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Tekka Don No Poke (Hawaiian Poke-Style Tuna Rice Bowl)

Tekka Don No Poke (Hawaiian Poke-Style Tuna Rice Bowl)

Recipe excerpted from 'Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking' by Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto

Once you secure sushi- grade tuna, this meal in a bowl takes almost no effort to make. The cubes of luscious crimson fish dressed with a little salt, sugar, and spice taste great over wonderfully plain white rice or less traditional but no less delicious sushi rice.

Recipe excerpted with permission from Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. Click here to purchase your own copy.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 Cup Japanese soy sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon mirin (sweet rice wine)
  • 2 Teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • 1 to 2 Teaspoon tobanjan (chile bean sauce), preferably a Japanese brand
  • 1 Teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 Pound sushi- grade tuna, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1/2 medium Hass avocado, peeled, pitted, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 6 Cups cooked short-grain white rice or sushi rice, warm
  • 1 nori seaweed sheet
  • 1/4 Cup thinly sliced fresh shiso leaves (also called Japanese mint and perilla) or scallion greens
  • 1 Teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.


So, I took the challenge."

With countless hours spent watching food-focused television, I realized that it not only inspired me to eat but also to get into the kitchen. The professional chefs I saw on TV had skills I wanted to learn. I began to buy cookbooks and magazines so I could try out new recipes and new techniques at home. One day while in the book store perusing the shelves of the cookbook aisle, I came across a copy of Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I was familiar with Chef Morimoto from the Food Network’s show, Iron Chef America, and so I began to thumb through the book. The photos were, of course, beautiful, and I immediately wanted to try everything. However, it occurred to me that while I love to eat Japanese food, I had never actually cooked Japanese food at home. There was something about the experience of eating in a Japanese restaurant that made the cuisine, the ingredients, and the presentation, untouchable. Everything from the plating, to the taste, to the colors of the food seemed like an art form that should be left to the hands of a master chef. But here in front of me was a book that said otherwise. Here was a master chef saying I could do this at home so, I took the challenge.