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Got Olympic Spirit? Beware

Got Olympic Spirit? Beware

When the Olympics comes to town, many daily routines come to a screeching halt and nearly everyone gets into the spirit to celebrate one of the oldest international sporting competitions. But not everyone is feeling the Olympic camaraderie.

Dennis Spurr of Weymouth, Dorset, got into the Olympic spirit by decorating his shop with five Olympic rings made of sausage and he put a sign outside with a similar visual. The "Olympic police" paid him a visit asking that he take down the non-sanctioned sausage replica, threatening a massive fine because it infringed upon Olympic copyright, reported The New York Times.

Spurr took the sign down but quickly replaced it with a similar one depicting five square sausages. The Olympic police were not amused and asked him to take that sign down as well reported The New York Times.

Spurr isn’t the only one feeling the scorn from the "Olympic police."

In an attempt to halt anyone who is not an official games sponsor from capitalizing on the Olympics, the games organizers, the London Olympic Organizing Committee, and the International Olympics Committee, teamed up in 2006 with the then-Labor government to pass a parliamentary bill, the London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Act 2006 which carries a potential £20,000 fine for anyone trying to unofficially "sponsor" the Olympics.

The Olympic enforcers came down on a cafaacé owner in Plymouth that branded one of its breakfast items as "flaming torch breakfast baguette." They were told to take it off of the menu, according to Courier Mail.

And a long-standing East London establishment was forced to change its name from Olympic to Lympic, reported the Courier Mail.

All cafés along the torch relay route were closed down with the exception of McDonald’s restaurants due to their exclusive fast-food contract with the games. McDonald’s also is the sole provider for grench fries for the events so no other providers can serve simply chips within the Olympic Park. However, a loophole does exist for those looking to get around the sponsorship ordeal; if the french fries are served with traditional battered fish and chips, it’s considered OK by the officials, according to The Sunday Guardian.

And just in case you thought of bringing in your own thermos of tea to keep you hydrated during the events, think again. According to the official rules, thermoses are banned from the games along with a host of other items, including food, drinks, any objects containing logos of non-sponsors, bottles, glass containers, and refrigerators. Yes you read that right, refrigerators.

As you dress up, tune in, and clear your schedule to watch the London 2012 Games, the Olympic Games organizers will be watching you.

Sean Flynn is a Junior Writer for The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @BuffaloFlynn


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Beware: Olympic Twitter Cops

As we near the start of the London Olympics, expect organizers to voraciously protect their brand. Those five rings cost billions of dollars, and it is probably the number one rule in the Olympic sponsorship game: Do Not Screw With The Brand.

Take for instance Usain Bolt, as one report posits. If he Tweets about how bad ass his Pumas are, LOCOG will be on him in a minute. Why? Because Adidas is the official footwear sponsor of the Olympic Games and tweeting about a competitor directly violates the International Olympic Committee’s social media policy by mentioning the wrong brand in connection with the games.

The brand, by the way, is estimated by Reuters to pull in about $3.2 billion from the London Olympics. And that's plenty good reason for LOCOG to crack down.

Though some companies, like Nike and Virgin Airways, may have already found clever ways around the restrictions. Nike rolled out several ads featuring medal hopefuls while smoothly sidestepping direct references to the London Olympics.

“You’ve got to think Virgin’s doing something,” one marketing executive told TheStar.com. “It may not happen during the games but whatever that grace period is around it they’re going to find some way to interject their brand into the games.”

Above all, though, Twitter and Facebook will present the most unique problem for Olympic organizers preventing unauthorized advertising. During the games athletes must agree with the IOC's social media policy that prohibits Twitter posts mentioning brands that aren't Olympic sponsors. But not every Tweet and post can be policed.

“What are they going to do? It’s not like it’s a doping scandal,” the executive added. “They’re billing this as being the most social games ever but it’s also the most policed and locked-down games ever. And it hasn’t even started yet.”

But beware, the IOC will be watching.

“We don’t police but we’re working closely will all the platforms to make sure the trademark and (internet protocol) rights are respected and that we have a mechanism in place if case of infringement,” dryly warned Alex Huot, the IOC's head of social media.


Watch the video: John Williams Olympic Spirit 1988 Summer Olympics (November 2021).