so that it doesn't become too salty. Salt to taste and serve with chopped onions and shredded cheese.

Kristin's Posole Background

If you are at this part of the Website you were probably one of the many people who have been so wonderful with your compliments toward the posole I made for the MLS meetings. I’m so grateful to everyone of you who have been so kind and appreciative of my efforts. How wonderful it feels to be appreciated for something you do, or cook! With all the love I’ve received for my efforts I am sharing the recipe and will spread the gift of appreciation to others in my travels…it’s truly wonderful to feel appreciated by those in your everyday life. And I thank you!

For those of you who were wondering. Yes, I’m a bicoastal. Originally born in Greenwhich Village NYC and raised on the Jersey Shore (please don’t hate me). I then lived in Los Angeles pursuing my singing career and ended up working in David Geffen’s Music Company, Geffen Records he eventually sold and became one of the biggest moguls in the world. He now has DreamWorks Productions with Steven Speilberg and David Katzenburg. David Geffen used to salute me as he would walk into his building for work in the morning on Sunset Blvd. but that’s a whole other story and you are here for the Posole Recipe. I did want to give a bit of my background because I could tell some of you knew I was not a native of this state and I could also tell you wondered how the heck did I make the posole then, with so much New Mexico soul.

When I first arrived in New Mexico as a youngster in my mid twenties I was turned on to Posole by a co-worker and on those mornings we just didn’t feel quite like yourself (dacing at Club West a little too long on a school night) – we would go to the Baja Tacos off Cerrillos Road and order a bowl of posole to go with onions and shredded cheese. I couldn’t believe how great you could feel after a bowl of this on those “off” mornings. It was some kind of magic cure! I never thought I could attempt to make such a thing, but one day years later, I was craving this posole so much I felt desperate and couldn’t find the recipe anywhere. I didn’t have any family here to ask since I wasn’t from here so I decided to do the next best thing, run to the local Pojoaque Market and ask anyone I met in the aisle whom I thought would know. Some people thought I was crazy, and stayed clear of me, but one fellow, a bit rough looking I might say, after I asked him got the huge-est grin on his face and I knew then that I had my recipe. He gave me the basics and said “taste it”, you’ll know it’s the best thing for a “hangover” and also gave me one big tip. “Don’t use any of that fancy dried posole those gringos are buying.” “Buy the already half-processed in the refrigerated section posole, wash it good and pick out the bad ones”. “You’ll probably only need half the bag.”

That was it, it was that simple. Over the years I’ve added my way of doing things to the basic mix and have come to the point where I’m quite pleased with it to the point I can now call this my own recipe. And thank you whoever you are that day in The Pojoaque Market who gave me my first lesson.



Chicken Chipotle Pozole and Picadillo

Step 1: Using the sauté setting, heat oil in a 6- to 8-quart pressure cooker. Add the onion, season it with salt and cook, stirring often, until the onion is softened and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until slightly softened and fragrant, 2 minutes. Turn the sauté setting off.

Step 2: Open the can of chipotles and remove the chiles, leaving as much of the adobo sauce behind as possible. (Scrape the sauce off the chiles with your fingers as best you can.) Set the chiles aside and add the adobo sauce to the pressure cooker. Chop 1 to 4 of the chiles until they are almost a paste. (Determine the number of chiles according to your desired level of heat: 1 chile for a very mild soup and 4 for a very spicy soup.) Add the chiles to the pressure cooker. (Store remaining chiles in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 5 days and in the freezer indefinitely.)

Step 3: Using the sauté setting, add onion and garlic powders, cumin and oregano to the pressure cooker. Cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant and heated through, about 1 minute. Stir in the chicken until coated, scraping the bottom of the pan. Add the broth and 1/2 teaspoon salt (but hold off on the salt if you are using fully salted broth.) Close the lid and cook on high pressure for 18 minutes.

Step 4: Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes, then release remaining pressure manually. (If hot liquid spurts out of the knob along with the steam, carefully close it and wait 5 more minutes before releasing remaining pressure.) Using a ladle, skim excess fat from the surface of the soup, if desired.

Step 5: Using the sauté setting, coarsely shred the chicken in the pot using 2 forks. Add the corn and the pozole and simmer until warmed through, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and taste add more salt or lime juice if necessary. Serve the soup in bowls with the toppings of choice.


Directions

  1. Cook the bacon in a medium pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until crispy and browned, about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in 1 to 2 teaspoons of the chipotles (depending on heat preference).
  2. Add the clam juice or stock, water, thyme, potatoes, and hominy, and bring to a boil. Season lightly with salt and pepper and cook over medium heat until the potatoes are tender, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, remove the skin and any pin bones from the fish and cut into 1-inch pieces. Whisk the flour into the half & half until no lumps remain, then stir into the soup and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium-low heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the fish and cook until just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the cilantro and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with tortilla chips and more chipotle if desired. Enjoy!

*The information displayed is our analysis of the recipe based on its ingredients and preparation, and should not be considered a substitute for professional nutrition advice.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 ½ pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 ½ quarts chicken broth
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon crumbled dried oregano
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 tablespoons chili powder, or to taste
  • 3 cups white hominy, rinsed and drained
  • 10 tostada shells

Heat 2 tablespoons canola oil in a deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken breasts, and cook until no longer pink and juices run clear, about 20 minutes. Remove from skillet, drain, and cool. When completely cooled, shred chicken with a fork.

Heat remaining 2 tablespoons canola oil in the same skillet over medium-high heat. Cook and stir onion and garlic until soft and transparent, about 5 minutes. Return shredded chicken to the skillet. Stir in the chicken broth, water, oregano, salt, and chili powder. Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook about 90 minutes. Stir in the hominy and cook until tender, about 15 minutes more. Taste to adjust seasonings, adding more salt and chili powder, if desired. Serve in soup bowls with1 tostada shell per serving. Garnish as desired.


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