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The 12 Dishes of Christmas

The 12 Dishes of Christmas

Stuffed Carolina Quail by chef Vincent Pouessel

This recipe screams decadence, with a black truffle and foie gras stuffing. It doesn’t stop there, though. After being stuffed, each quail is wrapped in slices of bacon so that it’s flavorful and dynamic on the outside just as it is on the inside.

Click here to see the Stuffed Carolina Quail Recipe

Spiced Pork Loin by chef Adam Bordonaro

This loin of pork gets two doses of flavor — the first during the overnight brine, and the second the rub it’s seared and roasted in. Only a few simple steps result in an incredibly delicious and flavorful pork loin that’s great for large crowds and will easily become the star of your holiday meal.

Click here to see the Spiced Pork Loin Recipe

Slow Poached Scottish Salmon by chef Seakyeong Kim

Oven Roasted Rack of Pork by chef Anne Callaghan

Pancetta-Crusted Swordfish by chef Charlie Palmer

Often paired with relishes like ones made with olives or capers, it’s obvious that swordfish goes perfectly with salt, and Palmer is not shy about this. For his holiday swordfish, he sautés pancetta-wrapped swordfish and pairs it with fennel purée and a fennel, endive, and grapefruit salad for a salty-sweet flavor combination.

Click here to see the Pancetta-Crusted Swordfish Recipe

Seared Halibut by chef Michael Sindoni

The halibut in this dish stands up on its own, with just a tad of butter added to the end. It lets its counterparts do most of the work, with the crispy Brussels sprouts providing texture and the citrusy yuzu beurre blanc adding a burst of fresh flavor.

Click here to see the Seared Halibut Recipe

Maine Lobster-Stuffed Filet Mignon by chef Dave Holman

Double Cut Dry-Aged Bone-In Rib-Eye by chef Stephen Blandino

Maple Glazed Sonoma Duck by chef Dustin Valette

Roast Rib of Beef by chef Marcus Gleadow-Ware

Thinkstock/iStockphoto

This recipe is minimal, relying on the qualities of the meat to cook it perfectly. The ribs of the beef are great conductors of heat and the layer of fat not only serves as an additional component of flavor, but helps to baste the beef as well. Because of the many flavorful aspects of the beef alone in this recipe, very few additional ingredients are required to make it a standout dish.

Click here to see the Roast Rib of Beef Recipe

Beef Wellington by chef Jeffrey Russell

If you can’t stay away from beef on Christmas Day, put a spin on it like with this beef Wellington created by Jeffrey Russell of Charlie Palmer Steak in Washington, D.C. The beef is perfectly cooked and basted with shallots, thymes, and garlic, and topped with crispy phyllo dough to make it extra indulgent — perfect for a holiday meal.

Click here to see the Beef Wellington Recipe

Persimmon Upside-Down Cake by chef Ashley Weaver


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


12 Christmas Dishes in Traditional Russian Cuisine

Aaah, Russia. A land of snow, extreme weather temperatures and a vividly colorful history which spans over 1,000 years, Russia is also one of the most amazing places to spend Christmas.

Of course, for most of us, Christmas dinner usually consists of a generously-sized roast turkey accompanied by mouth-watering cranberry sauce, crispy roast potatoes, deliciously steamed vegetables, spicy gingerbread biscuits, aromatic mince pies, sticky fruit puddings…need I go on? In Russia, however, dishes tend to be a little different.

Prior to the Russian revolution of 1917 and the fall of the Romanov dynasty that had ruled the country for over 300 years, Russia was loyally Orthodox Christian. Under Soviet rule, however, atheism became the order of the day, and typically religious days in the calendar (such as New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day) became eagerly-celebrated national secular holidays.

Nevertheless, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the ghosts of Russian Christmas past made a rather heart-warming return, and the religious spirit quickly resumed, with customs and traditions becoming cherished again. So, Christmas Day is commonly observed on January 6 rather than December 25, due to the Orthodox Christian observance of the Julian Calendar.

This unique national history and the Orthodox influence means a Christmas in Russia is distinctly different from how countries in the west celebrate. If you fancy celebrating Russian-style this year, be sure to try these delicious festive Christmas dishes in Russia – but don’t read with an empty stomach, please.

Savory dishes


Watch the video: 12 Meals of Christmas (December 2021).