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11 Foods That Soothe a Sore Throat

11 Foods That Soothe a Sore Throat

Few things are quite as bothersome as a sore throat. Many fruits, vegetables, and herbs are capable of saving the day with their antioxidant-rich powers and can sometimes help you avoid that trip to the doctor.

Click here for the 11 Foods That Soothe a Sore Throat (Slideshow)

Let’s start with ginger. Combine fresh ginger, shredded or chopped, and hot water and you’re well on the road to recovery. Ginger has been used for thousands of years in China to treat cold symptoms, such as a sore throat. According to Livestrong.com, “For cold and flu-like symptoms such as headaches and sore throat, the University of Mississippi Medical Centert suggests adding two tablespoons of fresh ginger to a cup of hot water and allow[ing] it to stand and drink two to three times per day.”

While you’re in the produce department finding your ginger root, make sure to stop by the fresh herbs. Sage, fragrant and green, has been used for decades to ease achy throats. With astringent, antiseptic, and antibacterial qualities, this herb creates an aromatic tea that’s perfect for easing a scratchy or sore throat.

If ginger and sage don’t appeal to you, stick to the basics: fruits (and, remember, whole fruits are always better than juices) high in vitamin C, lots of herbal teas, leafy green vegetables, and soft foods such as eggs and bananas. Foods such as watermelon and broccoli contain high amounts of glutathione, which is “critical for immune function and controlling inflammation,” according to Dr. Mark Hyman. Glutathione “is the master detoxifier and the body's main antioxidant, protecting our cells and making our energy metabolism run well.”

Banana


Like eggs, bananas are an easily ingested food if you have a sore throat. If you don’t like the taste, try mixing it into a smoothie with some other vitamin-packed fruits such as strawberries or blueberries.

Cabbage


Packed with vitamin C, sulfur, vitamin K, and other antioxidants, cabbage is a great vegetable to incorporate into your diet. It has powerful anti-inflammatory properties and can even relieve headaches.


This story was originally published on November 19, 2014.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.


The 11 Best Teas For Sore Throats, According To Doctors

Delicious as those cherry-flavored lozenges may be (are you sure those aren't just candy?), having a sore, scratchy throat just straight-up sucks. And when that sore throat eventually leaves you with frog voice? The icing on the cake.

Sore throats typically pop up when bacterial or viral infections affect the tissues in our throat, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain, says Dr. Robert Glatter, MD, attending emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. (Fun fact: This is technically called pharyngitis.)

When your voice starts to go&mdasha situation technically called laryngitis&mdashinflammation and swelling affect your vocal cords and their ability to vibrate, Glatter says. The result: You sound funny, or can't talk at all.

Not only does tea make you feel cozy and at-ease when your throat is throbbing, but it also offers a slew of health benefits that can help you feel better. You can also add honey to your mug, which helps coat the mucous membranes in your throat, soothing your soreness and even minimizing coughing, says Glatter.

Next time you're feeling under the weather, grab your bag of cough drops, put on Mean Girls, and sip on a few mugs-full of these super-soothing teas.

Classic green tea is a great option when your throat needs some love. &ldquoResearch indicates that green tea has anti-inflammatory effects, which may help to reduce swelling of tissues in the throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Sip on it nice and hot when you&rsquore feeling scratchy. For extra flavor, add lemon and honey.

Black tea doesn&rsquot just wake you up in the a.m. it can also relax a sore throat. &ldquoBlack tea contains compounds called tannins, which may help to reduce inflammation and ease the pain of a sore throat,&rdquo says Glatter. Gargling with black tea several times a day (yes, really!) may also help to reduce swelling and inflammation, too, he adds.

&ldquoMint tea may also help to soothe the pain of a sore throat," Glatter explains. Why? It contains a compound called menthol that has anti-inflammatory properties.

One thing to keep in mind: &ldquoMenthol can also lead to drying of tissue, so it should be used sparingly, especially if you have laryngitis,&rdquo he says.

Feel free to incorporate mint tea into your rotation just don't chug it all day long.

&ldquoWhile licorice root tea is best known for helping to alleviate upset stomach and similar issues, such as heartburn, its antibacterial and antiviral activity can also be useful for sore throats,&rdquo Glatter explains. If you dig licorice (it's polarizing, I know), definitely sip on this slightly-sweet tea when you&rsquore feeling under the weather.

Made from flowers, this bedtime classic is especially helpful when a scratchy throat or nasty cough keeps you from winding down at night. Plus, chamomile tea contains antioxidants, specifically antioxidants called flavonoids and terpenoids, that help the body fight infection, says Glatter.

Sadly, this mild tea doesn't taste like s'mores, but comes from the good-for-you marshmallow plant. &ldquoMarshmallow root secretes a gelatinous substance known as mucilage that helps to coat and soothe a sore throat," explains Glatter. "Research indicates that it also has anti-inflammatory properties."

Love ginger candies and stir-fry? You&rsquore in luck. Spicy ginger tea does wonders for your well-being, since ginger root contains a number of compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects, says Glatter. To balance the spiciness (and show your sore throat some extra love), add honey and cinnamon to your mug. &ldquoCinnamon helps boost your body's ability to fight infection,&rdquo Glatter adds.

Bright and citrusy, lemon tea boasts some serious immune benefits&mdashwith a side of zing. &ldquoGreat for helping with sore throats and colds, lemon tea is packed with vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system,&rdquo says Yeral Patel, MD, a board-certified functional medicine physician. The stronger your immune system, the better you can fight off that sore throat (or whatever ails you).

&ldquoTurmeric tea is ideal for sore throats because turmeric has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and most importantly, anti-inflammatory properties, which help soothe the throat and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. If you don't love the unusual flavor, add honey, ginger, or a little stevia to your mug.

Tulsi (also known as holy basil) tea has long been used as an herbal remedy for upper-respiratory illness, such as asthma, colds and bronchitis, and coughs. &ldquoPacked with anti-oxidants and anti-microbial properties, Tulsi can help soothe sore throats, fight off bacterial and viral infections, and boost the immune system,&rdquo says Patel. Lots of health perks here!

Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants called polyphenols, rose hip tea is great for sore throats and during the cold season. &ldquoRose hips tea also possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help soothe the throat and ease pain,&rdquo Patel says. Often blended with fruity-flavored hibiscus, this brew is light and sweet.